On Genealogy: MY Relation to Ezra CORNELL – Founder of Cornell University

I haven’t blogged in a long while, and while I’m at a dead end in another line of my tree, I decided to do more research on the Cornells. I wondered if it was the same “Cornell” that is synonymous with the Ivy League American University – Cornell.

My fifth cousin 6 times removed OR 7th great uncle’s second cousin twice removed whichever way you look at it, is Ezra Cornell (January 11, 1807 – December 9, 1874). He was an American businessman and education administrator. He was a founder of Western Union and a co-founder of Cornell University. He also served as President of the New York Agriculture Society and as a State Senator.

My relation to Ezra is two fold – direct blood line and in-law relationship as shown below:

Ezra was born in Westchester County, New York, the son of a potter, Elijah Cornell, and was raised near DeRuyter, New York. He was a first cousin, five times removed of Benjamin Franklin on his maternal grandmother’s side. He was also a cousin of Paul Cornell, the founder of Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. Having traveled extensively as a carpenter in New York State, Ezra, upon first setting eyes on Cayuga Lake and Ithaca, decided Ithaca would be his future home.

After settling in at Ithaca, NY, Ezra quickly went to work proving himself as a Carpenter. Colonel Beebe took notice of the industrious young man and made him the manager of his mill at Fall Creek.

Ezra Cornell was a birthright Quaker, but was later disowned by the Society of Friends for marrying outside of the faith to a world’s woman, a Methodist by the name of Mary Ann Wood. Ezra and Mary Ann were married March 19, 1831, in Dryden, New York.

On February 24, 1832, Ezra Cornell wrote the following response to his expulsion from The Society of Friends due to his marriage to Mary Ann Wood:

“I have always considered that choosing a companion for life was a very important affair and that my happiness or misery in this life depended on the choice”.

The young and growing family needed more income than could be earned as Manager of Beebe’s Mills. Having purchased rights in a patent for a new type of plow, Ezra began what would be decades of travelling away from Ithaca. His territories for sales of the plow were the states of Maine and Georgia. His plan was to sell in Maine in the summer and the milder Georgia in the winter. With limited means, what transported Ezra between the two states were his own two feet.

Connection to Morse Code & Western Union

Happening into the offices of the Maine Farmer in 1842, Cornell saw an acquaintance of his, one F.O.J. Smith, bent over some plans for a “scraper” as Smith called it. For services rendered, Smith had been granted a one-quarter share of the telegraph patent held by Samuel F.B. Morse, and was attempting to devise a way of burying the telegraph lines in the ground in lead pipe. Ezra’s knowledge of plows was put to the test and Ezra devised a special kind of plow that would dig a 2 feet 6 inches ditch, lay the pipe and telegraph wire in the ditch and cover it back up as it went. Later it was found that condensation in the pipes and poor insulation of the wires impeded the electrical current on the wires and so hanging the wire from telegraph poles became the accepted method. 

Cornell made his fortune in the telegraph business as an associate of Samuel Morse, having gained his trust by constructing and stringing the poles for the Baltimore–Washington telegraph line, the first telegraph line of substance, in the U.S. to address the problem of telegraph lines shorting out to the ground, Cornell invented the idea of using glass insulators at the point where telegraph lines are connected to supporting poles. After joining with Morse, Cornell supervised the erection of many telegraph lines, including a portion of the New York, Albany & Buffalo line in 1846 and the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company connecting Buffalo to Milwaukee with partners John James Speed and Francis Ormand Jonathan Smith. Cornell, Speed and Smith also built the New York and Erie line competing with and paralleling to the south the New York, Albany and Buffalo line in which Morse had a major share. The line was completed in 1849 and Cornell was made president of the company.

Cornell’s sister, Phoebe, married Martin B. Wood and moved to Albion, Michigan, in 1848. Cornell gave Wood a job constructing new lines and made Phoebe his telegraph operator, the first woman operator in the United States.

Cornell earned a substantial fortune when the Erie and Michigan was consolidated with Hiram Sibley and his New York and Mississippi Company to form the Western Union company. Cornell received two million in Western Union stock.

Ezra made his fortune in the telegraph business as an associate of Samuel Morse (yes, that Morse as in Morse Code – Samuel F.B. Morse who developed an electric telegraph and then invented, with his friend Alfred Vail, the Morse Code  in 1838) , having gained his trust by constructing and stringing the telegraph poles between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland, as the first ever telegraph line of substance in the U.S. To address the problem of telegraph lines shorting out to the ground, Cornell invented the idea of using glass insulators at the point where telegraph lines are connected to supporting poles. After joining with Morse, Cornell supervised the erection of many telegraph lines, including the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company connecting Buffalo to Milwaukee. He earned a substantial fortune as a founder of the Western Union company.

Member of Republic Party

Cornell was a Republican member of the New York State Assembly (Tompkins Co.) in 1862 and 1863; and of the New York State Senate from 1864 to 1867, sitting in the 87th, 88th, 89th and 90th New York State Legislatures.

Cornell University and Free Library

Cornell retired from Western Union and turned his attention to philanthropy. He endowed the Cornell Library, a public library for the citizens of Ithaca. A lifelong enthusiast of science and agriculture, he saw great opportunity in the 1862 Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act to found a university that would teach practical subjects on an equal basis with the classics favored by more traditional institutions. Andrew Dickson White helped secure the new institution’s status as New York’s land grant university, and Cornell University was granted a charter through their efforts in 1865.

This bronze statue of Ezra Cornell by Hermon Atkins MacNeil was erected on the university’s Arts Quad in 1919.

Cornell University derived far greater revenues than earlier land grant colleges, largely from real estate transactions directed by Ezra Cornell. Under the land-grant program, the Federal government issued the colleges scrip, documents granting the right to select a parcel of land. These colleges generally promptly sold their scrip. Ezra Cornell, on the other hand held most of the scrip, anticipating it would increase in price.He also redeemed some scrip for promising land or for rights in timber, most notably pine forest in Wisconsin. While the first land-grant colleges received around half a dollar per acre, Cornell netted an average of over five dollars per acre in 1905. 

Later Life

Ezra Cornell entered the railroad business, but fared poorly due to the Panic of 1873. He began construction of a palatial Ithaca mansion, Llenroc (Cornell spelled in reverse) to replace his farmhouse, Forest Home, but died before it was completed. Llenroc was maintained by Cornell’s heirs for several decades until being sold to the local chapter of the Delta Phi fraternity, which occupies it to this day; Forest Home was sold to the Delta Tau Delta chapter and later demolished. Cornell is interred in Sage Chapel on Cornell’s campus, along with Daniel Willard Fiske and Jennie McGraw.

Llenroc, home of Ezra Cornell

A prolific letter writer, Ezra corresponded with a great many people and would write dozens of letters each week. This was due partly to his wide travelling, and also to the many business associates he maintained during his years as an entrepreneur and later as a politician and university founder. Cornell University has made the approximately 30,000 letters in the Cornell Correspondence available online.

His eldest son, Alonzo B. Cornell, was later governor of New York. Since its founding, the University’s charter specified that the eldest lineal descendent of Cornell is granted a life seat on Cornell University’s Board of Trustees. Since Ezra Cornell IV took the post on November 17, 1969, the law was amended from specifying the “eldest male lineal descendent.”

In 1990, G. David Low, graduate of Cornell University and Space Shuttle astronaut, took with him into outer space a pair of tan silk socks worn by Ezra Cornell on his wedding day in 1831.

Honestly, I can’t even get over how a commoner like myself has so much history in her blood, her roots. If you haven’t had the chance, take a look at my other ancestral connections – too many to name. I’m again floored that his ONE LINE in my tree to America has yielded so many amazing finds.

Genealogy is my passion, I can’t wait to see who else I’m connected to. Stay tuned and follow for more …..

On Genealogy: My Connection to Explorer, Louis Joliet!

Screen Shot 2019-03-30 at 10.35.15 AMIt’s dreary and rainy out today, and I don’t wanna get out of bed.  Since I am taking a bit of a break from traveling, I thought I’d focus more so on the Genealogy part of my blog … I still have so many lines that I need to “EXPLORE”.

I select which one to follow next as I go through my green leaf hints on ancestry.ca.  I seem to gravitate the the photos and the stories prior to the actual statistics.  While doing so last night, I came across my step 10th great-uncle again – Louis Joliet and thought that I would spend more time writing about him.  I had touched a bit on him during my very 1st ancestry blog and, I thought I’d dedicate a whole page to him and his awesome accomplishments.

Before skipping onto how I got here – I suggest you read the original post which breaks down my family connection to Martin Prévost – because he is the connection to Louis Joliet, the French Explorer.


My Lineage

When Marie D’Abancourt (Louis’ mother) and her twin sister Marie were born in 1619 in Soissons, Côte-d’Or, France, their father, Adrien, was 36 and their mother, Simone, was 30. She was married three times.

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Marie D’Abancourt married Jean Jolliet in Quebec City, Quebec, on October 9, 1639, when she was 20 years old.

Her husband Jean passed away on April 24, 1651, in Quebec City, Quebec, at the age of 55. They had been married 11 years.

Marie D’Abancourt married Godfroy GUILLOT in Quebec City, Quebec, on October 19, 1651, when she was 32 years old.

Her husband Godfroy passed away on July 18, 1665, in Quebec City, Quebec, at the age of 46. They had been married 13 years.

Marie D’Abancourt married Martin Prevost on November 8, 1665, when she was 46 years old.  This was Martin’s 2nd marriage.  HE IS MY CONNECTION TO LOUIS JOLIET.

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Marriage Record between Martin Prévost and Marie D’Abancourt

From her marriage to Jean Jolliet, Marie had a child Louis – this my friends, is MY step 10th great-uncle – LOUIS JOLIET.


Louis Joliet the Explorer – Facts

At the age of 10 Louis Joliet was sent to the Jesuit College in Québec where he was educated until he left in 1667.

He became a fur trader at the age of 23, dealing with the Native Indians.

On 4th June 1671 Simon Daumont de Saint-Lusson, a military officer from New France, claimed the lands of the great lakes area for France. The ceremony in Sault Ste. Marie was attended by many of the local Indian nations and Louis Jolliet was one of the declaration’s signatories.


Mississippi Expedition

In 1672, Jolliet was chosen by Intendant Jean Talon to lead an expedition to determine whether the Mississippi, known from Aboriginal accounts, flowed into the Gulf of Mexico or the Pacific Ocean.

On 17 May 1673 Louis Joliet and his party left St. Ignace in two birch bark canoes. They headed for Green Bay on Lake Michigan before traveling along the Fox River and, after a portage (carrying water craft overland), they arrived at the Wisconsin River. Louis Joliet eventually reached the Mississippi River in June 1673.

Believing that the river would flow into the Pacific, Louis Joliet and Father Jacques Marquette explored the Mississippi writing notes and drawing maps along the way. After reaching an Indian village near present day Arkansas, Louis Joliet was able to conclude that the Mississippi would flow into the Gulf of Mexico rather that into the Pacific.

The friendly Indians in this village warned Louis Joliet and his party of the danger from hostile Indians further down the river. Taking into account this warning and the danger of running into the Spanish near the Gulf of Mexico, they decided to turn round and head back to Quebec.

Louis Joliet returned via the Illinois River and Green Bay, where, in 1674, Father Jacques Marquette decided to leave him and remain at the Saint Francis Xavier mission. While traveling through the Lachine Rapids on the Saint Lawrence River, his canoe was capsized and he lost all of his maps and journals as well as his 3 traveling companions. He was rescued by fishermen and continued on to Quebec where, after traveling 2500 miles, he arrived in 1674.

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Louis Joliet reported their discoveries to the French Governor Louis de Buade Frontenac, and went on to rewrite some of his journals from memory. However, the notes written my Marquette were relied on as being the more accurate resource.

However, in 1675, working from accounts by Jolliet and Marquette, Jean-Baptiste-Louis Franquelin drew a map of the expedition that was published in Paris in 1681 under the title Voyage et découverte de quelques pays et nations de l’Amérique septentrionale.

Many statues of Marquette and Joliet have been erected all over the area, read this article to find out where in Chicago.

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Hudson Bay Expedition

Upon his return to Québec City, Jolliet was denied a fur concession he sought for the Illinois area and joined his father-in-law in 1676 in a fur-trading company at Sept-Îles. Jolliet became seigneur of the Ȋles de Mingan in the Gulf of St Lawrence in March 1679, and of Île d’Anticosti in 1680.

In April 1679, at the behest of officials in Québec City, Jolliet embarked on an overland journey to Hudson Bay to survey the influence of English traders in the region, and to assess the possibility of a trade alliance with Aboriginals in the area. His reputation preceding him, Jolliet declined an offer from English Governor Charles Bayly to come and work for him, but became convinced that “if the English are left in this bay they will make themselves masters of all the trade in Canada.” Upon his return, Jolliet recommended that the French “remove the English from this bay,” or at the very least, “prevent them from establishing themselves any further, without driving them out or breaking with them.”


Labrador Expedition

Jolliet then concentrated on trade and fisheries at his concessions, until two raids by the English in 1690 and 1692 dealt him a financial blow from which he never recovered. On 28 April 1694, with the backing of a Québec merchant, he set sail from Québec City aboard an armed ship with 17 men and travelled along the coast as far north as lat. 56°8´ N near present-day Zoar. In addition to fishing and trading with Aboriginals along the way, Jolliet took detailed notes of the coastline and its inhabitants and completed 16 cartographic sketches — the first recorded account of the northern Labrador coast and the most detailed description of the Inuit to that time.

In April 1697, Jolliet succeeded Jean-Baptiste-Louis Franquelin as teacher of hydrography at the Jesuit College of Quebec. He was appointed hydrographer to the king of France in 1680.

In 1679 the presence of the English in the Hudson Bay area was proving a worry to the French Colony, so Louis Joliet was sent over to assess the situation. Together with seven others he left on 7th April 1679 and traveled via Saguenay, Lake St. John, Lake Mistassini and Rupert River to James Bay. The English invited him to join them, however he declined and made his way back to Quebec. He reported that the English control over Hudson Bay was a threat to Canadian trade as the area was the richest source of furs in the country.

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Routes for Joliet’s 3 expeditions

In 1681 he built a fort on the island and settled there. In the winter of 1690 the fort was briefly captured and occupied by the English.

Louis Joliet undertook an expedition sponsored by a merchant, François Viennay-Pachot, to explore the Labrador Coastline. He set off in the spring of 1694 sailing through the Strait of Belle Isle and Eskimo Bay to Zoar. He kept a journal and made notes and sketches of the people he met.

He was appointed professor of hydrography at Québec College on 13th April 1697.

Louis Joliet died in 1700 sometime between May and October. The exact place of his death is unclear although it is generally believed to have been at l’Île d’Anticosti.

Click here to read some more fun facts on Louis Joliet.

Joliet’s main legacy is most tangible in the Midwestern United States and Quebec, mostly through geographical names, including the cities of Joliet, IllinoisJoliet, Montana; and JolietteQuebec (founded by one of Joliet’s descendants, Barthélemy Joliet).

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Joliet, Illinois is a populous southwest Chicago suburb

Check out The Story of Chicago in Maps . It’s amazing what you can see when you get a little perspective. You can slide the Time Machine slider bar to see how dramatically Chicago has changed since Marquette and Joliet first visited the area.


Other Namesakes

A local cruise ship in Québec City, Québec

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Cruise Ship namesake in Québec City

He also has a fine cognac named after him – see manufacturers notes below!

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A fine cognac too, c’mon!

This makes me want to get into my LandRover and driving the 7 hours to Illinois to see all of my ancestors stuff in person.  Maybe sip on some of that nice cognac?  Maybe I can score a free bottle if I can prove I’m a relative 😉

@chicago peeps – is there a Joliet Street there?

What kinds of things are you learnings from your research?

Namaste

T xo

 

On Genealogy: Updated DNA Ethnicity Estimate

As you know, I’m a genealogy nut, or more like nerd. I love working on my family tree, although in the past 6-8 months I’ve barely looked at it more or less worked on it. I can’t even remember the last genealogy blog I posted (hang on let me check — other than a quick update on my Lee side of the family, it was on my relation to Willis Carrier King of the A/C – I posted that one in July in the midst of a sweltering heat wave – in the hotter months I’m sure most people REALLY LOVE my 9th cousin 2x removed.

I did my DNA test back in 2017 – I was super excited to get my results, and to see if they matched what I already knew about my tree.

Ethnicity updates are regularly provided on Ancestry.ca to reflect the most recent AncestryDNA ethnicity estimate.

My passion was reignited because I’ve been binge watching seasons 9 and 10 of Who Do You Think You Are? I  LOVE this show!  I’m not a celebrity but I’d LOVE if someone could collect all the little nuggets that I can’t get my hands on.

Check out my On Genealogy: series in my blog posts to read ALL my historic familial connections to a King of France, filles du roi, Honest Abe Lincoln, John Ritter, Amelia Earhart, founding members of the American Colonies, a connection to the Salem Witch Trials, my family from England, Ireland and France, an Explorer, the first documented marriage between a native and a white man and soooooo much more!

I have SOOOOO MUCH history and so much more to discover. I  have some trees I can date back to the 1500’s and others that stop in 1900 and I can’t trace them back any further – I’m stuck on an Irish line and a Scot line and I can’t find anything more on the 1st Ambrose Richards – where’s he from? Why can’t I find out anything on Joseph Edward Lee’s military records, but I was able to locate all of his brother George’s?  

As I decided to dip into my tree today, I noted some updates to my DNA Story and estimate. Since AncestryDNA first launched, they’ve continued to add new regions and improve the precision of results. DNA research is a fast-paced, cutting-edge field, and we can expect them to make more advancements as DNA science evolves.  DNA is crazy!  Each person gets 50% of their DNA from Mom and 50% from Dad. But that means 50% of each parents DNA also gets left behind. Also, what gets passed down and what gets left behind is completely random. 

This Ancestry.ca update features:

  • 16,000 reference samples
  • 500+ possible regions

What might change?

Percentages for a region could change. Some new regions could appear. Some old regions, especially low-percentage regions, could disappear. Or you might not see much change at all.

Ok, so let’s see what’s changed this time around.

(previous estimate on the left and up to date estimate on the right)

 

When AncestryDNA launched in 2012, they compared DNA against 22 possible regions. They now have more than 380.

Not only have new data and new methods enabled AncestryDNA to identify new regions, they have also improved the ability to determine how likely it is that we belong to a region. These improvements mean that our percentages for a region could go up or down.

So, I have some minor changes – mainly the elimination of low confidence regions and more clearly defining France (47%), Ireland/Scotland (27%) and England (26%) – which is congruent with my family tree research.  The percentages have also changed to a certain degree – but the findings remain what I know to be true.  The only thing I really don’t see anywhere in this is my first nations heritage – I have roots that I can trace back and I have my Algonquin card.  

How does AncestryDNA predict the migrations in my DNA story?

Migrations are based on Genetic Communities Genetic Communities are groups of AncestryDNA members who are most likely connected because they share fairly recent ancestors who came from the same region or culture.

Once they identify a Genetic Community, they look for patterns in ethnicity and data from family trees linked to AncestryDNA, including ancestral birth locations, to see where their ancestors lived and moved to.

Historical researchers use that time and place data to look for the overarching story that binds the members of a Genetic Community together. While migrations may not tell your ancestor’s story exactly, your DNA suggests that you are connected to this historical journey.

Below is my family’s migration history from Europe from the 1700’s to 1900’s.

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This is absolutely fascinating!  

The site has also introduced ThruLines which illustrates how you may be related to your DNA matches through a common ancestor.  This is excellent as it may lead me to common ancestors who can hopefully provide me with some information on the blanks in my tree – like the Lee Tree – and information on George Edward Lee’s military history and death – I’m at a complete stand still on this 😦

For those of you have Ancetry.ca what do you think of the improvements?  If you don’t have Ancestry, which site do you use?

Namaste 

T xo

UPDATED: On Genealogy – The LEE Side of ME …

UPDATED: Originally posted on June 22 2017

HELLO ALL!  HAPPY THURSDAY!  IT’S A SOGGY, DREARY AND WET ONE OUT THERE AS I WRITE TODAY … EVER SO FITTING AS TODAY’S BLOG ENTRY #6 FOCUSSES ON MY ENGLISH ROOTS AND FOLLOWS MY PATERNAL GRAND MOTHER’S, FATHER’S SIDE.  I HAVEN’T WRITTEN EXCLUSIVELY ABOUT THEM YET, BUT, I HAVE MENTIONED MY GRAMMA SALLY IN PRECEDING POSTS.  THIS BLOG ENTRY FOLLOWS, THE LEE FAMILY LINE IN YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND.

The LEE’s were a hard working, blue collared bunch.  They lived primarily in the little towns and hamlets of Yorkshire and worked mainly in factory jobs.  Meltham Mills was known for its many textile mills back in those days.

The large majority of them lived on Shady Row in Meltham Mills.  Shady Row was a row of properties built in Meltham Mills for the employees of the Jonas Brook Bros. mills (which I have confirmed is where most of the males worked based on census results). It was a co-op community.  Shady Row was a row of mill worker’s properties built next to the mills at Meltham Mills. Census returns indicate that there were a total of 60 houses.  Until a boundary change in the 1890s, the row was classified as being part of the Honley district. Census returns indicate that there were a total of 60 houses.  At the time of the 1841 Census, 57 of the houses were occupied, with a total of 339 people were residing there (averaging nearly 6 people per property).  Shady Row was still in existence in the late 1940s, but had been demolished by 1965.

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Shady Row highlighted in green – 1929 map

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SARAH ANN LEE

Screen Shot 2017-12-16 at 9.35.54 PMMy gramma, Sarah Ann Lee, affectionately known as Sally, was born on December 7, 1922.  Her father, Joseph, was 26, and her mother, Ellen (née Plant), was 30.

She was born in MELTHAM-MILLS (now just called Meltham), Yorkshire, England.  It lies in the Holme Valley, below Wessenden Moor, four and a half miles south-west of Huddersfield on the edge of the Peak District National Park. The population assessed at the 2011 Census was 8,534  The chapelry comprises parts of the townships of Meltham and Honley.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 12.19.06 PMI’ve located her birth registration in England & Wales, Civil Registration Marriage Index, 1916-2005, for births registered the first quarter of 1923.  I have not been able to locate her actual birth record as of yet.  I need to confirm her actual  year of birth as there is a discrepancy  from what I have been told i.e. 1922 and the historical records confirming her registration in 1923.  

Her father Joseph Edward passed away in 1930 in England at the age of 34 and her mother Ellen Ann passed away on May 9, 1936, at the age of 44.  So, she was orphaned at the tender age of 13.

She married Benjamin Richards on June 20, 1945, in Agbrigg, Yorkshire, England, at the age of 22 while Benny was there on military service during WWII.

Transcribed excerpt from Grampa’s military record:

June 20 1945:  Married with permission to Miss Sarah Ann Lee in Agbrigg, Yorkshire, England.

Agbrigg is a suburb of the city of WakefieldWest Yorkshire, England.

Per Grampa Benny’s military records her address as next of kin is noted as 4 Pick Hiss Rd, Meltham Yorkshire, England. NB: Since she was orphaned at 13, what happened to her?  I am wondering if she was living with her sister, Mary at this time.  What did she do from 13 to 22?  Who did she live with?  Did she have another boyfriend before grampa? Did she work?  I literally cannot locate any records of her for this period of time …  How did she and grampa meet?   

As we know, Gramma was a war bride.  She arrived at Pier 21 in Halifax in 1946, which is Canada’s equivalent to the USA’s Ellis Island in New York.  I was able to locate her in the Canadian Wives Bureau records and have just have written to the Department of Immigration for a true copy of her arrival documents, which will likely contain the passenger log and her Canadian naturalization documentation.

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Sarah sailed to her new home on the RMS Aquitania, a Cunard Line ocean liner built in Clydebank, Scotland. The ship was launched on 21 April 1913 and sailed on herScreen Shot 2017-06-22 at 11.56.16 AM.pngmaiden voyage to New York on 30 May 1914. Aquitania was the third in Cunard Line’s “grand trio” of express liners including the RMS Mauritania and RMS Lusitania, and she was the last surviving four-funnelled ocean liner. Widely considered one of the most attractive ships of her time, Aquitania earned the nickname “Ship Beautiful”.  In her 36 years of service, Aquitania survived military duty in both world wars. After completing troopship service, the vessel was handed back to Cunard in 1946, and was used to transport war brides and their children to Canada under charter from the Canadian government. This final service created a special fondness for Aquitania in Halifax, Nova Scotia, the port of disembarkation for these immigration voyages

I understand she that took the train from Halifax, NS to Mattawa, ON where Grampa met her and they carried on to Témiscaming QC by train (there were no roads leading into town at that time) to live with Lina  (Angelina – Benny’s mother/Sally’s M-I-L) in Lumsden.  This was stated in documentation twice.  Once in Benny’s military records on discharge and in Sally’s document from the Canadian Archives which I obtained earlier this week.

Excerpt from Benny’s military records:

” … Richards married in England and expects his wife to join him in a few months.  They can live with his mother until they secure a house through the paper company, who are building homes for returning service personnel”.

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According to the Canadian Wives Naturalization Record I found, Sally resided at 19 Pickhill Road, Meltham, Huddersfield

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Location of 19 Pickhill Road, Meltham –  circa 2009 (📷: Google Earth)

Sally and Benny had seven children during their marriage (Christine, Malcolm, Ralph, Gwendolyn, Rosemary, Patrick, Kenneth).  She had 7 children in 9 years.

She was an avid knitter and puzzler (no she didn’t like to puzzle people, she enjoyed working on puzzles 😉),  I remember she would make them when I would visit her in Verdun, QC.  I’m told that she was also a teetotaler – I had no idea what that term even meant until 2:05 PM.  Def’n as per Wikipedia: When at drinking establishments, teetotalers (or teetotallers) either abstain from drinking completely, or consume non-alcoholic beverages such as water, juice, tea, coffee, virgin drinks, mocktails, and alcohol-free beer.  So, she didn’t drink.  She apparently ceased drinking alcohol after getting a little too tipsy one evening on rye (It’s ok gramma, haven’t we all?).

In connecting with my uncle Kenny and my aunt Gwen (I wish my dad was still alive so I could ask him some if this) –  they moved in to 102 Anvik Avenue (in Témiscaming) in or about 1955.

At that time Témiscaming was a company (CIP) town and the company owned everything including the homes. The company sold the houses in or about 1972, Sally and Benny bought theirs. The row house was tiny.  4 rooms total (living room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, 1 washroom). It was only 2 stories, no basement. Aunty Gwen remembers them digging out the basement until they hit a big rock … they were able to move the furnace down there.  Only the front bedroom had closet space … Grampa built one in the back room for the 3 girls … that and a double bed.  The bathroom had a toilet and bathtub … no sink.  They were 9 living there – 7 kids,  2 adults.  There was also an enclosed, unheated back porch.  The whole space was about 600 sq ft.  The address was originally 502 Elm Ave, but the Dutch Elm disease killed all the Elm trees ands the town renamed it Anvik Ave and renumbered the houses….. the number became 102 instead of 502.

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📷: circa 2013 (it’s the unit to the right with the brown front door)

FYI:  The Canadian International Paper Company (CIP) was a Montréal based forest products company.  The mill in Témiscaming was originally built by the Riordon Pulp and Paper Company, later bought by CIP. When CIP wanted to close its mill in this one industry town, the employees formed Tembec to take over the operation. Tembec was sold just last month (May 2017).  It agreed to a takeover offer from Rayonier Advanced Materials in an $807-million (U.S.) deal.

Her husband Benjamin George passed away, at home, on June 17, 1977, in Verdun, Québec, at the age of 61. They had been married 31 years.

Gramma Sally ending up selling the house to Lucien Bernard for $6,000 in 1978 and moved to Verdun, Québec to live with her daughter Gwen, son-in-law Serge and her grandkids Marc and Caroline.

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Gramma Sally and I – 1988 – Verdun Québec

Gramma never lost her English accent in all her years of living in Canada, more specifically Québec.  I always did find it interesting that gramma moved from England to Québec – that she was plopped in the middle of a French speaking province and managed quite well.

She wrote often – my letters were always address to Miss Tina ***** and my brother’s always to Master Darrel **** – she spelled Darryl incorrectly all of the time – but it was cute – we’d get $10-$20 for our birthdays and Christmas.

Gramma passed away on March 29, 1993 in Verdun, Québec, at the age of 70 years of cardiac and renal failure resulting from complications of Diabetes Mellitus.

At the time of her death she had 20 grandchildren and had just missed the first of her first great grandchild by 2 months.  Auntie Gwen told Gramma that she had to keep alive until June as then she would become a great grandmother.  Aunt Gwen told me that “she always mentioned that she wasn’t a great grandmother yet and her sister Mary had so many……before she died she did say that she would never get to see her first great grandchild or be a great grandmother”.

I was pregnant with my oldest, at the time that Gramma passed.  It was a tough weekend as my Grand Mémère on my mom’s side and Gramma Sally on my dad’s side passed away 2 days apart and at 7 months pregnant I had to trek up North to attend both funerals on the same day – in different provinces – thankfully Témiscaming and Bonfield are only about 1h10mins apart.

She is buried alongside her husband in Témiscaming, QC – how fitting of a tombstone footer,  “A small corner in a foreign land, that is forever England”

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***I HAVE DECIDED TO KEEP THE BIOS OF HER LINEAGE TO A MINIMUM.  I JUST HAVE TOO MUCH INFORMATION AND PHOTOS TO ADD TO THIS TO MAKE IT EASY TO FOLLOW***

JOSEPH EDWARD LEE AND ELLEN ANN PLANT

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.41.20 PM.pngJoseph Edward Lee was born on August 24, 1896, in Batley, Yorkshire, England. Batley is a town in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Batley is a very old town in the West Riding of Yorkshire. It was mentioned in the Doomsday Book in 1086 and was listed in the 1379 Poll Tax.

When he was born his father, Tom, was 27 as was his mother, Hannah.

His brother George Victor was killed in action on November 4, 1915 in France and Flanders in WWI.

He married Ellen Ann Plant in December 1918 in Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England when he was 22 years old.

He died as a young father in 1930 in England at the age of 34.  I am looking for a cause of death – I suspect he was ill because the census records indicate that they moved from 33 Shady Row where they had lived for many years to 6 Shady Row, in 1930 – the same year he died.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.41.41 PMWhen Ellen Ann Plant was born on May 10, 1892, in Honley, Yorkshire, England, her father, Tom, was 29, and her mother, Sarah, was 31. Honley, a village in West Yorkshire, England. It is situated near to Holmfirth and Huddersfield, and on the banks of the River Holme in the Holme Valley.

She was baptized on Dec 10 1892 at St Mary with Brockholes, St George, Yorkshire, England (Honley).

April 2 1911 – the census notes that her family lives at 4 Oldsfield in Honley. She is single & 19 y/o. She works as a Cotton Frame Tenter at a cotton factory. A frame tenter works in the Spinning Room & looks after spinning frames. Her father must have died as her mom is noted as being the head of the household.

She died on May 9, 1936, at the age of 43. It is said that she passed from Dropsy. We know that the term Dropsy is no longer used in today’s medical terms – it’s an ol’ fashioned term to describe the presence of generalized swelling, but you just get or die from edema without some etiology – usually it was due to acute decompensated heart failure. Prior to the twentieth century, heart failure was known as Dropsy.  I’ve seen this Dx come up in a few other death certificates throughout my family tree journey.


TOM LEE & HANNAH CRABTREE

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.43.13 PMWhen Tom Lee was born in 1869 in Liversedge, Yorkshire, England, his father, Samuel, was 43 and his mother, Martha, was 45. He married Hannah Crabtree on January 26, 1889, in Batley, Yorkshire, England.

In the April 2 1911 census he is noted as Married; Head of House. There were 9 people living in a 4 room dwelling at 3 Shady Row Meltham Mills, Meltham. He was working as a Bobbin Maker. MIL Sarah Crabtree lived with them as she is widowed (72). The census notes of 8 children; 6 were alive & 2 dead.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.43.30 PMHannah Crabtree was born in 1869 in Hull, Yorkshire, England, to Sarah Ann Pickles, age 30, and William Crabtree, age 40.

She was imprisoned on Aug 25 1890 for obscene language at HMP Wakefield.  Sentence Imprisonment or Servitude Released on August 29, 1890.  She was jailed along with mother Sarah Ann Crabtree.  I am making the assumption they got into an argument and used threw in a few F bombs lol


SAMUEL LEE & MARTHA LEE

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.44.34 PM.pngWhen Samuel Lee was born in January 1826 in Holmfirth, Yorkshire, England, his father, William Lee, was 26 and his mother, Mary Raine, was 22.

He was baptized on 26 Mar 1826 at Holmfirth, Holy Trinity, Yorkshire, England.

Samuel Lee married Martha Lee in Almondbury, Yorkshire, England, on February 9, 1845, when he was 19 years old.  Marriage records indicates that Samuel was a is a  Bachelor, employed as a Spinner and that Martha was a Spinster. They marked their signatures with X’s so that tells me that they were unable to write.

They lived in Honley, Yorkshire, England, in 1851 and resided at 65 Dean House. He and Martha and Harriett and Sarah Ann are all living here.  He was employed as a Spooner.  As a Sponner he would work in the Spinning Room and would operate one or more usually two facing each other, spinning machines, each with many spindles, to make thread. Because the floor beneath spinning machines was soaked in the oil from the cotton, spinners usually worked barefoot. Spinners normally employed their own piecers and paid them directly. A spinning mule might have up to 1200 spindles from end to end and be nearly 100 yards long. A spinner would be paid according to the amount of thread produced.

On the 1881 census they lived in Batley, Yorkshire, England.  They were living at Temperance House at 175 Wilton St. He is living with Martha, William (who is working as a Clogger –  i.e. made wooden shoes “clogs”, in England they were usually leather with thick wooden soles) and Tom who is in school. They also have a boarder staying with them. Sam is working as an Eating House Keeper (would an eating house keeper mean someone who owned a cafe or was just managing it?)

He died in 1901 at the age of 75.

Martha Lee was born in 1824 in Honley.  The marriage record indicates that Martha’s Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.44.42 PMdad’s name is John Lee. He and William both worked as Weavers.  So her maiden name is Lee as well?

Martha is absent from the 1901 census leading me to believe that she passed away between 1891 and the 1901 census. In this census Sam is listed as widowed and is living with William Brown (75) and Martha Brown (75).

 


WILLIAM LEE & MARY RAINE

William Lee was born in 1800 in Newbiggin, Durham, England. He married Mary Raine Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.46.22 PM.pngon March 4, 1821, in Middleton in Teesdale, Durham, England. They had ten children in 21 years. He died on May 17, 1883, having lived a long life of 83 years.

In the 1851 census they are living in Holwick, Yorkshire, England  He is listed as Head of Household. He is working as a Lead Miner. He has some of his grand children living with them (not sure whose, two have last name Lee and the other Longmire).

In the 1871 census, we find them in Wooldale, Yorkshire, England, they are residing at 6 Muslim Hall. They have a visitor, Joseph Broadbent, age 26 who is a Grocer’s Assistant. William is still working at 70 as a Wool Weaver.

In 1881 we find him living in the Hamlet of Holwick, Yorkshire, England.  Marital Status: Widower. He is a retired lead miner and farmer.

Mary Raine was born in abt 1800 in Yorkshire, England, died in October 1874 when she was 74 years old.

I haven’t been able to trace the line back any further than this for the time being.  I’ll keep on searching.

Namaste

T xo


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On Genealogy: Willis Carrier – One COOL Dude!

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I haven’t written a blog on genealogy in what feels like a long while.  We’ve been going through a bit of a heat wave in South Western Ontario the last few days, it’s cooler and less humid today at around 25 Celsius.  For the better part of the last week it has been hitting near 40 or over with the humidex factor!

Our BEST FRIEND at times like this, all over the world, is my relative … inventor of the air conditioner (AC).  What better time than mid-summer than to pay homage to my 9th cousin 2x removed — the world’s coolest dude – Willis Carrier!


The Man, The Myth, The Legend

Willis Haviland Carrier was an American engineer. Carrier invented the first electrical air conditioning unit in 1902 and in 1915, he founded Carrier Corporation – to this day, the Carrier Corporation remains a world leader in commercial and residential HVAC and refrigeration – I mean shouldn’t they be?  He invented it lol.

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Willis Carrier was born on November 26, 1876, in Angola, New York, the son of Duane Williams Carrier (1836–1908) and Elizabeth R. Haviland (1845–1888).

Copy of 1892 Federal Census:

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He studied at Cornell University, graduating in 1901 with a BSE degree.  In Buffalo, New York, on July 17, 1902, in response to a quality problem experienced at the Sackett-Wilhelms Lithographing & Publishing Company of Brooklyn, Willis Carrier submitted drawings for what became recognized as the world’s first modern air conditioning system. The 1902 installation marked the birth of air conditioning (hallelujah!!!) although he coined his machine an apparatus for treating air – the term AC was actually named by Stuart Cramer, another engineer working on the problem of controlling the amount of humidity in the air.  The patent for Carrier’s Apparatus for Treating Air was granted in the dead of winter–on January 2, 1906.

In 1910 he was living in Buffalo Ward 17, Erie, New York on Woodward Avenue.  He is listed as a Cousin

Occupation: Machinist Engineer
Industry: Forge Company
Employer, Employee or Other: Wage Earner

He lis living there with the Otto’s and his wife Claire.

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A copy of his WWI Draft Registration:

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With this home cooling was now possible. Carrier had chilled a millionaire’s mansion as early as 1914, but the price in the 1930s ran at least $1,500.  This was too expensive for the average person and wasn’t really a thing until the 1950’s when companies like GE and Westinghouse lead the way.

I was able to locate his passport application:

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Copy of the US Federal Census of 1930:

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Willis resided in Essex County, New Jersey with his wife Jennie (63) and his adopted son Vernon (27-single) who was a Journalist.  They had two servants listed – Sidney (39) and what appears to be Jesse (39) Smith from England as well as their son Vince (10).  The Smith’s immigrated in the year 1919.  The home was owned and was valued at $50,000.00.

Carrier died in October of 1950, he suffered a heart attack – he didn’t live to see the success and take off of home AC systems.

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Carrier had three of his wives, (Claire Seymour, d. 1912; Jennie Martin, d. 1939; Elizabeth Marsh Wise, d. 1964), all are buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo, New York. Despite being married three separate times, Willis Carrier fathered only one child, Howard Carter Willis.  

He was posthumously inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 1985. He also was named one of TIME magazine’s “100 Most Influential People of the 20th Century”, in 1998.

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My Lineage

So this is the lineage of how I am connected to Willis Carrier.

Willis Carrier (1876 – 1950)
9th cousin 2x removed
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Elizabeth R. Haviland
Mother of Willis Carrier 
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Ann Elizabeth Button
Mother of Elizabeth R. Haviland
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Lydia Otis
Mother of Ann Elizabeth Button
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Dr. Harris Otis
Father of Lydia Otis
|
Sarah Harris
Mother of Dr. Harris Otis
|
Martha Jenckes
Mother of Sarah Harris
|
Nathaniel Jenckes
Father of Martha Jenckes
|
Martha Brown
Mother of Nathaniel Jenckes
|
Mary Holmes (1628 – 1690)
Mother of Martha Brown
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Katherine Hyde (1608 – 1682)
Mother of Mary Holmes
|
Martha Holmes (1640 – 1711)
Daughter of Katherine Hyde
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Hannah Audley (1643 – 1685)
Daughter of Martha Holmes
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Abigail Devol (1695 – 1719)
Daughter of Hannah Audley
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Job Milk II (1725 – 1804)
Son of Abigail Devol
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Sarah Milk (1749 – 1830)
Daughter of Job Milk II
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Roger Moore (1775 – 1860)
Son of Sarah Milk
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Olive Moore (1821 – 1871)
Daughter of Roger Moore
|
|
Ambrose Richards (1885 – 1957)
Son of George Howard Richards
|
|
Patrick James Richards (1954 – 2014)
Son of Benjamin George Richards
|
Tina Rose Richards
I am the daughter of Patrick James Richards

I tell you, I’m finding soooo many cool (no pun intended) relations ….

Who are you connected to that you’re pretty excited about, I’d be interested to know???

Namaste

T xo

On Genealogy: The Loyalist, The Spy and The American Revolution

I took a bit of a break from my close relatives because I found another interesting leaf hint and decided to follow it.  I saw this one before, but, I felt I would have to do a lot of research so I passed.  Then I came across something else on the same person and decided to go with it … it might be interesting — and it was.

For this story, you’ll have to put on your history caps and go with me all the way back to the American Revolution.  Now, I am Canadian – I haven’t studied American history in depth but we did certainly cover it in grade 11 world history.

The American Revolution (1775-83) which is also referred to as the American Revolutionary War OR the U.S. War of Independence was essentially a civil war based on who would rule in the Thirteen Colonies. France entered the American Revolution on the side of the colonists in 1778, turning what had essentially been a civil war into an international conflict. After French assistance helped the Continental Army force the British surrender at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781, the Americans had effectively won their independence, though fighting would not formally end until 1783.

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My Connection to The Loyalist and The Spy

Edward Hicks Sr. + Elvina Cornell (Gen 6)

See below for story of Edward Hicks – The Loyalist

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Joseph Hicks + Elizabeth Loose (Gen 1)

( Joseph Hicks was born in  1767 in Albany, NY, and died in 1815 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada).  

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U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records in Selected States, 1639-19 New YorkSchenectady – Schenectady Marriages, Vol 5, Book 45

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Sarah Hicks 1775-1872
Daughter of Joseph Hicks
Olive Moore 1821-1871
Daughter of Sarah Hicks
Ambrose Richards 1885-1957
Son of George Howard Richards
Benjamin George Richards 1916-1977
Son of Ambrose Richards
Patrick James Richards 1954-2014
Son of Benjamin George Richards
|
Tina Rose Richards
You are the daughter of Patrick James Richards

=====================================================================

More About Edward Hicks Sr. My 6x Great Grand Father – The Loyalist

Edward Hicks was born on May 2, 1736, in Suffolk, New York, USA.

Edward married Elizabeth Elvina Levina Cornell in 1758 at the age of 22 in New York.  Elizabeth is the daughter of Samuel Mott Cornell and Hannah Cornwall.

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Children of Edward and Elvina:
1 – 1759 his son Benjamin Hicks was born in Long Island, NY, died in 1835 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward, Ontario, Canada.
2 – 1760 his son Edward (The Spy) Hicks was born in Albany, NY, died in 1832 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward, Ontario, Canada.
3 – 1762 his daughter Mary Hicks was born in Albany, New York, died in 1804 in Athens, Leeds, Ontario, Canada
4 – 1765 his son David Hicks was born in Albany New York.
5 – 1767 his son Joseph Hicks was born in Albany, NY, and died in 1815 in Marysburgh, Prince Edwards, Ontario, Canada.
6 – 1769 his son Daniel Hicks was born in Albany, NY. and died in 1821 in Hallowell, Ontario, Canada.
7 -1771 his daughter Elizabeth Hicks was born in Albany, NY. her death was in 1807.
8 -1774 his son Joshua Hicks was born in Sugar Run, Bradford Cty, PA., died in 1838 in Marysburgh, Prince Edwards, Ontario, Canada.

He was a member of the Society of Friends.  He was a Quaker.

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U.S. Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935

—– 1771
Location: Wyoming County, Pennsylvania
Description: George Kentnor, Edward Hicks, Jacob Bowman, John Secord Retrieved From: Ancestry.ca History of Bradford County, Pennsylvania: with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers Chapter III. Settlements in Bradford County previous to the Battle of Wyoming, July 8, 1778 pages 67-68

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Edward Hicks was an entrepeneur who not only settled on the frontier, but was also actively involved in organizing settlements in the frontier. The Hicks’ had 600 acres of frontier lands on the Susquehannah.  He was one of the principle organizers, becoming in the process the first white settler in Wilmot Township, Bradbury County PA.

—–There is also evidence that Edward developed land in New York, especially with George Hicks in that part of New York which ultimately became part of New Hampshire. He may have done this also around Dutchess County.  The Susquehannah lands were part of the Connecticut and Pennsylvania lands settlement. The indications are that those enterprises in which Edward Hicks was involved were on a very large scale.

—-There is much debate on who Edward’s parents are.  The one I’ve seen online from a John Hicks – is that he is a descendant of Thomas Hicks.  How does an ordinary farm boy learn to do this all of this development? From whence the inspiration? It would certainly help if your grandfather were Thomas Hicks, land developer and Judge, whose activities in developing vast acreages of land are well documented. Thomas of course was Isaac’s father and this activity of Edward, so resembles that of Thomas Hicks.

—- We do know that he took his entire family including his wife Levina and eight children into the Pennsylvania wilderness in 1775, built a home and cleared land, and fed and clothed them and all of them survived.

—–In about March of 1777, before the breakup of the ice in the Susquehannah he and his two oldest sons joined with other loyalists along the river to travel from their homestead at the mouth of the Sugar Run (across from present day Wyalusing PA) with horses to Fort Niagara (Near present day Lewiston NY).

—–At the end of the summer’s campaign the Susquehannah men in Butler’s Rangers received permission to return to the Susquehannah to evacuate their families. Edward Hicks was among these and was captured by the Westmoreland militia as he was nearing home in late December 1777 or early January 1778. He remained in custody until his death in 1778 or 1779. There are accounts of both years. I am inclined to accept 1778 as it appears that Levina remarried in September of 1779.

—–Before the War, Edward Hicks’s home was known to be a safe house for loyalists to King George (Tories) as they made their way from Philadelphia into the interior, even to the Ohio valley. George Washington was not very pleased about this.

—–When in 1779 General Sullivan was ordered to take an army of 10,000 men up the Susquehannah to destroy the Indian villages and any remants of the Tories and their homesteads he is said to have stopped outside of Wyalusing in mid September. There is no doubt that the Hicks homestead received a special inspection and treatment at that time.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Screen Shot 2018-02-10 at 6.56.10 PMI was able to locate an extract of their companies.

Per the Revolutionary War Records Edwd Hicks Senr, was listed as a Private paid  £ 30.8 at the rate of 2 shillings per day for 204 days of service from Dec 25 1777 to October 24 1778 (Pay Rolls of Butler’s Rangers 1777-1778).

Benjamin Hicks was listed as a Private in Captain William Caldwell’s Company of Butler’s Rangers paid £30.8 at the rate of 2 shillings per day for 304 days of service from 25 Dec 1777 to 24 Oct 1778. (Pay Rolls of Butler’s Rangers 1777-1778)

Edwd Hicks Junr, Private, taken on the Susquehana Jany 1778, named in “A List of Persons in the hands of the Congress belonging to the Corps of Rangers, Royalists & their Families”.  He was listed in Private Captain William Caldwell’s Coy of Butler’s Rangers and paid at the rate of 2 shillings per day for 304 days of service from December 25 1777 to 1778 (Pay Rolls of Butler’s Rangers 1777-1778).  He was taken prisoner 3rd of January 1778, returned and present at Muster 5th November 1779  £377.3 (Pay to Rangers taken prisoner and casualties).

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Butler’s Rangers –  Walter Butler’s Coy.

[Extract]

We the undermentioned Commissioned & non Commissioned Officers & Privates of Captain Walter BUTLER’s Company of Rangers do acknowledge to have received from John BUTLER Esqr. Major Commandant of the Corps of Rangers the full amount of our Pay from 24th December 1777 to 24th October 1778 inclusive.

commencing Ending
Captain Walter BUTLER 25 Decr. 1777 24 Octr. 1778
1st Lieutenant Andrew THOMPSON      do      do
2d Lieutenant Philip FREY      do 21 May 1778
Sgt Moses MOUNTAIN      do 24 Octr. 1778
Sgt Randle McDANNEL      do      do
Sgt Lewis MABEE      do      do
Cpl Henry PUTNAM      do      do
Cpl Thomas McCORMICK 25 June 1778      do
Cpl Jacob FREDERICK 25 Decr. 1777      do
Peter MILLER      do      do
Harmanus HOUSE      do      do
John SMYTH      do      do
Michael MORIN      do      do
John LORD      do      do
Hugh JONES      do      do
George HOUSE      do      do
John HOUSE      do      do
John DAVIS      do      do
Joseph SIRN      do 24 June 1778
Joseph PAGE      do 24 Octr. 1778
Derck BELL      do      do
Thomas YOLE      do      do
George STEWART      do      do
Emanuel HUMFRIES      do      do
Frederick WINTER      do      do
Henry WINTER      do      do
John RICHART      do      do
Nicholas PHILIPS, Senr.      do      do
John YARNS      do      do
Adam BOWMAN, Junr.      do      do
Jacob BRUNNER      do      do
Redman BERRY      do      do
Charles ANGER      do      do
Henry WINDECKER      do      do
John YOUNGS      do      do
Thomas SILK      do      do
Jacob TAKE      do      do
John SEACORD, Senr.      do      do
John SEACORD, Junr.      do      do
Solomon SEACORD 25 Decr. 1777 24 June 1778
Stephen SEACORD      do 24 Octr. 1778
David SEACORD      do      do
Silas SEACORD      do 24 June 1778
Peter SEACORD      do 24 Octr. 1778
Jacob BOWMAN      do      do
Peter SIMMON      do      do
John PHILIPS      do      do
Jacob ENGUSH      do      do
Robert FARRINGTON      do      do
Henry SMITH      do      do
Adin SEABIE      do      do
Nicholas PHILIPS, Senr.      do      do
Conrad SILL      do      do
Joshua BEABIE      do      do
Abraham WARTMAN      do      do
Augustus ANGER      do      do
Edward HICKS, Senr.      do      do
Charles DEPUE      do      do
Thomas GRIFFIS      do      do
Great Britain, British Library, Additional Manuscripts, No. 21765, folios 44-45.
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Butler’s Rangers – Caldwell’s Coy.

[Extract]

We the undermentioned Commissioned & non Commissioned Officers & Privates of Captain William CALDWELL’s Company of Rangers do acknowledge to have received from John BUTLER Esqr. Major Commandant of a Corps of Rangers the full amount of our Pay from 24th December 1777 to 24th October 1778 inclusive.

Commencing Ending
Captain William CALDWELL 25 Decr. 1777 24 Octr. 1778
1st Lieutenant Bernard FREY      do      do
2d Lieutenant Peter HARE      do      do
Serjt. Frederick DOCKSTEDER      do      do
Serjt. Daniel YOUNG      do      do
Serjt. Joseph PETRIE      do      do
Corpl. Benjamin McKAY      do      do
Corpl. Benjamin DAVIS      do      do
Corpl. James WILSON      do      do
Henry SIMMON      do      do
Adam BOWMAN, Senr.      do      do
Isaac VOLKENBURG      do      do
John HOVER      do      do
Jacob BOWMAN, Junr.      do      do
Stephen FERRINGTON      do      do
Oldrick SHATT      do      do
George KINTNER      do      do
Robert REYNOLDS      do      do
Philip BUCH      do      do
Edward HICKS      do      do
Frederick FRANK      do      do
Frederick SMITH      do      do
Jacob HUNTINGER      do      do
Benjamin HICKS      do      do
John TOPP      do      do
John CARLOCK      do 31 July 1778
James BAKER      do 24 Octr. 1778
Henry TEAL      do 24 June 1778
John CLAUS      do 24 Octr. 1778
Frederick VANDERLIP      do      do
William QUACK      do      do
John McDONNEL      do      do
John MOSS      do      do
Peter McDONNEL      do      do
Jacob SPARBECK      do      do
John STEPHENS      do      do
William BUSH      do      do
James DAWSON      do 24 April 1778
John PARKER      do 24 Octr. 1778
David BRASS 25 Decr. 1777 24 June 1778
Adam KRYSLER      do 18 May 1778
David HOLLAND      do 31  do
Thomas BROOKS      do 24 Octr. 1778
Henry BOSS      do      do
James EMPSON      do      do
Robert CAMPBELL      do      do
James BROWN      do      do
Charles SMITH 25 June 1778      do
Abner SPENCER 25 Decr. 1777 31 May 1778
Thomas McCORMICK      do 24 June 1778
William SMITH 30  do 31 May 1778
Frederick SEGAR      do 24 Octr. 1778
Richard McGINNES      do      do
James CROWDER      do      do
Isaac CROWDER      do      do
William NEWBERRY      do 24 June 1778
John SMITH 25 June 1778 24 Octr. 1778
John TURNEY, Junr.      do      do
Pay of 3 Contingent Men 25 Decr. 1777      do
 Great Britain, British Library, Additional Manuscripts, No. 21765, folios 64-65.

He was was captured along with his son, Edward Jr, who were both sentenced to death. Edward Sr was hung in 1778 in Minisink (a town located in southwest Orange County, New York) as a traitor, but his widow and sons escaped to Canada. Details of his death cannot be proved conclusively – nor that I have found to date.  I can’t find much that they “escaped” to Canada, but it stands to reason.

Edward was later officially recognized as a U.E. Loyalist, so his widow and children were compensated for their losses with extensive land grants in Marysburg, Prince Edward Co, Ontario —- thus originating an extensive Ontario Hicks line.

Possible verification of Edward Jr’s arrest is as follows: (Hist of Kuykendall Fam, by G B Kuykendall, Kilham Stan & Prnt Co, Portland, OR, 1919, p 331 & 332) Wilhelmus Kuykendall – The next pension claim found was that of Wilhelmus Kuykendall. His application was made October 9, 1832. In his “statement” he said that he “Entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated; he resided in the town of Minisink, Orange county, and state of New York, and in 1778 went into service under Lieutenant Martyn Decker; went in pursuit of Robert Land and Edward Hix, who were sent from New York to carry dispatches to the Indians at Niagara, and captured said Land and Hix and delivered them over to Lieut. Bull, belonging to Spencer’s regiment, afterwards to General Pulaski, in New Jersey state, making the time in the last mentioned service one half month.

Rebel Court Martial of Robert Land & Edward Hicks Jr.

At a General Court Martial held at Minisink the 17th and continued by adjournment till the 19th day of March 1779 by order of Brigadier General Hand.

Lieut. Colonel Lindsley, President
Major Burchardt, German Regt.     Major Lamagne, Armands Corps
Captn. Shots, Indept. Corps     Captn. Selen, Indept. Corps
Captn. Brodderick,
Col. Spencers Regt.
    Captn. Weatherby,
Spencers Regt.
Captn. Boyer, Germn. Regt.     Captn. Balsar, Germn. Regt.
Lt. Young, Col. Spencers Regt.     Lt. Orr, Col. Spencers Regt.
Ensn. Clegner, Germn. Regt.     Ensn. Irvendover, Germn. Regt.
The Members being present and duly Sworn and Adjt. Bonnel of Col. Spencers Regt. acting as Judge Advocate and Prosecuting in behalf of the United States being also Sworn the Court proceed to Business.

Prisoner: Robert LAND brought before the Court charged with being a Spy and carrying Intelligence to the Enemy, Pleads not Guilty.

Evidence: James Vanokee Esqr. being Sworn saith, that at the beginning of the present War, the Prisoner was suspected of being a Tory, and examined before the Northamton County Committee. That in consequence of his swearing Allegiance to the United States he was set at Liberty.

Arthur Vantoil being sworn saith that on Thursday evening the 11th Inst. he went to Daniel Courtwrites a Neighbour of his suspecting that a number of Tories were at his House, and to see if he could get any Intelligence of them.

That when he went to the Door, he saw the Prisoner (LAND) eating Supper, as soon as LAND saw him he seized his Musket which was by his side with a Bayonet fixed. At which he, the Deponent, left the door.

He further says that Courtwright came out of the House, and he asked him if there was any news, or any Tories in his House, that he told him there was no need, neither was there any Tories in the House.

Lt. Decker being Sworn saith that the 14th Inst. he went towards Coshithton with a party of men, after a number of Tories that were on their way from New York to Niagara.

That about three OClock P.M. he fell in with them and took LAND and HICKS, he further says that LAND told him after he was made prisoner that he was going to the Enemy at Niagara.

— Adjourned till tomorrow ten O’Clock.—-

18th March – The Court met According to Adjournment.

Captn. Tyler (formerly an Inhabitant of Coshithton) being sworn saith that at the Commencement of the present war, he heard the prisoner say that he never would take up arms against the King of Britain.

That sometimes afterwards he was carried before the Committee at Peenpack and found Guilty of being an Enemy to these States, and from thence sent to a Committee in Pennsylvania to which state he belonged, for tryall, and upon his taking the Oath of Allegiance to the United States he was set at Liberty.

That immediately after that he went to the Indians; in a short time after that Returned and went to the Enemy at New York.

Captn. Tyler further says that he was sent to the Indians in a few days after Land left them, on Business to try to make peace, with them.

That the Indians told him that Land had been there and made a great complaint concerning the usage he had received from the Committee.

Captn. Tyler farther declares that a few days ago he heard LANDs Wife say that when he was searched for Letters in 1777 that he outwitted those who searched him by having a Letter concealed in his Ink Stand that was sent from General HOWE to the Commanding Officer at Niagara.

That he then told her she was as bad as her Husband and in his Opinion she had Letters from New York concealed, she declared that as God was her Judge she had not, that her Husband had him them for fear they would be found with him as he expected every Minute to be taken prisoner.

Defence: The prisoner says in his Defence that a certain Hugh JONES, John LORD and an Indian, came to his House in the Evening in April 1777.

That Jones told him that he was going to join BUTLER and BRANDT and that he intended to get the Indians to distroy the Frontiers, upon which he went with them to try to prevent their distroying the Country, on his way he met BRANDT who told him he had no Orders to distroy the Country and murder the Inhabitants except they were in arms against him, and although he was an Indian he Intended to convince the world that he was possessed with Humanity.

After that he returned Home to Coshithton where he remained, till the 21st February following and then being informed that the Indians were coming to distroy Coshithton, he went to New York to try to put a stop to their Depredations, after being there a few days was informed that the Inhabitants would kill him if he returned.

Upon which he concluded to stay in York, and immediately entered into the Kings Yard a Carpenter where he continued working till the last day February 1779.

He then left New York to go to see his Family which was about Twenty Miles west of Coshithton, and move them to Niagara.

That Genl. CLINTON who Commands the British Troops in New York desired him to carry a Letter to the commanding Officer at Niagara, which he refused.

The Genl. then desired him to inform the Commandant at Niagara, that it was his desire that the Indians should not be permitted to continue to ravage and distroy the Frontiers.

Sentence: The Court considering the Case of the prisoner, the Evidence against him, and his Defence are unanimously of Opinion, that he is Guilty of the Charges Exhibited against him, and do therefore Sentence him to suffer Death.

[signed] Eleazr. Lindsley Pres.

*** The Court Adjourn till tomorrow ten Oclock ***

19th March – The Court met according to adjournment.

Prisoner : Edward HICKS Brought before the Court charged with being a Spy, and carrying Intelligence to the Enemy Pleads not Guilty.

Evidence: Lieut. Bennet being sworn saith that about two years ago he heard the prisoner say that he would as willingly kill a Man that fought against the British Troops as kill a Dog.

Captain Spalding being Sworn saith at the Commencement of the present War he was acquainted with the prisoner, and that he had a Mind to engage in the Service of the United States, which he thinks he would have done, had he not been persuaded to the Reverse by his Father, and some other evil minded People.

Defence: The prisoner says in his Defence, that he was formerly an Inhabitant of Susquehannah.

That in April 1777 he left his Fathers House and went to Niagara in Company with about Sixty Tories where he continued about two months, then entered into the Batteaux Service to carry Provisions from Niagara to Oswego where he continued about six weeks, & upon hearing that General Washington had Issued a Proclamation Offering pardon to all those who had joined the Indians if they would Return to their Homes, he imediately set of[f] to return home, but coming in too late to receive the Benefit of the Proclamation was taken by some of the Militia and carried to Hartford in the state of Connecticut and there kept confined till Septr. 78, from thence sent to New York as a prisoner of War and Exchanged, entered into the service of the Enemy in the Commissaries Department till the last day of February 79, when he made his Escape from New York and that on his way to Niagara he was taken by a party of Militia near Coshithton the 24th Inst.

Sentence: The Court considering the Case of the Prisoner, the Evidence for and against him, and his Defence, are unanimously of Opinion that he is Guilty of being a Spy and do Sentence him to be kept in Close Confinement during the War.

Eleazr. Lindsley Pres.

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, Reel 56, 10 February 1779 — 25 March 1779.

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From the Quinte Branch of the UEL Assn, Newsletter for Spring 1995 (Vol.6 No.4) a page of undocumented Hicks information. The contributor was “Ealaine Lawlor”. She stated that in 1779 father Edward Hicks, and his son Edward, were captured by the Westmoreland Militia, and held at the Minisink Prison. Father was hanged outside his son’s cell, so the son plotted his escape. Feigning a stomach ailment he was let outside for some fresh air, and there he overpowered his guard, and went on an adventure to escape his captors. Eventually he made it back to British lines. Settlement

American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War were consdiered to be Loyalists. At the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King’s Men. When their cause was defeated, about 15% of the Loyalists (65,000–70,000 people) fled to other parts of the British Empire, to Britain itself, or to British North America (now Canada). Northern Loyalists largely migrated to Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. They called themselves United Empire Loyalists. Most were compensated with Canadian land or British cash distributed through formal claims procedures. Edward Hicks took advantage of the UEL land grant and settled in Marysburg, Prince Edward County, Ontario.

In 1789, Lord Dorchester, governor-in-chief of British North America, proclaimed that the Loyalists and their children should be allowed to add “UE” to their names, “alluding to their great principle, the Unity of Empire.” As a result, the phrase “United Empire Loyalist,” or UEL, was applied to Loyalists who migrated to Upper and Lower Canada.

In determining who among its subjects was eligible for compensation for war losses, Britain used a fairly precise definition: Loyalists were those born or living in the American colonies at the outbreak of the Revolution who rendered substantial service to the royal cause during the war, and who left the United States by the end of the war or soon after.

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We see that Edward Hicks Jr and (the rest of the family) removed to Upper Canada – Ontario.  Edward Jr is noted in the “History of the Settlement of Upper Canada (Ontario)” by Wm. Caniff, M.D., Toronto: Dudley & Burns Printers, Victoria Hall, 1869 (pgs 104 and 105).

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From “History of the Settlement of Upper Canada (Ontario)” by Wm. Caniff, M.D., Toronto: Dudley & Burns Printers, Victoria Hall, 1869 (pgs 104 and 105)

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What We Know About Edward The Spy

Husband: Edward HICKS Jr. (My 6x Great Uncle)

Born: ABT 1761 at: Dutchess Co, New York.  Married: ABT 1793 at: North Marysburgh, Prince Edward County, Ont Died: 11 Nov 1832 at: N. Marysburgh Twp, Prince Edward Co, Ontario.  Father: Edward “The Loyalist” HICKS. Mother: Elvina (Levina).


Wife: Deborah PRINGLE

Born: 28 Aug 1772 at: Skenesborough, Whitehall, New York.  Died: at: Father: Sgt. Timothy PRINGLE, SR (Loyalist). Mother: Huldah WELDON.


CHILDREN

Name: John HICKS Born: ABT 1794 at: N. Marysburgh Twp, Prince Edward Co, Ontario.   Married: 1828 at: Mulmur Twp, Dufferin Co, Ont. Died: ABT 1870 at: Mulmar Twp, Dufferin Co, Ontario. Spouses: Hannah Elizabeth HYNAMAN.


Name: Edward HICKS Born: 1796 at: Ontario.  Married: at: Died: at: Spouses: Lucretia MILLER TAYLOR.


SOURCES  1) Descendants of Edward, “The Loyalist,” Hicks   2) Beecher Family Genealogy

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Land Claims

From “Second Report of the Bureau of Archives for the Province of Ontario”, 1904, whichScreen Shot 2018-02-10 at 11.37.10 PM printed many of the investigations made by the government into the claims of the Loyalists. Claim # 441, made at Montreal on 6th March, 1788 (this is a verbatim transcript photocopied by Dale Halliday at the UEL Library in Toronto): (This claim is made by Ed, Jr on behalf of his father Ed. SR)

*** Evidence on the Claim of EDWARD HICKS, late of Susquehana, now of Pensilvania Cataraqui, Bay of Quinty. (note: probably means “late of Susquehana, Pensilvania, now of Catarqui, Bay of Quinty”; Cataraqui was the old name for Kingston ON, the nearest town to Marysburgh. D.H.)

Claimt (son, Edward Jr.) Sworn: Says he was in Butlers Rangers in 1783 & sent a claim to England by Capt. Gummersal. He is a native of America. In 1775 he lived on the Susquehana with his Father. He joined the British Army in 1777 & served the War in Butlers Rangers. He now resides at Bay of Quinty. The Claim is for his Father’s Property. He died 1780 at New York & had served in Butler’s Rangers. There are 5 Boys & 2 Girls alive, all in Canada. His Mother is alive & married to Joseph Wright in the Bay of Quinty. He had 600 Acres on the Susquehana. He bought it of the Pensilvania & Connecticut Claimts. before the War. He had 25 acres cleared. He can not tell who has it now. Lost his Stock, Farming Utensils, Furniture.

Wits. WILLIAM FRANKS Sworn: Remembers Ed. Hicks Lands. He had a farm on the Susquehana. He had considerable Clearance & a pretty large Stock of Cattle. The rebels took greatest part.

Wits. G. KENTNER Sworn: Hicks deceased was always Loyal; on the same title as the others there. He had 20 acres cleared & had a good Stock of Cattle & Horses. Claimt. is a good soldier.

April 25 Edward Hicks produces a paper signed by 2 of his Brs., Danl. & Joseph, agreeing that he shd. receive what is due to them & also answering for the younger Brs. & Sisters.”


I’m sure the Hicks have way more interesting history to offer us … I am going to continue my research down this line for sure!

Namaste

T xo