On Genealogy: MY Relation to Ezra CORNELL – Founder of Cornell University

I haven’t blogged in a long while, and while I’m at a dead end in another line of my tree, I decided to do more research on the Cornells. I wondered if it was the same “Cornell” that is synonymous with the Ivy League American University – Cornell.

My fifth cousin 6 times removed OR 7th great uncle’s second cousin twice removed whichever way you look at it, is Ezra Cornell (January 11, 1807 – December 9, 1874). He was an American businessman and education administrator. He was a founder of Western Union and a co-founder of Cornell University. He also served as President of the New York Agriculture Society and as a State Senator.

My relation to Ezra is two fold – direct blood line and in-law relationship as shown below:

Ezra was born in Westchester County, New York, the son of a potter, Elijah Cornell, and was raised near DeRuyter, New York. He was a first cousin, five times removed of Benjamin Franklin on his maternal grandmother’s side. He was also a cousin of Paul Cornell, the founder of Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. Having traveled extensively as a carpenter in New York State, Ezra, upon first setting eyes on Cayuga Lake and Ithaca, decided Ithaca would be his future home.

After settling in at Ithaca, NY, Ezra quickly went to work proving himself as a Carpenter. Colonel Beebe took notice of the industrious young man and made him the manager of his mill at Fall Creek.

Ezra Cornell was a birthright Quaker, but was later disowned by the Society of Friends for marrying outside of the faith to a world’s woman, a Methodist by the name of Mary Ann Wood. Ezra and Mary Ann were married March 19, 1831, in Dryden, New York.

On February 24, 1832, Ezra Cornell wrote the following response to his expulsion from The Society of Friends due to his marriage to Mary Ann Wood:

“I have always considered that choosing a companion for life was a very important affair and that my happiness or misery in this life depended on the choice”.

The young and growing family needed more income than could be earned as Manager of Beebe’s Mills. Having purchased rights in a patent for a new type of plow, Ezra began what would be decades of travelling away from Ithaca. His territories for sales of the plow were the states of Maine and Georgia. His plan was to sell in Maine in the summer and the milder Georgia in the winter. With limited means, what transported Ezra between the two states were his own two feet.

Connection to Morse Code & Western Union

Happening into the offices of the Maine Farmer in 1842, Cornell saw an acquaintance of his, one F.O.J. Smith, bent over some plans for a “scraper” as Smith called it. For services rendered, Smith had been granted a one-quarter share of the telegraph patent held by Samuel F.B. Morse, and was attempting to devise a way of burying the telegraph lines in the ground in lead pipe. Ezra’s knowledge of plows was put to the test and Ezra devised a special kind of plow that would dig a 2 feet 6 inches ditch, lay the pipe and telegraph wire in the ditch and cover it back up as it went. Later it was found that condensation in the pipes and poor insulation of the wires impeded the electrical current on the wires and so hanging the wire from telegraph poles became the accepted method. 

Cornell made his fortune in the telegraph business as an associate of Samuel Morse, having gained his trust by constructing and stringing the poles for the Baltimore–Washington telegraph line, the first telegraph line of substance, in the U.S. to address the problem of telegraph lines shorting out to the ground, Cornell invented the idea of using glass insulators at the point where telegraph lines are connected to supporting poles. After joining with Morse, Cornell supervised the erection of many telegraph lines, including a portion of the New York, Albany & Buffalo line in 1846 and the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company connecting Buffalo to Milwaukee with partners John James Speed and Francis Ormand Jonathan Smith. Cornell, Speed and Smith also built the New York and Erie line competing with and paralleling to the south the New York, Albany and Buffalo line in which Morse had a major share. The line was completed in 1849 and Cornell was made president of the company.

Cornell’s sister, Phoebe, married Martin B. Wood and moved to Albion, Michigan, in 1848. Cornell gave Wood a job constructing new lines and made Phoebe his telegraph operator, the first woman operator in the United States.

Cornell earned a substantial fortune when the Erie and Michigan was consolidated with Hiram Sibley and his New York and Mississippi Company to form the Western Union company. Cornell received two million in Western Union stock.

Ezra made his fortune in the telegraph business as an associate of Samuel Morse (yes, that Morse as in Morse Code – Samuel F.B. Morse who developed an electric telegraph and then invented, with his friend Alfred Vail, the Morse Code  in 1838) , having gained his trust by constructing and stringing the telegraph poles between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland, as the first ever telegraph line of substance in the U.S. To address the problem of telegraph lines shorting out to the ground, Cornell invented the idea of using glass insulators at the point where telegraph lines are connected to supporting poles. After joining with Morse, Cornell supervised the erection of many telegraph lines, including the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company connecting Buffalo to Milwaukee. He earned a substantial fortune as a founder of the Western Union company.

Member of Republic Party

Cornell was a Republican member of the New York State Assembly (Tompkins Co.) in 1862 and 1863; and of the New York State Senate from 1864 to 1867, sitting in the 87th, 88th, 89th and 90th New York State Legislatures.

Cornell University and Free Library

Cornell retired from Western Union and turned his attention to philanthropy. He endowed the Cornell Library, a public library for the citizens of Ithaca. A lifelong enthusiast of science and agriculture, he saw great opportunity in the 1862 Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act to found a university that would teach practical subjects on an equal basis with the classics favored by more traditional institutions. Andrew Dickson White helped secure the new institution’s status as New York’s land grant university, and Cornell University was granted a charter through their efforts in 1865.

This bronze statue of Ezra Cornell by Hermon Atkins MacNeil was erected on the university’s Arts Quad in 1919.

Cornell University derived far greater revenues than earlier land grant colleges, largely from real estate transactions directed by Ezra Cornell. Under the land-grant program, the Federal government issued the colleges scrip, documents granting the right to select a parcel of land. These colleges generally promptly sold their scrip. Ezra Cornell, on the other hand held most of the scrip, anticipating it would increase in price.He also redeemed some scrip for promising land or for rights in timber, most notably pine forest in Wisconsin. While the first land-grant colleges received around half a dollar per acre, Cornell netted an average of over five dollars per acre in 1905. 

Later Life

Ezra Cornell entered the railroad business, but fared poorly due to the Panic of 1873. He began construction of a palatial Ithaca mansion, Llenroc (Cornell spelled in reverse) to replace his farmhouse, Forest Home, but died before it was completed. Llenroc was maintained by Cornell’s heirs for several decades until being sold to the local chapter of the Delta Phi fraternity, which occupies it to this day; Forest Home was sold to the Delta Tau Delta chapter and later demolished. Cornell is interred in Sage Chapel on Cornell’s campus, along with Daniel Willard Fiske and Jennie McGraw.

Llenroc, home of Ezra Cornell

A prolific letter writer, Ezra corresponded with a great many people and would write dozens of letters each week. This was due partly to his wide travelling, and also to the many business associates he maintained during his years as an entrepreneur and later as a politician and university founder. Cornell University has made the approximately 30,000 letters in the Cornell Correspondence available online.

His eldest son, Alonzo B. Cornell, was later governor of New York. Since its founding, the University’s charter specified that the eldest lineal descendent of Cornell is granted a life seat on Cornell University’s Board of Trustees. Since Ezra Cornell IV took the post on November 17, 1969, the law was amended from specifying the “eldest male lineal descendent.”

In 1990, G. David Low, graduate of Cornell University and Space Shuttle astronaut, took with him into outer space a pair of tan silk socks worn by Ezra Cornell on his wedding day in 1831.

Honestly, I can’t even get over how a commoner like myself has so much history in her blood, her roots. If you haven’t had the chance, take a look at my other ancestral connections – too many to name. I’m again floored that his ONE LINE in my tree to America has yielded so many amazing finds.

Genealogy is my passion, I can’t wait to see who else I’m connected to. Stay tuned and follow for more …..

Rh- Alien Blood,Royal Blue Bloods and My Linage to King John I

Before getting into the meat of this post, it’s important to understand blood typing. Interestingly, 85% of the world’s population are Rh+ and only 15% are Rh-. Most of us don’t know our blood type (if you don’t, I strongly encourage you to find out, it’s so important, especially if you require a blood transfusion). I’ve known for many years, as it affected my pregnancies, I’m O-, I’ll explain why this is important a few paragraphs down.  

In 1937, Karl Landsteiner and Alexander Weiner discovered the Rh factor. Rh or rhesus protein is named for the rhesus monkey, which also carries the gene, and is a protein that lives on the surface of red blood cells. Their discovery thus changed the blood types from the four we knew A, B, AB, and O, to the eight we know today. They discovered the Rh protein while researching solutions for a medical mystery that killed dozens of babies each day. Their discovery led to the development of the RhoGAM® injection in 1968, which is used to prevent an immune response in mothers who are Rh-. If a pregnant woman who is Rh- does not receive RhoGAM, and is carrying an Rh-positive baby (which I was), she risks the health of future pregnancies because she has been exposed to the positive blood from her current unborn baby.  When a woman receives the RhoGAM shot, it protects her immune system from the exposure to the current baby’s Rh+ blood. If she does not receive the injection, her body will develop antibodies that could attack the positive red blood cells of babies in subsequent pregnancies.

Many months ago, I saw some posts come across my timeline proposing a theory that people with Rh- blood possess “alien DNA” since studies found that Rh- blood types do not have the key evolutionary gene from rhesus monkeys that most other humans do. This begs the question: if we evolved from monkeys, why would some people not have the rhesus monkey gene?

Looking back about 35,000 years, scientists believe that the blood type is linked to specific tribes/groups in France and northern Spain, mainly the Basque Region of France, who have the greatest incidents of this blood type at 35%.

The other day I was watching Kendall Rae’s YouTube channel (I’m addicted) and in came an episode about Rh Negative Blood Being Alien. She and her boyfriend, Josh, explained that most of the US Presidents possess Rh- blood and that it’s also a characteristic of the British Royal Family.  What’s interesting here is that all are distant cousins can be traced back a common ancestor, same for the US Presidents (except for one) – they’re all related to King John I.  As soon as I heard the name Plantagenet, I stopped the video and went back to my family tree on ancestry.ca. I had heard that name before, and then I found it in my relation to Louis VIII of France, click here to read that blog, I had just written a blog about him not too long ago.

Back in 2012 a 12 year old girl named BridgeAnne d’Avignon discovered that all U.S. presidents but for Martin van Buren are blood related. They are descendants of the same English king, John Lackland Plantagenet who is perhaps best known as Robin Hood’s enemy, and was the King who signed the Magna Carta in 1215.  Now if you’re not familiar with the Plantagenet’s, they are a dynasty that ruled England from 1154 to 1485. The dynasty was founded by Geoffrey Plantagenet (d: 1151), Count of Anjou. Approximately 190 seventeenth-century North American colonists were from the Plantagenet dynasty.  

I find this all wildly fascinating!  First the whole theory on Rh- blood, although far fetched, is quite intriguing. Then the fact that all, except for 1 US President is a descendent of King John I.  More so the whole fascination that truly boggles my mind is that I am Rh- and that I also have lineage going back to King John I (he’s my 25th great-grand uncle), which means in some way, shape or form, I’m related to the majority of the US Presidents (I’d already discovered that I am the 6th cousin 5x removed of President Abraham Lincoln).

What I find even more astounding is the connection between the Rh- factor and the lineage to this royal line (which to some degree, even if by lineage seems to be still in power).  Scientists cannot determine the root of the Rh- blood type, citing a random genetic mutation (which is possible). I do query (even in the Gaia scope) if some of humanity (myself included) are the product of an ancient and advanced alien civilization. I mean, if the theory of evolution is valid in that each and every one of us is descended from ancient primates, shouldn’t we all be Rh+?

Some speculation surrounding alien DNA is that the Sumerians believed in an ancient extra terrestrial race, the Anunnaki, who genetically engineered humans who were here at that time.  Over 6,000 years ago, the world’s first civilization was recording stories of strange celestial Gods whom they believed came from the heavens to create mankind. 

The Sumerians were highly intelligent, amongst other things, they essentially “invented” time by dividing day and night into 12-hour periods, hours into 60 minutes, and minutes into 60 seconds. If they were responsible for many of the most important innovations, inventions, and concepts of present day, why would they imagine or invent stories surrounding the Anunnaki?

Most historians leave this to mythology, the same way they do the Greek Gods. Some researchers believe the Anunnaki may have been actual beings. So it’s possible that Rh- people are direct relatives of the Anunnaki.

Do these Royals and the rest of us Rh- blood possess alien blood? Genetic mutation or alien connection?

Hmmmm ….

On Genealogy: MY ROYAL CONNECTION to King Louis VIII of France

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I always thought I was special, a Princess you might say, and now I have a little weight behind me to back it up, my 24th great grand-father was King Louis VIII of France. And this discovery, has just set my whole genealogical dig in a whole new wild direction; an astronomical connection all the way back the the Plantagenets (The House of the Plantagenets), the royal dynasty that ruled England for over 300 years.

I came across this discovery as I followed a line on my father’s, paternal side down the Rancourts (see below for exact linage), I was following back my great gramma Angelina Mullen’s line – I don’t even recall how I ended up at Louis VIII, bypassing all of the previous royals.

In all honesty, I knew very little about my 24x GGF. From what I’ve researched Louis VIII the Lion (aka Louis VIII le Lion) (5 September 1187 – 8 November 1226) was King of France from 1223 to 1226 (only a short 3 years). Louis VIII was born in Paris, the son of King Philip II of France and Isabelle of Hainaut, from whom he inherited the County of Artois at Palais Royal, Paris, France.

As I mentioned above, Louis VIII was the son and heir to the great King Philip II, a man who was able to, with the help of his frail yet competent son, to substantially extend royal influence within France.  

In summer 1195, a marriage between Louis and Eleanor of Brittany, niece of Richard I of England, was suggested for an alliance between Philip II and Richard, but it failed. It is said that the Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI opposed the marriage, and that its failure was a sign that Richard would name his brother John as heir to the English throne instead of Eleanor’s younger brother Arthur of Brittany, whom Richard had designated earlier as heir presumptive.

On 23 May 1200, at the age of 12, Louis was married to Blanche of Castile, daughter of King Alfonso VIII of Castile and Eleanor of England, the sister of King Richard I and King John I of England. The marriage could only be concluded after prolonged negotiations between King Philip II of France and Blanche’s uncle John.

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Born to wealth, Blanche of Castile (1188-1252) took the reins of leadership early in life as the wife of Louis VIII and later as co-regent during her son, Louis IX’s, minority — Blanche proved to be a good, strong willed leader, keenly adept at dealing with her male counterparts.

Blanche was born on March 4, 1188 in Palencia, Castile, an area that is now part of central and northern Spain. She was the daughter of King Alphonso VIII of Castile and Princess Eleanor Plantagenet of England. Her grandfather was Henry II of England, her grandmother was Eleanor of Aquitaine and her uncle was John I of England. This rich lineage prepared her well for a place on the throne of France.

Louis VIII succeeded his father on 14 July 1223; his coronation took place on 6 August of the same year in the cathedral at Reims.

Meanwhile in 1215, King John of England was forced to sign the Magna Carta stating that the King was not above the law of the land and protecting the rights of the people. Today, the Magna Carta is considered one of the most important documents in the history of democracy. After King John had been forced to sign the Magna Carta, the nobility was still mistrustful of their King, thinking he would appeal to Pope Innocent III for aid in regaining what he had lost. Having failed to control John, the barons took an unprecedented step and decided to overthrow him. The English barons rebelled against the unpopular King John in the First Barons’ War. England needed a King, but who?

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The barons needed a strong, experienced man and of royal blood; they looked across the English channel and found one in Louis VIII.  He was after all the son of the French King Philip Augustus (II), AND he was also a direct descendant of William the Conqueror (OMG, another exciting find and one that I need to research!) and married to King John’s niece, both of which gave him a passable blood claim to the English throne. But more than this, he had the resources to mount a campaign, the men to run it and the skills to win it. He was renowned as a brilliant warrior and was known to be honest, just, moral and a man of his word – all the things that John wasn’t.

On 14 June 1216, Louis captured Winchester and soon controlled over half of the English kingdom. But just when it seemed that England was his, King John’s death in October 1216 of dysentery, caused many of the rebellious barons to desert Louis in favour of John’s nine-year-old son, Henry III.

With the Earl of Pembroke acting as regent, a call for the English “to defend our land” against the French led to a reversal of fortunes on the battlefield. After his army was beaten at the Battle of Lincoln on 20 May 1217 and his naval forces were defeated at the Battle of Sandwich on 24 August 1217, Louis was forced to make peace on English terms. In 1216 and 1217, Prince Louis also tried to conquer Dover Castle, but without success. The principal provisions of the Treaty of Lambeth were an amnesty for English rebels, a pledge from Louis not to attack England again, and 10,000 marks to be given to Louis. In return for this payment, Louis agreed he had never been the legitimate king of England.

He returned to France, where he dedicated a majority of the rest of his life to crusading for the Catholic cause. Teaming with the Englishman Simon de Montfort, Louis battled against Count Raymond VI of Toulouse, and then his son, Raymond VII, and their religious sect, the Cathars. After nearly ten years of sporadic battles, and huge victories and losses on both sides, Louis arose victorious and extended royal power further into southern France. His biggest accomplishment during his short reign was the conquest of the county of Poitou, which had long been under English control. One could not have expected more as a general and leader than what was received by Prince, and then King, Louis. 

While returning to Paris, King Louis VIII became ill with dysentry and died on 8 November 1226 at Château de Montpensier in Auvergne.

The Saint Denis Basilica, just to the north of Paris, houses the tomb of Louis VIII. His son, Louis IX (1226–70), succeeded him on the throne. Queen Blanche concluded the crusade in the south in 1229.

My Lineage:

LOUIS VIII – KING OF FRANCE 1187-1226

24th great-grandfather

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Robert I (Count of Artois)

Son of LOUIS VIII – KING OF FRANCE

(Robert I 25 September 1216 – 8 February 1250, called the Good, was the first Count of Artois, a Prince of France, and the fifth (and second surviving) son of Louis VIII, King of France and Blanche of Castile. On 14 June 1237 Robert married Matilda, daughter of Henry II of Brabant and Marie of Hohenstaufen. They had two children: Blanche (1248–1302)[ Robert II (1250–1302), who succeeded to Artois).

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Robert II (Count of Artois)

Son of Robert I de France (Count of Artois)

(Robert II September 1250 – 11 July 1302, was the Count of Artois, the posthumous son and heir of Robert I and Matilda of Brabant. He was a nephew of Louis IX of France. He died at the Battle of the Golden Spurs.

In 1262 in Paris Robert married Amicie de Courtenay (1250–1275), daughter of Pierre de Courtenay, Seigneur de Conches, a great-grandson of Louis VI, and Perronelle de Joigny. They had three children:Mahaut (1268–1329), Philip (1269–1298), Robert (born 1271, died young).

After Amicie’s death, Robert married twice more: first, in 1277, to Agnes of Dampierre (1237–1288), heiress of Bourbon, and then, on 18 October 1298 to Margaret (died 1342),daughter of John II, Count of Hainaut. After Robert’s death, his daughter Mahaut inherited Artois, but his grandson Robert III unsuccessfully tried to claim it.

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Pilippe I, (Count of Artois)

Son of Robert II (Count of Artois)

(Philip of Artois 1269 – 11 September 1298 was the son of Robert II of ArtoisCount of Artois, and Amicie de Courtenay.  He was the Lord of ConchesNonancourt, and Domfront. He married Blanche of Brittany, daughter of John II, Duke of Brittany, and had the following children:Margaret (1285–1311), who married in 1301 Louis, Count of Évreux, Robert III of Artois (1287–1342), Isabelle (1288–1344), a nun at Poissy, Joan of Artois (1289 – aft. 1350), married Gaston ICount of Foix, in Senlis in 1301, Othon (died 2 November 1291), Marie of Artois (1291 – 22 January 1365, Wijnendaele), Lady of Merode, married in 1309 in Paris to John I, Marquis of Namur, Catherine (1296–1368, Normandy), married John II of Ponthieu, Count of Aumale.

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Marie of Artois

Daughter of Pilippe I, Count of Artois

(Marie of Artois – born in 1291, was the fourth daughter of Philip of Artois and Blanche of Brittany. John’s second wife was Marie of Artois (later to become Lady of Merode). They were married in Paris on 6 March 1310, confirmed Poissy, January 1313. John granted her as dower the castle of Wijnendale in Flanders, ratified by the Count of Flanders (his half-brother, Robert III) in 1313.

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Marie of Namur
Gräfin von Vianden
Dame de Pierrepont
1322 –
before 29 October 1357
Married firstly, in 1335/36, to Henry II, Graf of Vianden, son of Philip II, Graf of Vianden and his first wife Lucia von der Neuerburg. Her first husband was murdered at Famagusta in September 1337.

Married secondly (1340, dispensation 9 September 1342) to her father’s second cousin, Theobald of Bar, Seigneur de Pierrepont, son of Erard of Bar, Seigneur de Pierrepont et d’Ancerville (himself son of Theobald II of Bar), and his wife Isabelle of Lorraine (daughter of Theobald II, Duke of Lorraine).

Marie gave birth to two daughters, Yolande and Elisabeth. When Theobald, died (between 2 August 1353 and 6 July 1354) he had no legitimate male heir, thus his daughter Elisabeth became the heiress of Bar-Pierrepont.

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Yolande de Bar

Daughter of Marie of Namur

(Yolande de Bar (b. c. 1343 – d. c. 1410)  married before 1360 with Eudes VII, Sire de Grancey, Louvois, Pierrepont. Yolande de Bar, dame de Pierrepont, and Eudes VII de Grancey, chevalier, councilor and chamberlain of the king of France, probably married between 1350 and 1355

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Jeanne de Grancey -1422

Daughter of Yolande de Bar

(Jeanne de Grancey, dame of Louvois and of Pierrepont, and Jean II de Châteauvillain,
seigneur of Thil, Châteauvillain, and Marigny, married about 1372

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Marie (Dame de Louvais) de Chateauvillain 1380-1423

Daughter of Jeanne de Grancey

( Marie de Châteauvillain, dame of Louvois, and Amé de Sarrebruche, seigneur of Commercy and of Venisy, married 27 September 1396)

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Robert I de Sarrebruche

Son of Marie (Dame de Louvais) de Chateauvillain

(Robert I de Sarrebruche, lord of Commercy, and Jeanne, countess of Roucy and of Braine. Jeanne de Saarbrücken (born de PIERREPONT) (she is a descendant of Henry III, king of England), married around 1414-1417 at Braine)

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Jeanne de Sarrebruche 1436-1492

(Jeanne de Sarrebruche and Christophe de Barbançon, seigneur of Canny-sur-Matz,
married about 1463)

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Francois Seigneur De Barbancon De La Ferte

Son of Jeanne de Sarrebruche

(François de Barbançon, seigneur of La Ferté, and Françoise de Villers, dame of Montgobert, probably married between 1490 and before 26 May 1507 (and not on 20 October 1511 as reported in several publications)

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Maguerite (Dame de Montgobert) de Barbancon 1490-

Daughter of Francois Seigneur De Barbancon De La Ferte

(Marguerite de Barbançon, dame of Montgobert, and Robert de Joyeuse, count of Grandpré, married 15 July 1519)

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Francois De Joyeuse 1507-1597

Son of Maguerite (Dame de Montgobert) de Barbancon

(François de Joyeuse, seigneur of Champigneulle, and Nicole Françoise de Beauvais,
probably married between 1530 and 1540)

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Jean (seigneur de Champigneulle) De Joyeuse 1540-

Son of Francois De Joyeuse

(Jean de Joyeuse, seigneur of Champigneulle, and Nicole des Ancherins, dame of Cierges and Bantheville in part, heiress of Sivry, marriage contract 31 December 1561, married January 1563)

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Louise De Joyeuse 1562-1616

Daughter of Jean (seigneur de Champigneulle) De Joyeuse

(Louise de Joyeuse, dame of Sivry, and Charles de Longeuval, sieur of Ormes, seigneur of part of Sivry and of Walicourt, married about 1581)

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Antoinette De Longuevale 1581-1639

Daughter of Louise De Joyeuse

(Antoinette de Longueval and Guillaume Couvent, married before 1601, probably at or near Épieds). The Couvent’s were non-armigerous (i.e. did not bear heraldic arms, did not have a coat of arms)

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Anne Couvent 1601-1675

Daughter of Antoinette De Longuevale

(Anne Couvent and Philippe Amiot, married about 1625, probably at or near Épieds (Aisne) Picardy). The Amiot’s were non-armigerous (i.e. did not bear heraldic arms, did not have a coat of arms)

Anne Couvent came to New France from Picardy with her husband Philippe Amiot / Hameau and two sons, Jean and Mathieu, in 1636. A third child, Charles, was born in New France. In addition, her nephew, Toussaint Ledran, the son of Louis Ledran and Charlotte Couvent, also settled in New France. Many Canadians and Americans descend from one of the Couvent sisters and thus from royalty.

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Mathieu Amiot 1628-1688

Son of Anne Couvent

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Catherine Ursule Amiot 1664-1715

Daughter of Mathieu Amiot

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Marie-Françoise Duquet dit Desrochers 1699-1743

Daughter of Catherine Ursule Amiot

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Charles Alexandre Rancourt 1729-1774

Son of Marie-Françoise Duquet dit Desrochers

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Louis Rancourt 1807-1847

Son of Charles Alexandre Rancourt

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Olive Rancourt 1847-1895

Daughter of Louis Rancourt

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Bridget Angelina Mullen 1887-1976

Daughter of Olive Rancourt

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Benjamin George Richards 1916-1977

Son of Bridget Angelina Mullen

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Patrick James Richards 1954-2014

Son of Benjamin George Richards

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Tina Rose Richards

You are the daughter of Patrick James Richards

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So it seems my royal lineage stopped with the marriage of Antoinette de Longueval and Guillaume Couvent. She came from the family of Louise de Joyeuse, dame of Sivry, and Charles de Longeuval, sieur of Ormes, seigneur of part of Sivry and of Walicourt. Guillaume had no coat of arms. Why would have Antoinette marry outside of royalty, was it for love? The end of her familial dynasty? More research to be done …. I will be writing a whole different blog on Anne Couvent and her famous lineage – stay tuned!

Also interesting that I am related to Louis VIII in another way via my dad’s line via Olive Moore’s line as follows:

Louis VIII le Lion, roi de France is Patrick James Richards’ 25th great grandfather, therefore my 26x GGF through this line.

Patrick James Richards
 

Benjamin George Richards
his father

Ambrose Richards
his father

George Howard Richards
his father

Olive Moore
his mother

Roger Moore
her father

Dudley Moore, Sr.
his father

Jedediah Moore
his father

Jonathan Moore
his father

Sarah Moore
his mother

Sarah Pinney
her mother

Edward Griswold, of Killingworth
her father

George Griswold, of Kenilworth
his father

Roger Griswold
his father

William Griswold
his father

Roger Griswold
his father

Joan Griswold (Stockley)
his mother

Joane Stockley
her mother

Thomas Wells
her father

John Welles
his father

Thomas Welles
his father

Eleanor Alianore de Mowbray, Baroness Welles
his mother

John de Mowbray, 4th Baron of Mowbray
her father

Joan of Lancaster, Baroness de Mowbray
his mother

Henry of Lancaster
her father

Blanche of Artois
his mother

Robert I the Good, count of Artois
her father

Louis VIII le Lion, roi de France
his father

I also find it insanely interesting that my family lineage forms part of the world’s most renowned plays! To think that William Shakespeare’s play The Life and Death of King John, has my actual 24x and 25x great grand fathers.

I think it may be safe to say that The Life and Death of King John which dramatizes the reign of John, King of England, his son of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine and father of Henry III of England

My Family Tree of Characters in King John are Blanche of Castile – John’s niece, King Philip II  King of France and Louis who is called Louis the Dauphin — ironically, I lived in Dauphin, Manitoba for 2 years.

Synopsis:

King John receives an ambassador from France who demands with a threat of war that he renounce his throne in favour of his nephew, Arthur, whom the French King Philip believes to be the rightful heir to the throne.

John adjudicates an inheritance dispute between Robert Faulconbridge and his older brother Philip the Bastard, during which it becomes apparent that Philip is the illegitimate son of King Richard I. Queen Eleanor, mother to both Richard and John, recognizes the family resemblance and suggests that he renounce his claim to the Faulconbridge land in exchange for a knighthood. John knights Philip the Bastard under the name Richard.

In France, King Philip and his forces besiege the English-ruled town of Angers, threatening attack unless its citizens support Arthur. Philip is supported by Austria, who many characters believe to have killed King Richard. The English contingent arrives; and then Eleanor trades insults with Constance, Arthur’s mother. Kings Philip and John stake their claims in front of Angers’ citizens, but to no avail: their representative says that they will support the rightful king, whoever that turns out to be.

The French and English armies clash, but no clear victor emerges. Each army dispatches a herald claiming victory, but Angers’ citizens continue to refuse to recognize either claimant because neither army has proven victorious.

The Bastard proposes that England and France unite to punish the rebellious citizens of Angers, at which point the citizens propose an alternative: Philip’s son, Louis the Dauphin, should marry John’s niece Blanche (a scheme that gives John a stronger claim to the throne) while Louis gains territory for France. Though a furious Constance accuses Philip of abandoning Arthur, Louis and Blanche are married.

Cardinal Pandolf arrives from Rome bearing a formal accusation that John has disobeyed the Pope and appointed an archbishop contrary to his desires. John refuses to recant, whereupon he is excommunicated. Pandolf pledges his support for Louis, though Philip is hesitant, having just established family ties with John. Pandolf brings him round by pointing out that his links to the church are older and firmer.

War breaks out; Austria is beheaded by the Bastard in revenge for his father’s death; and both Angers and Arthur are captured by the English. Eleanor is left in charge of English possessions in France, while the Bastard is sent to collect funds from English monasteries. John orders Hubert to kill Arthur. Pandolf suggests to Louis that he now has as strong a claim to the English throne as Arthur (and indeed John), and Louis agrees to invade England.

Hubert finds himself unable to kill Arthur. John’s nobles urge Arthur’s release. John agrees, but is wrong-footed[ by Hubert’s announcement that Arthur is dead. The nobles, believing he was murdered, defect to Louis’ side. Equally upsetting, and more heartbreaking to John, is the news of his mother’s death, along with that of Lady Constance. The Bastard reports that the monasteries are unhappy about John’s attempt to seize their gold. Hubert has a furious argument with John, during which he reveals that Arthur is still alive. John, delighted, sends him to report the news to the nobles.

Arthur dies jumping from a castle wall. (It is open to interpretation whether he deliberately kills himself or just makes a risky escape attempt.) The nobles believe he was murdered by John, and refuse to believe Hubert’s entreaties. John attempts to make a deal with Pandolf, swearing allegiance to the Pope in exchange for Pandolf’s negotiating with the French on his behalf. John orders the Bastard, one of his few remaining loyal subjects, to lead the English army against France.

While John’s former noblemen swear allegiance to Louis, Pandolf explains John’s scheme, but Louis refuses to be taken in by it. The Bastard arrives with the English army and threatens Louis, but to no avail. War breaks out with substantial losses on each side, including Louis’ reinforcements, who are drowned during the sea crossing. Many English nobles return to John’s side after a dying French nobleman, Melun, warns them that Louis plans to kill them after his victory.

John is poisoned by a disgruntled monk. His nobles gather around him as he dies. The Bastard plans the final assault on Louis’ forces, until he is told that Pandolf has arrived with a peace treaty. The English nobles swear allegiance to John’s son Prince Henry, and the Bastard reflects that this episode has taught that internal bickering could be as perilous to England’s fortunes as foreign invasion.

————————————————————————————————-

My mind is blown!  Never in my wildest dreams did I expect to trace my heritage back to a King, more less a whole line of significantly historic Royals on both sides of the channel – the French and the English – my family is steeped in so much rich history. 

I cannot wait to get exploring more — King Phillip, King Louis XI and Blanche’s family, King Alphonso VIII of Castile and Princess Eleanor Plantagenet of England. Her grandfather was Henry II of England, her grandmother was Eleanor of Aquitaine and her uncle was John I of England.

(photo header: King John of England in battle with the Francs (left), Prince Louis VIII of France on the march (right). (British Library, Royal 16 G VI f. 385)

On Genealogy: The Loyalist, The Spy and The American Revolution

I took a bit of a break from my close relatives because I found another interesting leaf hint and decided to follow it.  I saw this one before, but, I felt I would have to do a lot of research so I passed.  Then I came across something else on the same person and decided to go with it … it might be interesting — and it was.

For this story, you’ll have to put on your history caps and go with me all the way back to the American Revolution.  Now, I am Canadian – I haven’t studied American history in depth but we did certainly cover it in grade 11 world history.

The American Revolution (1775-83) which is also referred to as the American Revolutionary War OR the U.S. War of Independence was essentially a civil war based on who would rule in the Thirteen Colonies. France entered the American Revolution on the side of the colonists in 1778, turning what had essentially been a civil war into an international conflict. After French assistance helped the Continental Army force the British surrender at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781, the Americans had effectively won their independence, though fighting would not formally end until 1783.

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My Connection to The Loyalist and The Spy

Edward Hicks Sr. + Elvina Cornell (Gen 6)

See below for story of Edward Hicks – The Loyalist

|

Joseph Hicks + Elizabeth Loose (Gen 1)

( Joseph Hicks was born in  1767 in Albany, NY, and died in 1815 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada).  

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U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records in Selected States, 1639-19 New YorkSchenectady – Schenectady Marriages, Vol 5, Book 45

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Sarah Hicks 1775-1872
Daughter of Joseph Hicks
Olive Moore 1821-1871
Daughter of Sarah Hicks
Ambrose Richards 1885-1957
Son of George Howard Richards
Benjamin George Richards 1916-1977
Son of Ambrose Richards
Patrick James Richards 1954-2014
Son of Benjamin George Richards
|
Tina Rose Richards
You are the daughter of Patrick James Richards

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More About Edward Hicks Sr. My 6x Great Grand Father – The Loyalist

Edward Hicks was born on May 2, 1736, in Suffolk, New York, USA.

Edward married Elizabeth Elvina Levina Cornell in 1758 at the age of 22 in New York.  Elizabeth is the daughter of Samuel Mott Cornell and Hannah Cornwall.

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Children of Edward and Elvina:
1 – 1759 his son Benjamin Hicks was born in Long Island, NY, died in 1835 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward, Ontario, Canada.
2 – 1760 his son Edward (The Spy) Hicks was born in Albany, NY, died in 1832 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward, Ontario, Canada.
3 – 1762 his daughter Mary Hicks was born in Albany, New York, died in 1804 in Athens, Leeds, Ontario, Canada
4 – 1765 his son David Hicks was born in Albany New York.
5 – 1767 his son Joseph Hicks was born in Albany, NY, and died in 1815 in Marysburgh, Prince Edwards, Ontario, Canada.
6 – 1769 his son Daniel Hicks was born in Albany, NY. and died in 1821 in Hallowell, Ontario, Canada.
7 -1771 his daughter Elizabeth Hicks was born in Albany, NY. her death was in 1807.
8 -1774 his son Joshua Hicks was born in Sugar Run, Bradford Cty, PA., died in 1838 in Marysburgh, Prince Edwards, Ontario, Canada.

He was a member of the Society of Friends.  He was a Quaker.

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U.S. Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935

—– 1771
Location: Wyoming County, Pennsylvania
Description: George Kentnor, Edward Hicks, Jacob Bowman, John Secord Retrieved From: Ancestry.ca History of Bradford County, Pennsylvania: with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers Chapter III. Settlements in Bradford County previous to the Battle of Wyoming, July 8, 1778 pages 67-68

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Edward Hicks was an entrepeneur who not only settled on the frontier, but was also actively involved in organizing settlements in the frontier. The Hicks’ had 600 acres of frontier lands on the Susquehannah.  He was one of the principle organizers, becoming in the process the first white settler in Wilmot Township, Bradbury County PA.

—–There is also evidence that Edward developed land in New York, especially with George Hicks in that part of New York which ultimately became part of New Hampshire. He may have done this also around Dutchess County.  The Susquehannah lands were part of the Connecticut and Pennsylvania lands settlement. The indications are that those enterprises in which Edward Hicks was involved were on a very large scale.

—-There is much debate on who Edward’s parents are.  The one I’ve seen online from a John Hicks – is that he is a descendant of Thomas Hicks.  How does an ordinary farm boy learn to do this all of this development? From whence the inspiration? It would certainly help if your grandfather were Thomas Hicks, land developer and Judge, whose activities in developing vast acreages of land are well documented. Thomas of course was Isaac’s father and this activity of Edward, so resembles that of Thomas Hicks.

—- We do know that he took his entire family including his wife Levina and eight children into the Pennsylvania wilderness in 1775, built a home and cleared land, and fed and clothed them and all of them survived.

—–In about March of 1777, before the breakup of the ice in the Susquehannah he and his two oldest sons joined with other loyalists along the river to travel from their homestead at the mouth of the Sugar Run (across from present day Wyalusing PA) with horses to Fort Niagara (Near present day Lewiston NY).

—–At the end of the summer’s campaign the Susquehannah men in Butler’s Rangers received permission to return to the Susquehannah to evacuate their families. Edward Hicks was among these and was captured by the Westmoreland militia as he was nearing home in late December 1777 or early January 1778. He remained in custody until his death in 1778 or 1779. There are accounts of both years. I am inclined to accept 1778 as it appears that Levina remarried in September of 1779.

—–Before the War, Edward Hicks’s home was known to be a safe house for loyalists to King George (Tories) as they made their way from Philadelphia into the interior, even to the Ohio valley. George Washington was not very pleased about this.

—–When in 1779 General Sullivan was ordered to take an army of 10,000 men up the Susquehannah to destroy the Indian villages and any remants of the Tories and their homesteads he is said to have stopped outside of Wyalusing in mid September. There is no doubt that the Hicks homestead received a special inspection and treatment at that time.

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Screen Shot 2018-02-10 at 6.56.10 PMI was able to locate an extract of their companies.

Per the Revolutionary War Records Edwd Hicks Senr, was listed as a Private paid  £ 30.8 at the rate of 2 shillings per day for 204 days of service from Dec 25 1777 to October 24 1778 (Pay Rolls of Butler’s Rangers 1777-1778).

Benjamin Hicks was listed as a Private in Captain William Caldwell’s Company of Butler’s Rangers paid £30.8 at the rate of 2 shillings per day for 304 days of service from 25 Dec 1777 to 24 Oct 1778. (Pay Rolls of Butler’s Rangers 1777-1778)

Edwd Hicks Junr, Private, taken on the Susquehana Jany 1778, named in “A List of Persons in the hands of the Congress belonging to the Corps of Rangers, Royalists & their Families”.  He was listed in Private Captain William Caldwell’s Coy of Butler’s Rangers and paid at the rate of 2 shillings per day for 304 days of service from December 25 1777 to 1778 (Pay Rolls of Butler’s Rangers 1777-1778).  He was taken prisoner 3rd of January 1778, returned and present at Muster 5th November 1779  £377.3 (Pay to Rangers taken prisoner and casualties).

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Butler’s Rangers –  Walter Butler’s Coy.

[Extract]

We the undermentioned Commissioned & non Commissioned Officers & Privates of Captain Walter BUTLER’s Company of Rangers do acknowledge to have received from John BUTLER Esqr. Major Commandant of the Corps of Rangers the full amount of our Pay from 24th December 1777 to 24th October 1778 inclusive.

commencing Ending
Captain Walter BUTLER 25 Decr. 1777 24 Octr. 1778
1st Lieutenant Andrew THOMPSON      do      do
2d Lieutenant Philip FREY      do 21 May 1778
Sgt Moses MOUNTAIN      do 24 Octr. 1778
Sgt Randle McDANNEL      do      do
Sgt Lewis MABEE      do      do
Cpl Henry PUTNAM      do      do
Cpl Thomas McCORMICK 25 June 1778      do
Cpl Jacob FREDERICK 25 Decr. 1777      do
Peter MILLER      do      do
Harmanus HOUSE      do      do
John SMYTH      do      do
Michael MORIN      do      do
John LORD      do      do
Hugh JONES      do      do
George HOUSE      do      do
John HOUSE      do      do
John DAVIS      do      do
Joseph SIRN      do 24 June 1778
Joseph PAGE      do 24 Octr. 1778
Derck BELL      do      do
Thomas YOLE      do      do
George STEWART      do      do
Emanuel HUMFRIES      do      do
Frederick WINTER      do      do
Henry WINTER      do      do
John RICHART      do      do
Nicholas PHILIPS, Senr.      do      do
John YARNS      do      do
Adam BOWMAN, Junr.      do      do
Jacob BRUNNER      do      do
Redman BERRY      do      do
Charles ANGER      do      do
Henry WINDECKER      do      do
John YOUNGS      do      do
Thomas SILK      do      do
Jacob TAKE      do      do
John SEACORD, Senr.      do      do
John SEACORD, Junr.      do      do
Solomon SEACORD 25 Decr. 1777 24 June 1778
Stephen SEACORD      do 24 Octr. 1778
David SEACORD      do      do
Silas SEACORD      do 24 June 1778
Peter SEACORD      do 24 Octr. 1778
Jacob BOWMAN      do      do
Peter SIMMON      do      do
John PHILIPS      do      do
Jacob ENGUSH      do      do
Robert FARRINGTON      do      do
Henry SMITH      do      do
Adin SEABIE      do      do
Nicholas PHILIPS, Senr.      do      do
Conrad SILL      do      do
Joshua BEABIE      do      do
Abraham WARTMAN      do      do
Augustus ANGER      do      do
Edward HICKS, Senr.      do      do
Charles DEPUE      do      do
Thomas GRIFFIS      do      do
Great Britain, British Library, Additional Manuscripts, No. 21765, folios 44-45.
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Butler’s Rangers – Caldwell’s Coy.

[Extract]

We the undermentioned Commissioned & non Commissioned Officers & Privates of Captain William CALDWELL’s Company of Rangers do acknowledge to have received from John BUTLER Esqr. Major Commandant of a Corps of Rangers the full amount of our Pay from 24th December 1777 to 24th October 1778 inclusive.

Commencing Ending
Captain William CALDWELL 25 Decr. 1777 24 Octr. 1778
1st Lieutenant Bernard FREY      do      do
2d Lieutenant Peter HARE      do      do
Serjt. Frederick DOCKSTEDER      do      do
Serjt. Daniel YOUNG      do      do
Serjt. Joseph PETRIE      do      do
Corpl. Benjamin McKAY      do      do
Corpl. Benjamin DAVIS      do      do
Corpl. James WILSON      do      do
Henry SIMMON      do      do
Adam BOWMAN, Senr.      do      do
Isaac VOLKENBURG      do      do
John HOVER      do      do
Jacob BOWMAN, Junr.      do      do
Stephen FERRINGTON      do      do
Oldrick SHATT      do      do
George KINTNER      do      do
Robert REYNOLDS      do      do
Philip BUCH      do      do
Edward HICKS      do      do
Frederick FRANK      do      do
Frederick SMITH      do      do
Jacob HUNTINGER      do      do
Benjamin HICKS      do      do
John TOPP      do      do
John CARLOCK      do 31 July 1778
James BAKER      do 24 Octr. 1778
Henry TEAL      do 24 June 1778
John CLAUS      do 24 Octr. 1778
Frederick VANDERLIP      do      do
William QUACK      do      do
John McDONNEL      do      do
John MOSS      do      do
Peter McDONNEL      do      do
Jacob SPARBECK      do      do
John STEPHENS      do      do
William BUSH      do      do
James DAWSON      do 24 April 1778
John PARKER      do 24 Octr. 1778
David BRASS 25 Decr. 1777 24 June 1778
Adam KRYSLER      do 18 May 1778
David HOLLAND      do 31  do
Thomas BROOKS      do 24 Octr. 1778
Henry BOSS      do      do
James EMPSON      do      do
Robert CAMPBELL      do      do
James BROWN      do      do
Charles SMITH 25 June 1778      do
Abner SPENCER 25 Decr. 1777 31 May 1778
Thomas McCORMICK      do 24 June 1778
William SMITH 30  do 31 May 1778
Frederick SEGAR      do 24 Octr. 1778
Richard McGINNES      do      do
James CROWDER      do      do
Isaac CROWDER      do      do
William NEWBERRY      do 24 June 1778
John SMITH 25 June 1778 24 Octr. 1778
John TURNEY, Junr.      do      do
Pay of 3 Contingent Men 25 Decr. 1777      do
 Great Britain, British Library, Additional Manuscripts, No. 21765, folios 64-65.

He was was captured along with his son, Edward Jr, who were both sentenced to death. Edward Sr was hung in 1778 in Minisink (a town located in southwest Orange County, New York) as a traitor, but his widow and sons escaped to Canada. Details of his death cannot be proved conclusively – nor that I have found to date.  I can’t find much that they “escaped” to Canada, but it stands to reason.

Edward was later officially recognized as a U.E. Loyalist, so his widow and children were compensated for their losses with extensive land grants in Marysburg, Prince Edward Co, Ontario —- thus originating an extensive Ontario Hicks line.

Possible verification of Edward Jr’s arrest is as follows: (Hist of Kuykendall Fam, by G B Kuykendall, Kilham Stan & Prnt Co, Portland, OR, 1919, p 331 & 332) Wilhelmus Kuykendall – The next pension claim found was that of Wilhelmus Kuykendall. His application was made October 9, 1832. In his “statement” he said that he “Entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated; he resided in the town of Minisink, Orange county, and state of New York, and in 1778 went into service under Lieutenant Martyn Decker; went in pursuit of Robert Land and Edward Hix, who were sent from New York to carry dispatches to the Indians at Niagara, and captured said Land and Hix and delivered them over to Lieut. Bull, belonging to Spencer’s regiment, afterwards to General Pulaski, in New Jersey state, making the time in the last mentioned service one half month.

Rebel Court Martial of Robert Land & Edward Hicks Jr.

At a General Court Martial held at Minisink the 17th and continued by adjournment till the 19th day of March 1779 by order of Brigadier General Hand.

Lieut. Colonel Lindsley, President
Major Burchardt, German Regt.     Major Lamagne, Armands Corps
Captn. Shots, Indept. Corps     Captn. Selen, Indept. Corps
Captn. Brodderick,
Col. Spencers Regt.
    Captn. Weatherby,
Spencers Regt.
Captn. Boyer, Germn. Regt.     Captn. Balsar, Germn. Regt.
Lt. Young, Col. Spencers Regt.     Lt. Orr, Col. Spencers Regt.
Ensn. Clegner, Germn. Regt.     Ensn. Irvendover, Germn. Regt.
The Members being present and duly Sworn and Adjt. Bonnel of Col. Spencers Regt. acting as Judge Advocate and Prosecuting in behalf of the United States being also Sworn the Court proceed to Business.

Prisoner: Robert LAND brought before the Court charged with being a Spy and carrying Intelligence to the Enemy, Pleads not Guilty.

Evidence: James Vanokee Esqr. being Sworn saith, that at the beginning of the present War, the Prisoner was suspected of being a Tory, and examined before the Northamton County Committee. That in consequence of his swearing Allegiance to the United States he was set at Liberty.

Arthur Vantoil being sworn saith that on Thursday evening the 11th Inst. he went to Daniel Courtwrites a Neighbour of his suspecting that a number of Tories were at his House, and to see if he could get any Intelligence of them.

That when he went to the Door, he saw the Prisoner (LAND) eating Supper, as soon as LAND saw him he seized his Musket which was by his side with a Bayonet fixed. At which he, the Deponent, left the door.

He further says that Courtwright came out of the House, and he asked him if there was any news, or any Tories in his House, that he told him there was no need, neither was there any Tories in the House.

Lt. Decker being Sworn saith that the 14th Inst. he went towards Coshithton with a party of men, after a number of Tories that were on their way from New York to Niagara.

That about three OClock P.M. he fell in with them and took LAND and HICKS, he further says that LAND told him after he was made prisoner that he was going to the Enemy at Niagara.

— Adjourned till tomorrow ten O’Clock.—-

18th March – The Court met According to Adjournment.

Captn. Tyler (formerly an Inhabitant of Coshithton) being sworn saith that at the Commencement of the present war, he heard the prisoner say that he never would take up arms against the King of Britain.

That sometimes afterwards he was carried before the Committee at Peenpack and found Guilty of being an Enemy to these States, and from thence sent to a Committee in Pennsylvania to which state he belonged, for tryall, and upon his taking the Oath of Allegiance to the United States he was set at Liberty.

That immediately after that he went to the Indians; in a short time after that Returned and went to the Enemy at New York.

Captn. Tyler further says that he was sent to the Indians in a few days after Land left them, on Business to try to make peace, with them.

That the Indians told him that Land had been there and made a great complaint concerning the usage he had received from the Committee.

Captn. Tyler farther declares that a few days ago he heard LANDs Wife say that when he was searched for Letters in 1777 that he outwitted those who searched him by having a Letter concealed in his Ink Stand that was sent from General HOWE to the Commanding Officer at Niagara.

That he then told her she was as bad as her Husband and in his Opinion she had Letters from New York concealed, she declared that as God was her Judge she had not, that her Husband had him them for fear they would be found with him as he expected every Minute to be taken prisoner.

Defence: The prisoner says in his Defence that a certain Hugh JONES, John LORD and an Indian, came to his House in the Evening in April 1777.

That Jones told him that he was going to join BUTLER and BRANDT and that he intended to get the Indians to distroy the Frontiers, upon which he went with them to try to prevent their distroying the Country, on his way he met BRANDT who told him he had no Orders to distroy the Country and murder the Inhabitants except they were in arms against him, and although he was an Indian he Intended to convince the world that he was possessed with Humanity.

After that he returned Home to Coshithton where he remained, till the 21st February following and then being informed that the Indians were coming to distroy Coshithton, he went to New York to try to put a stop to their Depredations, after being there a few days was informed that the Inhabitants would kill him if he returned.

Upon which he concluded to stay in York, and immediately entered into the Kings Yard a Carpenter where he continued working till the last day February 1779.

He then left New York to go to see his Family which was about Twenty Miles west of Coshithton, and move them to Niagara.

That Genl. CLINTON who Commands the British Troops in New York desired him to carry a Letter to the commanding Officer at Niagara, which he refused.

The Genl. then desired him to inform the Commandant at Niagara, that it was his desire that the Indians should not be permitted to continue to ravage and distroy the Frontiers.

Sentence: The Court considering the Case of the prisoner, the Evidence against him, and his Defence are unanimously of Opinion, that he is Guilty of the Charges Exhibited against him, and do therefore Sentence him to suffer Death.

[signed] Eleazr. Lindsley Pres.

*** The Court Adjourn till tomorrow ten Oclock ***

19th March – The Court met according to adjournment.

Prisoner : Edward HICKS Brought before the Court charged with being a Spy, and carrying Intelligence to the Enemy Pleads not Guilty.

Evidence: Lieut. Bennet being sworn saith that about two years ago he heard the prisoner say that he would as willingly kill a Man that fought against the British Troops as kill a Dog.

Captain Spalding being Sworn saith at the Commencement of the present War he was acquainted with the prisoner, and that he had a Mind to engage in the Service of the United States, which he thinks he would have done, had he not been persuaded to the Reverse by his Father, and some other evil minded People.

Defence: The prisoner says in his Defence, that he was formerly an Inhabitant of Susquehannah.

That in April 1777 he left his Fathers House and went to Niagara in Company with about Sixty Tories where he continued about two months, then entered into the Batteaux Service to carry Provisions from Niagara to Oswego where he continued about six weeks, & upon hearing that General Washington had Issued a Proclamation Offering pardon to all those who had joined the Indians if they would Return to their Homes, he imediately set of[f] to return home, but coming in too late to receive the Benefit of the Proclamation was taken by some of the Militia and carried to Hartford in the state of Connecticut and there kept confined till Septr. 78, from thence sent to New York as a prisoner of War and Exchanged, entered into the service of the Enemy in the Commissaries Department till the last day of February 79, when he made his Escape from New York and that on his way to Niagara he was taken by a party of Militia near Coshithton the 24th Inst.

Sentence: The Court considering the Case of the Prisoner, the Evidence for and against him, and his Defence, are unanimously of Opinion that he is Guilty of being a Spy and do Sentence him to be kept in Close Confinement during the War.

Eleazr. Lindsley Pres.

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, Reel 56, 10 February 1779 — 25 March 1779.

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From the Quinte Branch of the UEL Assn, Newsletter for Spring 1995 (Vol.6 No.4) a page of undocumented Hicks information. The contributor was “Ealaine Lawlor”. She stated that in 1779 father Edward Hicks, and his son Edward, were captured by the Westmoreland Militia, and held at the Minisink Prison. Father was hanged outside his son’s cell, so the son plotted his escape. Feigning a stomach ailment he was let outside for some fresh air, and there he overpowered his guard, and went on an adventure to escape his captors. Eventually he made it back to British lines. Settlement

American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War were consdiered to be Loyalists. At the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King’s Men. When their cause was defeated, about 15% of the Loyalists (65,000–70,000 people) fled to other parts of the British Empire, to Britain itself, or to British North America (now Canada). Northern Loyalists largely migrated to Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. They called themselves United Empire Loyalists. Most were compensated with Canadian land or British cash distributed through formal claims procedures. Edward Hicks took advantage of the UEL land grant and settled in Marysburg, Prince Edward County, Ontario.

In 1789, Lord Dorchester, governor-in-chief of British North America, proclaimed that the Loyalists and their children should be allowed to add “UE” to their names, “alluding to their great principle, the Unity of Empire.” As a result, the phrase “United Empire Loyalist,” or UEL, was applied to Loyalists who migrated to Upper and Lower Canada.

In determining who among its subjects was eligible for compensation for war losses, Britain used a fairly precise definition: Loyalists were those born or living in the American colonies at the outbreak of the Revolution who rendered substantial service to the royal cause during the war, and who left the United States by the end of the war or soon after.

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We see that Edward Hicks Jr and (the rest of the family) removed to Upper Canada – Ontario.  Edward Jr is noted in the “History of the Settlement of Upper Canada (Ontario)” by Wm. Caniff, M.D., Toronto: Dudley & Burns Printers, Victoria Hall, 1869 (pgs 104 and 105).

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From “History of the Settlement of Upper Canada (Ontario)” by Wm. Caniff, M.D., Toronto: Dudley & Burns Printers, Victoria Hall, 1869 (pgs 104 and 105)

==================================================

What We Know About Edward The Spy

Husband: Edward HICKS Jr. (My 6x Great Uncle)

Born: ABT 1761 at: Dutchess Co, New York.  Married: ABT 1793 at: North Marysburgh, Prince Edward County, Ont Died: 11 Nov 1832 at: N. Marysburgh Twp, Prince Edward Co, Ontario.  Father: Edward “The Loyalist” HICKS. Mother: Elvina (Levina).


Wife: Deborah PRINGLE

Born: 28 Aug 1772 at: Skenesborough, Whitehall, New York.  Died: at: Father: Sgt. Timothy PRINGLE, SR (Loyalist). Mother: Huldah WELDON.


CHILDREN

Name: John HICKS Born: ABT 1794 at: N. Marysburgh Twp, Prince Edward Co, Ontario.   Married: 1828 at: Mulmur Twp, Dufferin Co, Ont. Died: ABT 1870 at: Mulmar Twp, Dufferin Co, Ontario. Spouses: Hannah Elizabeth HYNAMAN.


Name: Edward HICKS Born: 1796 at: Ontario.  Married: at: Died: at: Spouses: Lucretia MILLER TAYLOR.


SOURCES  1) Descendants of Edward, “The Loyalist,” Hicks   2) Beecher Family Genealogy

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Land Claims

From “Second Report of the Bureau of Archives for the Province of Ontario”, 1904, whichScreen Shot 2018-02-10 at 11.37.10 PM printed many of the investigations made by the government into the claims of the Loyalists. Claim # 441, made at Montreal on 6th March, 1788 (this is a verbatim transcript photocopied by Dale Halliday at the UEL Library in Toronto): (This claim is made by Ed, Jr on behalf of his father Ed. SR)

*** Evidence on the Claim of EDWARD HICKS, late of Susquehana, now of Pensilvania Cataraqui, Bay of Quinty. (note: probably means “late of Susquehana, Pensilvania, now of Catarqui, Bay of Quinty”; Cataraqui was the old name for Kingston ON, the nearest town to Marysburgh. D.H.)

Claimt (son, Edward Jr.) Sworn: Says he was in Butlers Rangers in 1783 & sent a claim to England by Capt. Gummersal. He is a native of America. In 1775 he lived on the Susquehana with his Father. He joined the British Army in 1777 & served the War in Butlers Rangers. He now resides at Bay of Quinty. The Claim is for his Father’s Property. He died 1780 at New York & had served in Butler’s Rangers. There are 5 Boys & 2 Girls alive, all in Canada. His Mother is alive & married to Joseph Wright in the Bay of Quinty. He had 600 Acres on the Susquehana. He bought it of the Pensilvania & Connecticut Claimts. before the War. He had 25 acres cleared. He can not tell who has it now. Lost his Stock, Farming Utensils, Furniture.

Wits. WILLIAM FRANKS Sworn: Remembers Ed. Hicks Lands. He had a farm on the Susquehana. He had considerable Clearance & a pretty large Stock of Cattle. The rebels took greatest part.

Wits. G. KENTNER Sworn: Hicks deceased was always Loyal; on the same title as the others there. He had 20 acres cleared & had a good Stock of Cattle & Horses. Claimt. is a good soldier.

April 25 Edward Hicks produces a paper signed by 2 of his Brs., Danl. & Joseph, agreeing that he shd. receive what is due to them & also answering for the younger Brs. & Sisters.”


I’m sure the Hicks have way more interesting history to offer us … I am going to continue my research down this line for sure!

Namaste

T xo

On Genealogy: My 2x Grand-Parents – Louis Allard & Eva Beaulieu

This line continues down my maternal grand-mother side.  This is the story of my great great gramma and grampa on my grandma’s dad’s side.

This is the story of Louis Napoléon Allard and Eva Beaulieu.

Louis’ Birth

Louis Napoléon Allard was born on/about November 24, 1874, in Curran, Ontario to Marie Louise Gariepy, age 20, and Hillaire Allard, age 19.

The 1901 Census indicates that his date of birth is 7 Sep 1873. However he was baptized on 24 Nov 1874 and in that day it wasn’t uncommon to be baptized the day of your birth – so I am using that date for now, until I can find concrete evidence.  Normally one wouldn’t wait over a year to have your child baptized.  


Louis’ Baptism

Paroisse St-Luc de Curran • 24 Nov 1874 • Curran, Ontario, Canada


Construction of the Canadian Pacific Railroad

In 1881, Louis was living in Prescott, Ontario when the Canadian Pacific Railroad was under construction.  When the Canadian Pacific Railway laid its first spike in Bonfield in the early 1880’s Bonfield township prospered. Recognition of Bonfield as the place where the first spike of the CPR was driven was recognized in 2002 in the Railway Hall of Fame.


Louis’ Residence

Louis lived in Prescott, Ontario, in 1881.  In the Township of Plantagenet North


Eva’s Birth

Eva Beaulieu was born on May 6, 1882, in Taunton, Massachusetts, USA, to Georgina Prêtaboire, age 27, and Napoléon Beaulieu, age 31.

Taunton is a city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States, located approximately 64 km south of Boston, 29 kms east of Providence, RI.

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Louis’ Residence

Louis Napoléon Allard lived in Prescott, Ontario in 1891.

He was living at home with his parents and siblings. No job noted in the census or if he was in school.

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Eva’s Death of Father

Her father Napoléon Beaulieu (1851–1889) passed away on May 6, 1889, in New Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, at the age of 38.  Eva was 7 years old.


Eva’s Death of Mother

Her mother Georgina Prêtaboire (1855–1892) passed away on July 26, 1892, in New Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, at the age of 37.  Eva was 10 years old.


Eva’s Arrival to Canada

The 1921 census states that she immigrated to Canada in 1891 from the U.S.A. We know that she came back to Canada after her PARENTS died – her mother passed in 1892.  So we know that she immigrated to Canada in/about 1892 or later.

Folklore from my Mémère (her grand-daughter Desneiges Lamothe) and a handwritten letter from a relative, Yvonne M. Beaulieu, indicates that she was told that Eva went back to Canada with the Shanks after her parents died.  The letter also goes onto say that the family name was Hudon de Beaulieu, and that when they arrived at Ellis Island that they dropped the Hudon and so it became Beaulieu. She also states in the letter that she is unsure as to the relationship with the Shanks and why she returned with them.  She says that the Beaulieu’s immigrated to the USA during the time of the French Revolution (April 20, 1792 – March 25, 1802) – this is NOT fact from what I have found so far.  The facts show that the Hudon de Beaulieu’s were born in Québec, Canada – at one point they did emigrate to the U.S. but why?  What was going on in Lower Canada/USA at that time that my French 3x Parents would have moved to the USA from Québec between 1851 and 1889 (as Napoleon Beaulieu  – Eva’s dad was born in Québec according to what I have found)?

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The original of this letter was given to me by my Mémère Lamothe. It was given to her by someone on the Allard side doing the family tree back then. She passed it along to me.


Marriage

Eva Beaulieu and Louis Napoléon Allard were married in Bonfield, Ontario, on January 8, 1900, when she was 17 years old.  Louis was 25.

He was a farmer. Marriage Certificate indicates that Eva immigrated from Taunton, USA. Witnesses: SHANK, Leo of Bonfield and ALLARD, Celina also of Bonfield.

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Canada’s First Francophone Prime Minister

Eva and Louis may have benefited from the compromise-seeking administration of Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier while living in Ontario, in 1901.  As prime minister, Wilfrid Laurier fought for the autonomy of Canada and led the country through a prosperous period of growth.


Residence

They were living in Bonfield, Ontario, in 1901.

They are living with Louis’ mother, Marie Garipye Allard (Marie is noted as the head of the household) and all of his siblings per the 1901 census.  So, we assume that Louis’ dad, Hillaire Allard, has passed by this time (I cannot locate a date of death for him as of yet).


The Creation of Canada Dry Ginger Ale

Eva and Louis probably enjoyed sipping a new style of ginger ale in 1907 in Ontario. In 1907 chemist J. J. McLaughlin patented Canada Dry Ginger Ale, helping to pioneer the soda and bottled beverage industry.


Residence

They were living in Bonfield, Ontario in 1911.

Marie Garipye Allard (Louis’ mother) is living with them at this point. The census states that Eva immigrated in 1847 which we know is incorrect & there is also a note that her husband is Dorando Shenk (this isn’t accurate, but we know that she can to Canada with the Shanks).

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Louis’ Death of Mother

His mother Marie Louise passed away on November 27, 1914, in Bonfield, Ontario at the age of 60.

1854–1914


Canadian Women Win the Right to Vote

It took more than 100 years of lobbying but women finally won the right to vote in Canada in 1918 when Eva lived in Bonfield,  Ontario.  Maybe she voted in the next election?


Residence

Eva and Louis lived in Bonfield, Ontario on June 1, 1921.

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Attendance at Son, Dollard’s Wedding

Marriage Certificate for Dollard & Josephine Boissoneault indicate that Louis and Eva were witnesses.  Apr 1936 • Bonfield Ontario.

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Residence

1938 Rural Preliminary List of Electors.  Note that Louis is listed on the electors list as retired.

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Residence

Eva and Louis lived in Bonfield, Ontario in 1949.  Desneiges Lamothe (grand-daughter) said that they sold the farm during WWII and moved downtown and lived near St. Bernadette’s church (this appears to be supported by the Rural Preliminary list of Electors  below).  She and Louis had a big farm  – they had sheep, cow, horses, chickens and pigs. They used to sell wool and cotton from the sheep to send to Montréal.  They also made and sold cream made from cow utters.  They lived on the farm, off of the land.  She says that they had a big big house, it had a big kitchen with large farmers table and a fire wood stove.  She had a separate sewing room –  Eva used to make her sort through all of the odd buttons. The house had a huge dining room – had an old gramophone which she used listen to. It was a 2 story house, 3 bedrooms. The home had a parlour room. Their bedroom was on the main floor and had a sleigh bed.  They had a yarn spinner, they used to spin wool and used to make member hold her arms out to make balls of wool.  I’d like to see if I can get a photo of their house or their farm, they may have some at the town hall in Bonfield if my Mémère doesn’t.  

As per the Rural Preliminary list of Electors for the Town of Bonfield for 1949.  Note that Louis is listed as a “Gentleman”.  Generally speaking  a Gentleman, needed to do no paid work to support himself and did not rely on handouts of any sort from others he would live off his investments.

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50th Wedding Anniversary

1950not Eva Beaulieu and Louis Allard


Death of Louis

Louis passed away in 1954 in Bonfield, Ontario, at the age of 80. He had Eva had been married 54 years.  Of what did he pass from?  I wasn’t able to locate a death certificate for him


Death of Eva

Eva died in 1961 in Haileybury, Ontario, when she was 79 years old. Desneiges  told me that after Louis died, their daughter Marguerite took care of her. She was crippled with arthritis. She was placed in a South River nursing home for a year, maybe more, and then she was placed in Haileybury in a nursing home. Haileybury is a city in Northeastern Ontario.


Other Side Notes

I spoke with my Mémère further about her grand-parents.  She also commented that they were very religious.  They went to church every Sunday, and prayed a lot.  They said the rosary each night (on their knees).  She says that they went to church by horse and buggy.  She described her as a “very nice lady” and a “very loving lady”.  She added that she used to make good butter cookies.   She described her Pépère as a “quiet man”.


 Burial

They are buried together in Bonfield Ontario.

not Louis Allard and Eva Beaulieu-Gravestone-Bonfield Cemetary

I still have some additional work to do and things to look into and some more research do to.  I’d like to find some more photos and talk to my Mémère some more.

On Genealogy: My Maternal Great Grand-Parents: Palma Duchesne & Laurette Allard

  • 27721147_10215774348259699_1365457277_nI’ve been trying to determine where next to follow my ancestry line to and which line to write about.   Instead of writing about some distant relative, I thought I’d start writing with those a bit closer to me and write backward.  
    I am going to start with my great grand parents on my mom’s maternal side.
     

When Palma Henri Duchesne was born on August 31, 1908, in Bonfield, Ontario, his father, Médéric, was 25 and his mother, Leda, was 21.

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Note —-  the notice of birth has him listed as Henri Retina Duchesne


When Laurette Allard was born on April 3, 1914, in Bonfield, Ontario, her father, Louis, was 37, and her mother, Éva, was 31.

27718774_10215774168935216_404484476_n

Palma’s Baptism

Sept 6 1908 – Paroisse St. Bernadette – Bonfield, ON

not Baptism

Employment

Palma worked for Canadian Pacific Railway in 1931, likely as a Rail section worker.

A little tidbit of history about the CPR and Bonfield: When the Canada Central Railway became the Canadian Pacific Railway in the early 1880’s Bonfield township prospered. The CPR started its westward expansion from Bonfield, Ontario (previously called Callander Station) where the first spike was driven into a sunken railway tie in 1881. Bonfield, Ontario was inducted into Canadian Railway Hall of Fame in 2002 as the CPR First Spike location.

He advanced to work for Trans Canada Highway in 1932 which paid a then high income of $5.00/month.

He took on a second job working evenings as a Baker for Ovide Martin.  Completing the highway’s assignment, Ovide offered Palma a full-time position.


Marriage

Palma Henri Duchesne married Laurette Allard in Bonfield, Ontario, on May 16, 1933 at St. Bernadette’s Parish.

Palma was 25, Laurette was 19. He is noted as being a Farmer’s son. She was “at home”. Both could read and write.

  • not Marriage Certificate

    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Desneiges Adrianne was born on January 31, 1934 (my grand-mother).


    Birth of Son

    Son Lucien was born on June 15, 1935.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Rita was born on August 15, 1936.


    Birth of Son

    Son Paul was born on May 27, 1938.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Aline was born in 1939.


    Death of Daughter

    Daughter Aline passed away on August 8, 1939, when she was less than a year old.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Eva was born on August 1, 1941, in Ontario.


    Birth of Son

    Leo Omer was born on October 19, 1942.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Cécile was born on August 12, 1945.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Irène Léoni was born on August 18, 1946, in Ontario.


    Palma Opens Duchesne Groceries

    In 1946 while he working unloading his truck, a log rolled off and struck him. The incident left him unable to work in logging any longer, he had to seek other employment.  By now he had 8 children and a wife at home.  Times were hard, so Palma made the life changing decision to mortgage his house and extend it to build a variety store in 1947.

    By 1950 the variety store had become a grocery store.  Duchesne groceries was located at 115 Schayer Street in Bonfield.

    • not Palma & Laurette at Magazin Duchesne

    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Léa Alice was born on February 9, 1947.


    Residence

    1949 – As per the Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980

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    Inaugural Session of 1951 Bonfield Council

    Palma started serving on the Bonfield Town Council and did so for 25 years.

    not Inaugural Session of 1951 Bonfield Council

    Birth of Son

    His son André Patrick was born on March 18, 1953.


    Laurette’s Death of Father

    Her father Louis Napoléon passed away in 1954 in Bonfield, Ontario, at the age of 80.

    Screen Shot 2018-01-27 at 2.55.00 PM


    Employment

    In 1954 Palma bought a brand new pick up truck and converted it so that he could transport groceries and merchandise to Grand Desert (in the south west corner of the township) on a regular basis.

    Palma also began using his truck to transport school children along a regular route. He continued this until 1967, when the truck was replaced by a small bus. A large regulation sized bus was finally purchased and in use by 1967.


    Birth and Death of Daughter

    Daughter Marie was born in 1955 and passed away that same day.


    Grand-Daughter’s Baptism

    January 20 1956 – Mona Lamothe

    27662172_10215774166255149_507753039_n


    Birth of Son

    Son Jean was born in April 1958 in Ontario.


    Palma’s Death of Father

    When Palma was 52 years old, his father Médéric passed away on December 12, 1960, in Ontario at the age of 77.


    Palma’s Death of Mother

    His mother Leda passed away on October 3, 1966, at the age of 79.


    Laurette’s Death of Mother

    Her mother Éva passed away in 1961 in Haileybury, Ontario, at the age of 79.

    Screen Shot 2018-01-27 at 2.47.42 PM


    1974 – Birth of First Great Grand-Child

    27718165_10215774106293650_1083778350_n
    Photo:  Mémère & Pépère Duchesne, Baby Tina & Mona


    Employment

    Palma decides to close Duchesne Groceries.  There was no more grocery store in Bonfield.


    Death of Daughter

    Daughter Rita passed away in 1976 in Toronto, Ontario, at the age of 40.


    4 Generations – 1976 

    27591914_10215774164775112_1870203217_n
    Laurette, Desneiges, Mona & Tina


    Palma’s Death

    Palma died in April 1976 in Ontario when he was 67 years old.

    According to the A History of the Township of Bonfield Centennial Book, Palma died of lung cancer.


    In 1977, the house was sold to their son, Léo. Léo, his wife Nicole live there to this day (2018).


    Residence

    Laurette lived in Mattawa, Ontario, from 1977 to 1985.

    She had a boyfriend who lived there as well as her son, Lucien. After her boyfriend passed away, Laurette decided to move to Kitchener ON


    IMG_1651
    Tina, Mona, Mémère Duchesne and Darryl

    Residence

    1985 – After deciding to move to Kitchener, Laurette was at home in Mattawa packing when she suffered a massive stroke, leaving her paralyzed on her left side and totally blind.  She was transported to KW Hospital (now Grand River Hospital) in Kitchener and was then transferred to Freeport Hospital (a long term care facility) in Kitchener (3570 King St. East).  She resided there until her death.

    Screen Shot 2018-01-27 at 9.13.00 PM


    Laurette’s Death

    Laurette died on March 2, 1990, in Kitchener, Ontario, when she was 75 years old.  She died at Freeport Hospital.

    She is buried with her husband Palma in Bonfield ON

    Screen Shot 2018-01-27 at 3.05.57 PM


27661324_10215774171855289_907955044_n
Palma Duchesne, René & Thelma (Lamothe) Besner, Clifford Duchesne  – cannot make out the other 2 and Laurette (Allard) Duchsne

On Genealogy: Filles du roi – Descendant of Jeanne-Claude Boisandré

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Most Canadians are familiar with the King’s Daugther’s/Filles du roi.  The Filles du roi, were some 770 women who arrived in the colony of New France (Canada) between 1663 and 1673, under the financial sponsorship of King Louis XIV of France. Most were single French women, many were orphans. Their transportation to Canada and settlement in the colony were paid for by the King. Some were given a royal gift of a dowry of 50 livres for their marriage to one of the many unmarried male colonists in Canada.

Colonization of New France

I am as French Canadian was they come, and, before I get into the story of my descendant, I want to talk a bit about colonizing New France.  The first settler was brought to Quebec by Samuel de Champlain – the apothecary Louis Hébert and his family, of Paris. They came expressly to settle, stay in one place to make the New France settlement function. Waves of recruits came in response to the requests for men with specific skills, like farming, apothecaries, blacksmiths. As couples married, cash incentives to have large families were put in place, and were effective.

To strengthen the colony and make it the centre of France’s colonial empire, Louis XIV decided to send single women, aged between 15 and 30 known as the King’s Daughters/ Les Filles du Roi, to New France, paying for their passage and granting goods or money as a dowry. Approximately 800 arrived during 1663–1673. The King’s Daughters found husbands among the male settlers within a year or two, as well as a new life for themselves. They came on their own accord, many because they could not make a favourable marriage in the social hierarchy in France. By 1672, the population of New France had risen to 6,700, from 3,200 in 1663.

At the same time, marriages with the natives were encouraged, and indentured servants, Screen Shot 2017-12-19 at 1.49.45 PM.pngknown as engagés, were also sent to New France.

The women played a major role in establishing family life, civil society, and enabling rapid growth. There was a high demand for children, for they contributed to the prosperity of the farm from an early age, and there was plenty of food for them. Women bore about 30% more children than comparable women who remained in France. Landry says, “Canadians had an exceptional diet for their time. This was due to the natural abundance of meat, fish, and pure water; the good food conservation conditions during the winter; and an adequate wheat supply in most years.”

Besides household duties, some women participated in the fur trade, the major source of cash in New France. They worked at home alongside their husbands or fathers as merchants, clerks and provisioners. Some were widows who took over their husband’s roles. A handful were active entrepreneurs in their own right

I also want to take a moment to be clear – the indigenous peoples had been living on this territory for millennia. That is, well before the Vikings ventured so far East or the French “colonized” it or the English took over.  So,  I don’t believe they discovered a new territory, the native people were here long beforehand.  They just colonized it made in their own in the name of the King of France.  

Jeanne- Claude Boisandré

I actually descend from several Filles du roi and Filles a marrier – however, today I am going to focus on Jeanne-Claude Boisandré (1644-1671). a.k.a. Jeanne -Claude Duboisandré was the daughter of Sieur Jacques de Boisandré the Ormelée and Mary Vieuville.

When Jeanne Claude De Boisandré was born in about 1631 in Caen, Calvados, France, her father, Jacques, was 51, and her mother, Marie, was 46.

She married Pierre Rancourt in Saint- Jean, Caen, France.  This IS the line from which I descend … 

Screen Shot 2017-12-19 at 1.42.53 PM
After the passing of her first husband on or about July 24, 1667 in Caen, Département du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France, she became a widow Filles du roi and made passage to Canada with her two sons to help settle the new colony of La Nouvelle France.  

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Arrival of the Filles du roi
A view of women coming to Quebec in 1667, in order to be married to the French Canadian farmers. Talon and Laval are waiting for the arrival of the women (Watercolor by Eleanor Fortescue Brickdale, 1871-1945. Courtesy of Library and Archives Canada, Acc. no 1996-371-1).
LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA, ACC. NO 1996-371-1

Louis De La Chaise, was the son of Louis and Marie De la Chaise George. Although he is the husband of my 7x GGM, I have a lot of respect for him.  He chose to marry her even though she was widowed and had two children from her previous marriage. For a time he provided them with shelter, a home and being cared for. 

From the Quebec, Genealogical Dictionary of Canadian Families (Tanguay Collection), 1608-1890:Screen Shot 2017-12-19 at 12.37.16 PM

Paroisse Notre Dame church record of the marriage between De La Chaise and Boisandré

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She married Jean Létourneau, son of David Létourneau and Sébastienne Guery January 15, 1668 in Ile d’Orleans, Québec shortly after De La Chaise died.

Most of the millions of people of French Canadian descent today are descendants of one or more of these courageous women of the 17th century!

Jeanne Claude De Boisandré died on July 24, 1671, in Ste-Famille, Québec, when she was 41 years old.

Fast forward: as we all know, New France will lose the 7 years war to Britain and will fall, relaying power to the Brits, then commences the dawn of British North America and les Québequois will mark the event on their license plates “je me souviens”.

My Lineage 

Jeanne- Claude Boisandré + Pierre Rancourt (7th Great Grand Parents)

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Joseph Noel Rancourt + Marie Parent (6th Great Grand Parents)

Joseph was born in 1655 in Saint-Jean-de-Lizieux, Normandy, France and arrived in New France in 1685

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He married Marie Parent, daughter of Pierre Parent and Jeanne Badeau on February 5, 1685 in Beauport, Capitale-Nationale, Québec, Canada .

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He married Françoise Davaux , daughter of Charles Davaux and Marguerite Aubigny September 18, 1701 in La Visitation -de -Notre- Dame, Chateau- Richer, Capitale-Nationale.

He died March 21, 1719 at Notre-Dame, Québec. He was buried March 21, 1719 in Notre- Dame, Québec.|

Charles Francois Rancourt + Marie Françoise Duquet dit Durochers (5th Great Grand Parents)

Screen Shot 2017-12-27 at 8.33.59 PMScreen Shot 2017-12-27 at 8.34.59 PM.png

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Charles Alexandre Rancourt + Marie Josephe Montmigny (4th Great Grand Parents)

Charles BIRTH 15 JUL 1729 Québec, Canada

Charles DEATH 26 MAR 1774 St-Joseph De Beauce, Chaudière-Appalaches, Québec, Canada

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Louis Rancourt + Emelie Terre (Thare/Therre) (3rd Great Grand Parents)

Louis was born on November 26, 1807, in Québec City, Québec

Louis died on March 25, 1847, in Calumet, Québec, when he was 39 years old.

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Olive Rancourt + Patrick James Mullen (2nd Great Grand Parents)

PJ was born on 22 Dec 1825 in County Londonderry, Ireland, UK, his  date of birth was taken from his death certificate. 

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His lineage has been particularly difficult to find information on.  I’ve found a note that in 1851 there was a Patrick James Mullen was at the Ballycastle Poor Law Union, in Antrim, Northern Ireland.  So, he may have been in a workhouse, this is not confirmed. Each Poor Law Union in Ireland contained at least one workhouse. This was back breaking work.  Maybe he was in there during/because of the Great Irish Potato Famine from which lasted from 1845 – 1852?  Could this be why he decided to leave Ireland? We know little about his parents; whom I have listed as Michael Mullen and either Nancy McGinnis or Nancy MCannus according to the Pontiac Records.

He is said to have immigrated to Canada in 1861, per the census records.

It is family folklore that Patrick James left Ireland because he did not want to be a priest as his family wished. In Canada he became a schoolteacher (this is confirmed on the census’) and married Olive Rancourt on March 5, 1867.  He is also my dad’s namesake – whose name is Patrick James Richards.

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Angelina Mullen + Ambrose Richards (Great Grand Parents)

I understand from Chicky (Mary Rowlands) that Angelina’s mother died when she was quite young (I looked at the records, she was 8 years old) and she then lived with another family in Calumet (this may be, but, I cannot find any proof of this because by the next census, her dad was a widower and living with the Lee Family). She knew that her father came from Ireland and that it had been intended that he would become a priest and that he was a school teacher. Other than these facts we know very little about PJ Mullen.

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Benjamin Richards + Sarah Lee (Grand Parents)

Refer to my blogs on each of my grandparents – Grampa Benny’s WWII blog and The Lee Side of Me … about Gramma Sally’s side of the family from Yorkshire, England.

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Patrick Richards + Mona Lamothe (Parents)

Patrick was born on Jan 15 1954 in Témiscaming,  Québec, Canada and passed away November 18 2014 also in Témiscaming at the age of 60.

Mona was born on January 20 1956 in Bonfield, Ontario, Canada.

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MOI

Yet another interesting find and lineage in my genealogy search.  I’m really loving ALL of the interesting things I’m finding out on my genealogy journey.

Genealogy is a fascinating and compelling activity that demands the same kind of persistence and deductive reasoning as detective work. Tracing ancestors is really about solving a series of mysteries. I wonder where my search will lead me next?

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On Genealogy: John Ritter is my 9th Cousin, 2x removed!

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Rev. Obadiah Holmes definitely has some Famous kin.  I’ve covered President Lincoln & Amelia Earhart and now I’m covering my connection to comedic legend,  John Ritter, best known as Jack Tripper.

Another descendant of Rev. Holmes, is Willis Carrier,  the inventor of air conditioning (I really love this guy on hot, sticky, humid days!) – Carrier is his 8th great grandson.

My Connection to John Ritter:

Johnathan “John” Southworth Ritter 1948-2003
9th cousin 2x removed
Dorothy Fay Southworth 1915-2003
Mother of Johnathan “John” Southworth Ritter
Dr. Harry Thomas Southworth 1876-1933
Father of Dorothy Fay Southworth
Thomas Southworth
Father of Dr. Harry Thomas Southworth
Altha W. Aldrich
Mother of Thomas Southworth
Chad Aldrich
Father of Altha W. Aldrich
Stephen Aldrich
Father of Chad Aldrich
Penelope Pray
Mother of Stephen Aldrich
Sarah Brown
Mother of Penelope Pray
Mary Holmes 1628-1690
Mother of Sarah Brown
Rev. Obadiah Holmes 1610-1682
Father of Mary Holmes
Martha Holmes 1640-1711
Daughter of Rev. Obadiah Holmes
Hannah Audley 1643-1685
Daughter of Martha Holmes
Abigail Devol 1695-1719
Daughter of Hannah Audley
Job Milk II 1725-1804
Son of Abigail Devol
Sarah Milk 1749-1830
Daughter of Job Milk II
Roger Moore 1775-1860
Son of Sarah Milk
Olive Moore 1821-1871
Daughter of Roger Moore
Ambrose Richards 1885-1957
Son of George Howard Richards
Benjamin George Richards 1916-1977
Son of Ambrose Richards
Patrick James Richards 1954-2014
Son of Benjamin George Richards
Tina Rose Richards
You are the daughter of Patrick James Richards

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I find the relation to John Ritter especially interesting because of his manner of death.  He passed away of an aortic dissection – the EXACT same thing that my brother, who would also be his 9th cousin, 2x removed, almost died of!  Aortic dissections are relatively uncommon. Weakened aorta walls can be congenital – refer to my previous blog entitled “Tough Times Don’t Last, Tough People Do” – I wonder if they run in all lines of this family?

John Ritter, is probably best know for the lovably goofy closet heterosexual Jack Tripper in the television comedy series ‘‘Three’s Company,” a smash hit in the 1970’s.   Jack’s character is of the lucky man who shares an apartment with two beautiful women, Chrissy, played by Suzanne Somers, and Janet, played by Joyce DeWitt. I used to love watching Jack, Janet and Chrissy and still love watching the reruns to this day! 

Early Life

Johnathan Southworth Ritter was born in Burbank, California, on September 17, 1948. He was the son of legendary country singer/actor Tex Ritter and his wife, actress Dorothy Fay. The couple married in 1941 and had their first child, Tom Ritter, who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy.

Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 4.41.00 PM.pngJohn was destined to follow in his parents footsteps. He was enrolled at Hollywood High School where he was student body president. After graduation from high school, he attended the University of Southern California where he majored in Psychology and minored in Architecture. His first appearance on TV was in 1966 as a contestant on The Dating Game (1965) where he won a vacation to Lake Havasu, Arizona. After making his very first cameo appearance, he was induced to join an acting class taught by Nina Foch. He changed his major to Theatre Arts, graduating in 1971 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Drama. He also studied acting with Stella Adler at the Harvey Lembeck Comedy Workshop. Between 1968 and 1969, he appeared in a series of stage plays in England, Scotland, Holland and in Germany.

Filmography

His TV debut came playing a campus revolutionary on Dan August (1970) which starred Burt Reynolds and Norman Fell, who later starred with him on Three’s Company . Then he appeared as “Reverend Matthew Fordwick” on The Waltons (1971). He continued making more guest appearances on Medical Center (1969), M*A*S*H (1972), The Bob Newhart Show (1972), The Streets of San Francisco (1972), Kojak (1973), Rhoda (1974) and Mary Tyler Moore (1970).

The following year, in late 1975, ABC picked up the rights for a new series based on a British sitcom, Man About the House (1973). Ritter beat out 50 people, including a young Billy Crystal, to get a major role. The first pilot was trashed, and in order for it to be improved, Joyce DeWitt, an unknown actress, played the role of “Janet Wood”, along with Suze Lanier-Bramlett as the dumb blonde, “Chrissy Snow”. It did better than the first pilot, but the producers still needed a change and Suzanne Somers came to the show at the very last minute to play “Chrissy”. Thus the series, Three’s Company, was born. 

Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 4.38.01 PMIn 1980, when Three’s Company was sold into syndication, the show became a ratings phenomenon. At the height of Ritter’s popularity, he won a Golden Globe in 1983 for Best Performance by an Actor after being nominated twice for Best TV Actor in a Musical-Comedy Series and, one year later, he won an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actor In a Comedy Series after being nominated twice. By its eighth season, the show began to drop in the ratings and was canceled in 1984. After cancellation, he starred in its spin-off, called Three’s a Crowd (1984), also starring Mary Cadorette, but it lasted for only one season.

His first animated movie was that of a man turning into a dragon, whose job was to defeat “Ommendon” in The Flight of Dragons (1982). The following year, he came back to series television as “Detective Harry Hooperman” in the comedy/drama, Hooperman (1987) for which he was nominated for both an Emmy and a Golden Globe in 1988 for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. He also won a People’s Choice Award for this role. He continued doing more box-office films such as Skin Deep (1989), in which he played a womanizing, alcoholic writer whose life seemed to be falling apart at the seams. In the movies, Problem Child (1990), and Problem Child 2 (1991), he played the surrogate father of a rebellious little boy who wrought havoc on the family. He also worked on Noises Off... (1992) and Stay Tuned (1992) before returning to another TV sitcom called Hearts Afire (1992) that also starred Billy Bob Thornton. The show had well-written scripts but failed to reach a massive audience which led to its cancellation in 1995. While he was working on Hearts Afire, he played “Ward Nelson” on North (1994). Then, he had the opportunity to work with Billy Bob Thornton, in the movie Sling Blade (1996), in which Ritter played the gay manager of a department store. He also provided the voice of “Clifford” in Clifford the Big Red Dog (2000). He was nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award 4 times in a row, totalling seven Emmy nominations in his 35-year career. In 1999, he was also nominated for an Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series playing the role of “George Madison” on an episode of Ally McBeal (1997).

Soon afterwards, he landed his last television role in 8 Simple Rules… for Dating My Teenage Daughter (2002), based on the popular book. On this sitcom he played “Paul Hennessey”, a loving, rational dad, who laid down the ground rules for his three children and dealt with such topics as curfews, sex, drugs, getting arrested, etc. The show was a ratings winner in its first season and won a People’s Choice Award for Best New Comedy and also won for Favourite Comedy Series by the Family Awards.

Death

On September 11, 2003, Ritter fell ill while rehearsing for 8 Simple Rules. He began sweating profusely and vomiting, and complained of having chest pains. He was taken to the Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center, by coincidence the same hospital where he was born. Physicians misdiagnosed Ritter and treated him for a heart attack (this is very common as the symptoms often mimic those of a heat attack).  However, his condition worsened. Physicians later diagnosed Ritter with an aortic dissection. Ritter died during surgery to repair the dissection, six days before his 55th birthday. This is were I’m in awe.  I heard of John Ritter and Alan Thicke dying in surgery for aortic dissections and yet my brother lived during the same surgery – was he ever blessed and he had an amazing thoracic cardiac surgeon in Dr. Ash.  

A private funeral was held on September 15 in Los Angeles, after which Ritter was interred at Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills Cemetery in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles. He died on his daughter Stella’s birthday.

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He left behind four children: Jason Ritter, (born on Sunday, February 17, 1980), Carly Ritter, (born on Monday, March 1, 1982), Tyler Ritter, (born on Thursday, January 31, 1985) and Stella Ritter, (born on Friday, September 11, 1998).

Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 4.56.34 PM.pngJohn Ritter’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is next to his father’s 

I’m excited to see what connection I make next and from which line!

On Genealogy: Say What? I’m Connected To Amelia Earhart!

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My lineage just gets better and better!  To date I have discovered a relation to a King of France, a US President, one of the Filles du Roi, an explorer,  a colleague of Samuel de Champlain, a great Uncle who died in WWI in Flanders … these are just some of my finds … and NOW …. a relation to the great aviatrix Amelia Earhart!

It’s one of the greatest unsolved mysteries!  It’s been 80 years and no resolution. I have long been fascinated by the story of Amelia Earhart.  I have watched numerous documentaries about her disappearance on History, Nat Geo, CNN etc.  The story fascinated me long before I discovered our distant relation.  Amelia is my 9th cousin, 2 x removed via the Obadiah Holmes line – the same lineage that my relation to Honest Abe comes from.  So RICHARDS family, this one is also for you!

Background

Amelia was born on July 24, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas, USA, to Amelia Otis, age 28, and Edwin Stanton Earhart, age 26.

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As you may well know, Amelia Earhart was an Aviation Pioneer. Her flying career began in Los Angeles in 1921 when, at age 24, she took flying lessons from Neta Snook and bought her first airplane, a Kinner Airstar. Due to family problems, she sold her airplane in 1924 and moved back East, where she took employment as a Social Worker.

Four years later, she returned to aviation bought an Avro Avian airplane and became the first woman to make a solo-return transcontinental flight. From then on, she continued to set and break her own speed and distance records, in competitive events, as well as personal stunts promoted by her husband George Palmer Putnam.

Marriage to George Putnam

Amelia married George Palmer Putnam in Noank, Connecticut, USA, on February 7, 1931, when she was 33 years old.

A little about George:  In July 1927 he was responsible for the blockbuster publication of “We”, Charles Lindbergh‘s autobiographical account of his early life and Orteig Prize winning non-stop transatlantic solo flight from New York to Paris made in May of that year. The book proved to be one of the most successful non-fiction titles of all time selling more than 650,000 copies in less than a year and earning its author over $250,000, which is the 2017 equivalent of $3,410,056.50.

A significant event in Putnam’s personal and business life occurred in 1928, before the merger. Because of his reputation for working with Lindbergh, he was contacted by Amy Guest, a wealthy American living in London who wanted to sponsor the first-ever flight by a woman across the Atlantic Ocean.

Guest asked Putnam to find a suitable candidate and he eventually came up with the then-unknown aviatrix, Amelia Earhart.As it turned out, they shared many common interests: hiking, swimming, camping, riding, tennis and golf. When Putnam first met Earhart, he was still married to Binney. After she successfully completed her flight across the Atlantic, Putnam offered to help Earhart write a book about her flight, following the formula he had established with Charles Lindbergh in the writing of “WE”. The resulting Earhart book was 20 Hrs., 40 Min. (1928).

When they began writing, Putnam invited Earhart to live in his home because he felt like it would make the process easier. Shortly after, Binney left for South America which was followed by the divorce of George and Dorothy Putnam in 1929. Putnam had undertaken to heavily promote Earhart in a campaign that included a series of lecture tours and using pictures of her image in mass market endorsements for products including luggage, Lucky Strike cigarettes (this caused image problems for her, with McCall’s magazine retracting an offer) and other products.

In 1930, the various Putnam heirs voted to merge the family’s publishing firm with Minton, Balch & Co., which became the majority stockholders. George P. Putnam resigned from his position as secretary of G. P. Putnam’s Sons and joined New York publishers Brewer & Warren as vice president.

Putnam and Earhart made their relationship official shortly after his divorce was finalized, but they didn’t marry until 1931.

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Photo: Amelia & George, circa 1935

Accomplishments

She became a household name in 1932 when she became the first woman, and second person, to fly solo across the Atlantic, on the fifth anniversary of Charles Lindbergh’s feat, flying a Lockheed Vega from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland to Londonderry, Ireland. That year, she received the Distinguished Flying Cross from the Congress, the Cross of Knight of the Legion of Honor from the French Government, and the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society from President Hoover.

In January 1935 she became the first person to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean from Honolulu to Oakland, California. Later that year she soloed from Los Angeles to Mexico City and back to Newark, N.J.

In July 1936 she took delivery of a Lockheed 10E “Electra,” financed by Purdue University, and started planning her round-the-world flight. Her flight would not be the first to circle the globe, but it would be the longest, 29,000 miles, following an equatorial route – the longest in history.

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On March 17, 1937 she flew the first leg in her state of the art, twin-engine Lockheed 10 Electra from Oakland, California to Honolulu, Hawaii. As the flight resumed three days later, a tire blew on takeoff and she ground-looped the plane. Severely damaged, the aircraft had to be shipped back to California for repairs, and the flight was called off.

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Photo: Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan

Her Greatest Journey – Around the World Circumnavigation

Screen Shot 2017-12-08 at 10.08.24 PM.pngThe second attempt would begin on May 20 1937 heading East; Fred Noonan, a former Pan Am pilot, would be her navigator and sole companion in flight for the entire trip. Their last known refuelling stop was in Southeast Asia, when they arrived at Lae, New Guinea on July 2 1937. About 22,000 miles of the journey had been completed. The remaining 7,000 miles would all be over the Pacific Ocean. Their intended destination was Howland Island (their next refuelling stop), a tiny piece of land a few miles long, 20 feet high, and 2,556 miles away. Their last positive position report and sighting were over the Nukumanu Islands, about 800 miles into the flight. Earhart and Noonan are never seen alive again.

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The United States Coast Guard cutter Itasca was on station near Howland, assigned on short notice to communicate with her plane and guide her to the island once she arrived in the vicinity. But it soon became evident that she and Noonan had little practical knowledge of the use of radio navigation. The frequencies she was using were not well suited to direction finding (in fact, she had left behind the lower-frequency reception and transmission equipment which might have enabled Itasca to locate her), and the reception quality of her transmissions was poor. After six hours of frustrating attempts at two-way communications, contact was lost. A coordinated search by the Navy and Coast Guard was organized and no physical evidence of the flyers or their plane was ever found. Their fate has been the subject of many rumors and allegations which were never substantiated. Modern analysis indicates that after passing the Nukumanu Islands, she began to vector off course, unwittingly heading for a point about 100 miles NNW of Howland. A few hours before their estimated arrival time Noonan calculated a “sun line,” but without a successful, radio-frequency range calculation, a precise “fix” on the plane’s location could not be established.

According to the crash and sink theory, Earhart’s plane ran out of gas while she searched for Howland Island, and she crashed into the open ocean somewhere in the vicinity of the island.

Several expeditions over the past 15 years have attempted to locate the plane’s wreckage on the sea floor near Howland. High-tech sonar and deep-sea robots have failed to yield clues about the Electra’s crash site.

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Theories About Their Disappearance

There are numerous conspiracy theories about Earhart’s disappearance.

1)The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) postulates that Earhart and Noonan veered off-course from Howland Island and landed instead some 350 miles to the Southwest on Gardner Island, now called Nikumaroro, in the Republic of Kiribati. The island was uninhabited at the time.

A week after Earhart’s disappeared, Navy planes flew over the island. They noted recent signs of habitation but found no evidence of an airplane.  TIGHAR believes that Earhart—and perhaps Noonan—may have survived for days or even weeks on the island as castaways before dying there. Since 1988, several TIGHAR expeditions to the island have turned up artifacts and anecdotal evidence in support of this hypothesis.

Some of the artifacts include a piece of Plexiglas that may have come from the Electra’s window, a woman’s shoe dating back to the 1930s, improvised tools, a woman’s cosmetics jar from the 1930s and bones that appeared to be part of a human finger.

In June 2017, a TIGHAR-led expedition arrived on Nikumaroro with four forensically trained bone-sniffing border collies to search the island for any skeletal remains of Earhart or Noonan.

2) Another theory posits that Earhart and Noonan were captured and executed by the Japanese, and were captured as POWs.

3) Another theory claims that the pair served as spies for the Roosevelt administration and assumed new identities upon returning to the United States.

4) The final theory, and likely most realistic is that they ran out of fuel, having not been able to locate Howland Island and crashed into the sea.

What do you think happened?

My Lineage 

Amelia Earhart 1897-1937
9th cousin 2x removed
Amelia Otis 1869-1962
Mother of Amelia Earhart
Alfred Gideon Otis
Father of Amelia Otis
Isaac Otis
Father of Alfred Gideon Otis
Dr. Harris Otis
Father of Isaac Otis
Sarah Harris
Mother of Dr. Harris Otis
Martha Jenckes
Mother of Sarah Harris
Nathaniel Jenckes
Father of Martha Jenckes
Martha Brown
Mother of Nathaniel Jenckes
Mary Holmes 1628-1690
Mother of Martha Brown
Rev. Obadiah Holmes 1610-1682
Father of Mary Holmes
Martha Holmes 1640-1711
Daughter of Rev. Obadiah Holmes
Hannah Audley 1643-1685
Daughter of Martha Holmes
Abigail Devol 1695-1719
Daughter of Hannah Audley
Job Milk II 1725-1804
Son of Abigail Devol
Sarah Milk 1749-1830
Daughter of Job Milk II
Roger Moore 1775-1860
Son of Sarah Milk
Olive Moore 1821-1871
Daughter of Roger Moore
Ambrose Richards 1885-1957
Son of George Howard Richards
Benjamin George Richards 1916-1977
Son of Ambrose Richards
Patrick James Richards 1954-2014
Son of Benjamin George Richards
Tina Rose Richards
You are the daughter of Patrick James Richards
————————–

Such awesomeness,

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On Genealogy: My Connection to President Lincoln

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This was the MOST EXCITING ancestral find to date!  The connection, albeit distant – with the most impressive US Presidents of all time – Honest Abe is my 6th cousin 5x removed.

I posted yesterday on my connection to Obadiah Holmes – the important member of the Baptist church who was whipped for his beliefs – this amazing man was the 5th great grand-father of another revolutionary man who needs no introduction or biography, the great emancipator, Abraham Lincoln!

My Lineage

President Abraham Lincoln 1809-1865
6th cousin 5x removed
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Thomas Lincoln 1780-1851
Father of President Abraham Lincoln
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Capt. Abraham Lincoln 1744-1786
Father of Thomas Lincoln
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John Lincoln 1716-1788
Father of Capt. Abraham Lincoln
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Hannah Salter
Mother of John Lincoln
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Sarah Bowne 1669-1717
Mother of Hannah Salter
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Lydia Holmes 1637-1693
Mother of Sarah Bowne
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Rev. Obadiah Holmes 1610-1682
Father of Lydia Holmes
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Martha Holmes 1640-1711
Daughter of Rev. Obadiah Holmes
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Hannah Audley 1643-1685
Daughter of Martha Holmes
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Abigail Devol 1695-1719
Daughter of Hannah Audley
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Job Milk II 1725-1804
Son of Abigail Devol
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Sarah Milk 1749-1830
Daughter of Job Milk II
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Roger Moore 1775-1860
Son of Sarah Milk
Olive Moore 1821-1871
Daughter of Roger Moore
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Ambrose Richards 1885-1957
Son of George Howard Richards
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Benjamin George Richards 1916-1977
Son of Ambrose Richards
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Patrick James Richards 1954-2014
Son of Benjamin George Richards
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Tina Rose Richards
You are the daughter of Patrick James Richards
_______

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 Screen Shot 2017-11-28 at 9.52.36 PM.pnguntil his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through its Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, paved the way for the abolition of slavery.

In 1840, Lincoln became engaged to Mary Todd, who was from a wealthy slave-holding family in Lexington, Kentucky. They met in Springfield, Illinois, in December 1839 and were engaged the following December. A wedding set for January 1, 1841, was canceled when the two broke off their engagement.  They later met again at a party and married on November 4, 1842, in the Springfield mansion of Mary’s married sister.

The couple had four children. Robert Todd Lincoln was born in 1843 and Edward Baker Screen Shot 2017-11-28 at 9.53.40 PM.pngLincoln (Eddie) in 1846. Edward died on February 1, 1850, in Springfield, probably of tuberculosis. “Willie” Lincoln was born on December 21, 1850, and died of a fever on February 20, 1862. The Lincolns’ fourth son, Thomas “Tad” Lincoln, was born on April 4, 1853, and died of heart failure at the age of 18 on July 16, 1871. Robert was the only child to live to adulthood and have children.

On November 6, 1860, Lincoln was elected the 16th president of the United States, beating Douglas, Breckinridge, and Bell. He was the first president from the Republican Party.

On June 19, 1862, endorsed by Lincoln, Congress passed an act banning slavery on all federal territory.  Lincoln drafted the Emancipation Proclamation. In it, he stated that “as a fit and necessary military measure, on January 1, 1863, all persons held as slaves in the Confederate states will thenceforward, and forever, be free”.  The Emancipation Proclamation, issued on September 22, 1862, and put into effect on January 1, 1863.

As we know, President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth on Good Friday, April 14, 1865, while attending a play at Ford’s Theatre as the American Civil War was drawing to a close. The assassination occurred five days after the surrender of Robert E. Lee and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia.  Lincoln died at 7:22 a.m. on April 15.

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In surveys of U.S. scholars ranking presidents conducted since the 1940s, Lincoln is consistently ranked in the top three, often as number one.

Pretty INTERESTING FIND to see that I have some connection to a US President – as I’ve previously said coming from Canada this line is FULL of amazing discoveries. Only this ONE line goes back to the States, let alone all of the way back to the foundation – it’s also very exciting that in Canada I am also related to a Filles du Roi and Filles a Marrier – which is Canada’s equivalent of coming over on the Mayflower.

Tune in for the next blog to see what else I discover …


On Genealogy: Whipped for Baptist Beliefs – My Connection to Rev. Obadiah Holmes

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Ok, it’s safe to say we all know that I’m a genealogy NUT, I won’t even try to deny it.  I love learning and I love history, especially when it comes to MY OWN.  They say to know where you’re going, you’ve got to know where you’ve been.  I believe in knowing the trials, tribulations and successes my family has gone through, endured, surmounted and overcome, I can better understand a part of myself – and mainly teach this to my own children and to my family.  I believe I’m the first in my family to have undertaken such an in depth look at ALL lines of our family.  Sometimes I get so excited with where each branch goes, I don’t know where to go next after I’ve followed one to something exciting.

Yesterday I wrote about my familial connection to the Salem Witch Trials and I could have and likely should have stayed with that line as original settlers to the new colony, but something else piqued my interest in another line and off I went …

In going through my photo and story hints in my Ancestry.ca site, I came across a photo that someone had posted about a distant relative by the name of Obadiah Holmes.  Being Canadian, I’m astounded to see such American roots and the importance that some of my ancestors/colonial descendants have.  I had NO IDEA who Obediah Holmes was before starting this research and this blog.  A quick check online and up came a litany of information,  videos, articles and movies/documentaries on HIM.  In all honesty, I was going to write this blog about one of Obadiah’s famous descendants, but as I researched him and his significance to American history and the Baptist church, I felt it was worth writing about.

I’ll add the link to” The American family of Rev. Obadiah Holmes”  here for you to take a look at, but, I’ll provide a brief synopsis of his ancestry:

Arrival to the New Colony:

The decade of the 1630’s so disheartened England’s Puritans that they left their homeland in shipload after shipload to create a newer and purer England far away. These were the years of the Great Puritan Migration and Obadiah Holmes also “adventured the danger of the seas to come to New England.” Holmes and his wife probably sailed from Preston (just north of Liverpool), down the River Ribble, across the Irish Sea, and into the open Atlantic. They had an extremely stormy voyage that prevented them from entering Boston harbor until six weeks had passed. Soon after landing at Boston, most likely in the summer or early fall of 1638, they made their way up the coast and settled at Salem, Massachusetts.  Later removed to Rehoboth in Plymouth Colony.

Obadiah is said to have brought the first pendulum clock to America. This timepiece, one of the first of the kind ever constructed, is still doing duty in the cabinet of the Long Island and Historical Society, Brooklyn, having been presented to them by John Holmes Baker, Esq., a descendant.

Born Obadiah was born/baptized March 18, 1610 in Didsbury Chapel, County of Lancashire, England.  His father, Robert, was 31 and his mother, Katherine, was 26.
Died 15 October 1682 at Newport, Rhode island
Resting place Holmes Cemetery, Middletown, Rhode Island
Education It is said that he attended Oxford in England, but it is not certain if he graduated.
Occupation

The young Salem settlement encouraged Obadiah and his co-workers in the development of what may have been the first glass factory in North America. They made the common window glass.

Obadiah performed other duties befitting a good citizen; he surveyed and set boundaries for the land of another citizen.

In February, 1643; he accepted an appointment by the town in September 1644 to cut and gather firewood for the church elders.

He often served on juries during his years of residence at Salem.

He succeeded Dr. John Clarke & became the minister of the First Baptist Church in America. The church at Newport was his permanent charge for more than thirty years until his death.

Spouse Married Katherine Hyde (1608 – 1682) at the age of 21.  They were married in Manchester’s Collegiate College Church on November 20, 1630.
Children John, Jonathan, Mary, Martha, Samuel, Obadiah, Lydia, John, Hopestill
Parents Robert Hulmes / Holmes (1578 – 1649)  and Katherine Johnson (1584 – 1630)
Religious Affiliations

Obadiah soon found himself disliking the rigidity of the established church. Then came the horror (for the Puritans) known as Anabaptism. The Baptist zeal in Rhode Island was immeasurably heightened by a direct infusion of English Baptists from abroad. They were convinced that immersion or “dipping” was the only proper form of baptism. This innovation brought conflict and irritation to the Puritans, but brought peace and serenity, at last, to Obadiah Holmes.

He was Baptized with the “new baptism” along with 8 others and became out and out Baptists, with Obadiah becoming their leader and pastor. Obadiah took the irrevocable step toward separation from New England’s official way. It took three years for the membership of the Rehoboth church to become divided on doctrinal and legal lines and become aligned behind the minister and Obadiah as the respective leaders. Obadiah’s conversion to the distinctive views of the Baptists was developed here. He became the leader of the Schismatists (he formal separation of a church into two churches or the secession of a group owing to doctrinal and other differences).

Rev. Obadiah Holmes was a Baptist minister at a time when Baptists were barred from worshipping in the colony of Massachusetts.

A grand jury — included William Bradford, John Alden and Miles Standish — indicted Obadiah Holmes for heresy. He and his family left Plymouth for Newport, R.I., in 1650.

Fateful Trip to Lynn, Massachusetts

On July 16, 1651, Dr. John Clarke (pastor of the Baptist church in Newport, Rhode Island), John Crandall and Obadiah Holmes walked 80 miles from Newport, RI to Massachusetts.  The purpose of the visit was to bring spiritual comfort and communion to William Witter, a blind and aged Baptist who had invited the three to come to his house. The broader purpose was, of course, an evangelical one: to tell of the new baptism and its importance. The word was proclaimed, converts were baptized, the elements of the Lord’s Supper were served all of this done privately in William Witter’s home.  I

On Sunday, July 20, they were holding church services to a small congregation. While Dr. Clarke was reading passages of scripture, two constables, with a warrant for the 3 visitors, broke in on the scene. The offence charged against them was conducting religious services in non-conformity with the statutes. The 3 Rhode Islanders were placed under arrest and taken to the local Anchor Tavern, to be fed and to await their scheduled appearance before the General Court, early the next morning. 

In the morning, after a brief appearance before Robert Bridges in Lynn, Mass, the evangelists were sent to Boston for trial. The authorities denied the defendants the opportunity to offer a defence, they simply read the charges and imposed the fines. The court order for commitment to prison, indicated essentially four complaints against the “strangers”. They had offended by (a) conducting a private worship service at the same time as the town’s public worship; (b) “offensively disturbing” the public meeting in Lynn; (c) more seriously, “seducing and drawing aside others after their erroneous judgment and practices”; and (d) “neglecting or refusing to give in sufficient security for their appearance” at the next meeting of the county court.  

The same charges were levied against all three men, all of whom fell under the proscription of the 1645 law against Anabaptists. Clarke, was fined £20; Crandall, as a tag-along and largely silent companion, was fined only £5. Obadiah Holmes, already under the cloud of excommunication from the church in Rehoboth, received the largest fine of £30. Should they not wish to pay the set fines, they had an alternative: the culprit was to be “well whipped”. 

Holmes refused to accept the offer of friends to pay his fine, believing it would be an admission of guilt, making it a matter of his conscience and scruples. He remained in prison from July till September.  

The Whipping

On September 5, 1651, Obadiah was taken from the jail, outside to the market place, where Magistrate Increase Nowell told the “executioner” to strip Obadiah naked down to the waist after he refused to disrobe himself, saying “that for all Boston I would not give my bodie into their hands to be bruised upon another account, yet upon this I would not give the hundredth part of a Wampon Peaque to free it out of their hands, and that I made as much conscience of unbuttoning one button, as I did of paying the £30 in reference thereunto.” He was then tied to the post and publicly flogged at Devonshire & State Streets in Boston, just because he was a Baptist.  

There were thirty strokes (which was 10 lashings short of a death sentence), with a three-cord whip, Screen Shot 2017-11-26 at 4.21.20 PMheld by the executioner – one lash for each pound he owed. Holmes proclaimed, “I bless God I am counted worthy to suffer for the name of Jesus.” Though he received 30 lashes, to his bare back, Obadiah is said to not have let out a groan or scream – after the whipping he uttered the words “You have struck me as with roses.”  

After the flogging and out from the crowd came forward to offer their sympathy and shake Obadiah’s hand.  John Spur and John Hazel were promptly arrested and jailed.  Obadiah’s testimony deeply affected Harvard’s President, Henry Dunster.  For weeks and weeks after the flogging had to sleep on knees and elbows. 

Life After Religious Persecution

Obadiah returned to Newport and in 1652 succeeded Dr. John Clarke. He became the minister of the First Baptist Church in America. The church at Newport was his permanent charge for more than thirty years until his death. In 1656 he was made a Freeman (in U.S. colonial times, a person not under legal restraint). He served as a Commissioner from 1656-58.

Obadiah died October 15, 1682 in Newport and was buried in his own field, where a tomb was erected to his memory (in what is now the town of Middletown). His wife did not long survive him.  He had nine children and 42 grandchildren when he died.

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Thank God for men who put principles and compassion for fellow believers above their personal safety.

Last Will & Testament

These are to signify that I, Obadiah Holmes of Newport on Rhode Island, being at present through the goodness and mercy of my God of sound memory; and, being by daily intimations put in mind of the frailty and uncertainty of this present life, do therefore – for settling my estate in this world which it has pleased the Lord to bestow upon me – make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament in manner following, committing my spirit unto the Lord that gave it to me and my body to the earth from whence it was taken, in hope and expectation that it shall thence be raised at the resurrection of the just.Imprimis, I will that all my just debts which I owe unto any person be paid by my Executor, hereafter named, in convenient time after my decease.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Mary Brown, five pounds in money or equivalent to money.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Martha Odlin, ten pounds in the like pay.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Lydia Bowne, ten pounds.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my two grandchildren, the children of my daughter, Hopestill Taylor, five pounds each; and if either of them decease, the survivor to have ten pounds.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my son, John Holmes, ten pounds.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my son, Obadiah Holmes, ten pounds.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my grandchildren, the children of my son Samuel Holmes, ten pounds to be paid unto them in equal portions.
All these portions by me bequeathed, my will is, shall be paid by my Executor in money or equivalent to money.
Item. I give and bequeath unto all my grandchildren now living ten pounds; and ten shillings in the like pay to be laid out to each of them – a bible.
Item. I give and bequeath unto my grandchild, Martha Brown, ten pounds in the like pay.
All [of] which aforesaid legacies are to be paid by my Executor, hereafter named in manner here expressed: that is to say, the first payment to [be] paid within one year after the decease of my wife, Catherine {sic} Holmes, and twenty pounds a year until all the legacies be paid, and each to be paid according to the degree of age.
My will is and I do hereby appoint my son Jonathan Holmes my sole Executor, unto whom I have sold my land, housing, and stock for the performance of the same legacies above. And my will is that my Executor shall pay unto his mother, Catherine Holmes, if she survives and lives, the sum of twenty pounds in money or money pay for her to dispose of as she shall see cause.
Lastly, I do desire my loving friends, Mr. James Barker, Sr., Mr. Joseph Clarke, and Mr. Philip Smith, all of Newport, to be my overseers to see this my will truly performed. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this ninth day of April, 1681.
Obadiah Hullme [Holmes][Seal]
Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of
Edward Thurston
Weston Clarke
(Edward Thurston, Sr., and Weston Clark appeared before the Council [of Newport], December 4, 1682, and did upon their engagements [pledges] declare and own that they saw Obadiah Holmes, deceased, sign seal and deliver the above written will as his act and deed; and, at the time of his sealing hereof, he was in his perfect memory, according to the best of our understandings. Taken before the Council, as attested. Weston Clarke, Town Clerk.)

My Lineage 

Rev. Obadiah Holmes 1610-1682
10th great-grandfather
Martha Holmes 1640-1711
Daughter of Rev. Obadiah Holmes
Hannah Audley 1643-1685
Daughter of Martha Holmes
Abigail Devol 1695-1719
Daughter of Hannah Audley
Job Milk II 1725-1804
Son of Abigail Devol
Sarah Milk 1749-1830
Daughter of Job Milk II
Roger Moore 1775-1860
Son of Sarah Milk
Olive Moore 1821-1871
Daughter of Roger Moore
Ambrose Richards 1885-1957
Son of George Howard Richards
Benjamin George Richards 1916-1977
Son of Ambrose Richards
Patrick James Richards 1954-2014
Son of Benjamin George Richards
Tina Rose Richards
You are the daughter of Patrick James Richards

Conclusion

This was an interesting person to research, I had no idea that I was connected to such a significant man/family.  It’s warming to see how revered he is in the Baptist community.

Stay tuned for the original reason I was going to write about Obadiah – his most famous descendant …. any guesses on who it is?


 

On Genealogy: My Salem Witch Trial Connection

Late last night, I couldn’t sleep, I decided to do a bit of digging on some hew “hints” on my Ancestry.ca site and take closer look into my DNA profile.

A while back I posted a blog called “On Genealogy: My Quaker Connection; Descendant of John Milk, British Colonial America, 1662” which traced my roots back to colonial America.  I had an inclination based on that research that were was going to be a lot of interesting genealogical & historical facts and significance coming out of this line – and there it was – I found my first nugget.  A connection to the Salem witch trials.

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The Salem witch trials were a series of hearings and prosecutions of people accused of witchcraft in colonial Massachusetts (The Massachusetts Bay Colony) between February 1692 and May 1693. They say that between 150 and 200 people were accused of practicing witchcraft—the Devil’s magic. As a wave of hysteria spread throughout the Puritan colony, a special court convened to hear the cases.  Assembled on the bench were “people of the best prudence and figure that could be pitched upon.” Examinations took place in Salem Village (present-day Danvers, Massachusetts). The trials resulted in the executions of twenty people, fourteen of them women, and all but one by hanging. Five others (including two infant children) died in prison.

Most of the convictions and executions were grounded on testimony of spectral evidence. Spectral evidence is evidence based on visions and dreams of the actions of a witch’s spirit or specter, i.e. the testimony about what an accused person’s spirit did, rather than actions of the accused person in the body.  Opposition by the contemporary clergy to the use of spectral evidence didn’t mean the clergy did not believe that specters were real.  They believed, rather, that the devil could use specters to possess and get them to act against their own will. That Satan possessed a person was not evidence that the person had consented.  Crazy to think of in this day and age, isn’t it??

In terms of my relation – in late January/early February of 1693, the Court sat in Charlestown, Middlesex County, and held grand juries and tried five people: Sarah Cole (of Lynn), Lydia Dustin & Sarah Dustin, Mary Taylor and Mary Toothaker.

List of the Afflicted

Name Location
Alice Booth Unknown
Elizabeth Booth Salem Village
Sarah Bridges Andover
William Brage Salem Town
Mary Brown Reading
Sarah Churchill Salem Village
Johanna Dod Marblehead
John Doritch Unknown
Mary Fitch Gloucester
Rose Foster Andover
Goodhall Probably Salem Village
Benjamin Goodwin Boston
John Goodwin, Jr. Boston
Martha Goodwin Boston
Mercy Goodwin Boston
Mary Herrick Wenham
Mary Hill Salem Town
Elizabeth Hubbard Salem Village
John Indian Salem Village
Elizabeth Knapp Groton
Mary Lacey, Jr. Andover
Mercy Lewis Salem Village
Mary Marshall Reading
Abigail Martin Andover
Elizabeth Parris Salem Village
Hanna Perley Topsfield
Sarah Phelps Andover
Bethshaa Pope Probably Salem Village
Ann Putnam, Jr. Salem Village
Ann Putnam, Sr. Salem Village
Margaret Rule Boston
Susannah Sheldon Salem Village
Mercy Short Boston
Martha Sprague Boxford
Tituba Salem Village
Rebecca Towne Topsfield
Peter Tuft’s maidservant Charlestown
Sarah Vibber Wenham
Mary Walcott Salem Village
Mary Warren Salem Village
**Elizabeth Weston Reading**
Rebecca Wilkins Salem Village
Abigail Williams Salem Village

My Lineage

John Weston II 1631-1729
10th great-grandfather
Sarah Weston 1656-1684
Daughter of John Weston II
John Milk II 1668-1720
Son of Sarah Weston
Job Milk I 1694-1778
Son of John Milk II
Job Milk II 1725-1804
Son of Job Milk I
Sarah Milk 1749-1830
Daughter of Job Milk II
Roger Moore 1775-1860
Son of Sarah Milk
Olive Moore 1821-1871
Daughter of Roger Moore
Ambrose Richards 1885-1957
Son of George Howard Richards
Benjamin George Richards 1916-1977
Son of Ambrose Richards
Patrick James Richards 1954-2014
Son of Benjamin George Richards
Tina Rose Richards
You are the daughter of Patrick James Richards

The Afflicted: Elizabeth Weston

From the linage tree above, you probably noticed that my ancestral connection lies with Elizabeth Weston, daughter of John Weston of Reading.  She accused Sarah Dustin of tormenting her and was held for trial.

Her father, John Westing was born 

Place of Burial: His gravestone in the graveyard shows that he was one of the founders of the church (the First Church of Salem, MA).
Immediate Family: Son of John Weston, II and Martha Weston
Husband of Sarah Weston
Father of John Weston; Sarah Milk; Mary Weston; John Weston; Samuel Weston and 16 others
Brother of Henry Weston, I; Thomas Westonand Francis Weston
Occupation: Owned Sailing Vessels, 1644 emigration (Stow Away), Fought in King Phiilips’ War

I will write separately on John Weston in another blog as HE is the IMMIGRANT ancestor of this line and researching this has lead me to discover other interesting facts about Mr. Weston.

Screen Shot 2017-11-25 at 1.46.55 PMAccused of Witchcraft:  Sarah Dustin

Lydia Dustin/Dastin (approx 1626 – March 10, 1693), was a resident of Reading, Massachusetts, she was arrested on April 30.  She was examined on May 2 by magistrates Jonathan Corwin and John Hathorne, on the same day as Sarah Morey, Susannah Martin, and Dorcas Hoar were examined. She was then sent to Boston’s jail.

Lydia’s daughter Sarah Dustin was the next in the family accused and arrested, followed by Lydia’s granddaughter, Elizabeth Colson. Lydia’s daughter Mary Colson (Elizabeth Colson’s mother), was also accused; she was examined but not indicted.

Sarah Dustin was the unmarried daughter of Lydia Dustin. Her father was Joshia Dustin, who had been one of the founders and leading land owners of Reading, Massachusetts. She was arrested for witchcraft and for tormenting and afflicting Elizabeth Weston, the daughter of John Weston of Reading.

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Excepts from the book The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege.  By Marilynne K. Roach

Judgement

Both Lydia and Sarah were found NOT GUILTY by the Superior Court of Judicature, Court of Assize and General Gaol Delivery in January or February, 1693, after the initial trials had been suspended when criticized for their use of spectral evidence. However, they could not be released until they paid jail fees. Lydia Dustin died still in jail on March 10, 1693.  Because of this she is included on lists of those who died as part of the Salem witchcraft accusations and trials.  Sarah, must have found a way to pay and was released. Nothing more is known of her.

Ruling in the Case of Sarah Dustin:
 

      Sarah Dastin of Reding in the County of Midlesex being Indicted by the Jurors for our Soveraigne Lord & Lady the King and Queen upon their Oathes by one Indictment That is to say. For that the said Sarah Dastin of Reding in the County of Midlesex single woman on or about the month of May in the year 1692 And divers other dayes and times as well before as after certain detestable arts called Witchcraft and Sorceries wickedly mallitiously & feloneously hath used practised and Exercised at and in the Towne of Reding in the County of Midlesex aforesaid upon and against one Elizabeth Weston of Reding daughter of John Weston of Reding by which wicked Arts the said Elizabeth Weston the day and year afores’d and divers other dayes and times as well before as after was afflicted tortured tormented pined and wasted against the peace of our Soveraigne Lord & Lady the King & Queen their Crowne and dignity and the Lawes in that case made and provided. Upon the aforesaid Indictment the said Sarah Dastin was then and there before the Justices of our Lord and Lady the King and Queen aforesaid Araigned & upon her Arraignement she did then and there the day and year aforesaid plead to the said Indictment Not Guilty and put her selfe upon Tryall by God and the Country.

     Jury Sworn

     Mr Samuel Hunting, Samuel Whitmore,  Nathaniel Bassam, Stephen Willis, Henry Green, James Lowden, Nathaniel Cooledge, Thomas Welch Jun’r, Daniel Dean, Samuel Jenison,  Joseph Willson, Josiah Convers

     A Jury being called Samuel Hunting foreman and accordingly sworne no exception being made by the Prisoner The Indictment being read together with the evidences And the prisoners defence being heard The Jury went out to agree upon their verdict Who returning did then and there in open Court deliver their verdict That the said Sarah Dastin was Not Guilty of the felony by witchcraft for which shee stood Indicted in and by the said Indictment.

     The Court Ordered the said Sarah Dastin to be discharged paying her fees.

     Anno RR’s et Reginae Gulielmi et Mariae Quinto At a Superiour Court of Judicature Court of Assize & General Goal Delivery held at Boston for the County of Suffolk on the 16930425 25’th day of Aprill 1693

     Present:  William Stoughton Esq’r Chief Justice, Thomas Danforth Esq’r, John Richards Esq’ & Samuel Sewell Eq’r

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 “He wondered at the atrocities human kind was capable of committing. The majority of those housed below were ill, mentally or physically, not witches. Most were poor victims–the outcasts of society; or the opposite, people so blessed, others coveted their lives.” Brynn Chapman, Where Bluebirds Fly

I find it an interesting familial connection to this dark piece of American history.  The Salem witch trials remain a profoundly important chapter in American history.  Over 300 years after the final hanging took place, I plan on driving down to Boston & Salem this coming Summer to see, in person, the remnants of Salem’s dark summer of 1692.  Of course, I will blog of my adventures & research there – stay tuned …


On Genealogy:  Great Scott! Descendants of Andrew McKenzie & Agnes Leckie of Lanark Co, Ont.

scottish-drives-02

Today’s blog #7 on genealogy features my SCOTTISH roots.  Before my AncestryDNA results, I hadn’t spent too much time on this line – it follows my father’s line – through my 3x grand father George Richards’ wife, Cecelia —>  see tree below. I’m unable to go back any further – the records stop at Andrew and Elizabeth.

I will document what I know as of now and I continue to research and reach out to genealogical societies as are more records become available, I will update.

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I assumed we had some Scottish in us given my GGG Gramma’s last name was McKenzie.  I hadn’t spent all that much time on this line yet.  Not because I didn’t think it wouldn’t be interesting, just that I have my hands in so many different lines at the moment that sometimes I bounce around and forget to go back to a line I started.


Generation 1 

ANDREW MCKENZIE married ELIZABETH SCOUGAL

At this stage I can’t confirm who the immigrant family was.  Was it Andrew and Elizabeth who brought over Andrew or did Andrew Jr leave his family behind in Scotland for Canada?  I can confirm father’s name – mother’s name is confirmed as Elizabeth (last name in documents in McKenzie) – saw somewhere that someone located the last name of Scougal – I am going to use it for my searches now.  If it changes, I’ll update.

Scougal is an unusual name and is of early medieval Scottish origin, and is a locational surname derived from the place called Scoughall in the old parish of Tyninghame, on the coast near North Berwick.

Not a lot is known, I have a lot of investigating to do.


Generation 2

ANDREW MCKENZIE II was born about 1810-1811 in Scotland. We know this because his Marriage Certificate to his second wife states that he was 66 yrs old on Jan 8/1877. The 1891 census has him at 71 y/o, with a year of birth of 1810.  At this point it’s negligible, it could a matter of a difference between the month the census was taken and the month he was married. We do not have a location as to where he was born in Scotland, yet.

We know he immigrated to Canada before 1836 since he was married in Canada, that year. We know that he was one of the original settlers in Lancaster County Ontario based on his obit in the Perth Courier.

He married (1) AGNES LECKIE on 21 Oct 1836 in Ramsay Township, Ontario. He was 26 years old and Agnes was 23.  She was born in/about 1813, in Scotland. She died on 27 Feb 1875 in Pembroke, Renfrew, Ontario, Canada.-  I am unable to confirm this – it was just a “hint” I had on my Ancestry.ca site.

Andrew and Agnes had the following children (I will add children and DOBs once I confirm them):

  • Robert
  • Andrew
  • William
  • Alexander
  • Agnes
  • Georgina
  • Cecelia
  • Mary-Anne

We know from his obituary that Andrew was a Colporteur for 20 years visiting shanties in the Ohio Valley. Which years did he do this? Unsure –  I’m leaving it wide open starting in 1836 since it’s his marriage date and I’m stopping at 1871 as in that census he is noted as being a retired farmer.

The first time I’m able to pick up Agnes and the kids is the 1861 census.  They’re living in Renfrew County, Ontario,  Canada.  Agnes is noted as being married, however she is the Head of the household. Andrew is not identified. A man by the name of Alexander McKenzie is named on the census w/ them (he is 51) – is this a typo? Was he colporting at the time of this census? Who is Alexander McKenzie if it’s not a typo?  I know from the Library and Archives through the gov’t of Canada that the 1861 census started on January 14, 1861 for Canada East and for Canada West.  It is known that as a Colporteur he would visit shanties in the cold of winter based on his obit from the Almonte Gazettte.

Note: the Andrew listed in this census is only 16 (he’s their son, and note that he’s already working as a Labourer at that age).

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I locate them both again in the next 10 year census.  They are noted as being Presbyterian. He is now documented as being a Farmer. Andrew is 60 and Agnes is 57. Living with them are ___ 22, Agnes 20, Cecelia 19, Mary Anne 17 and Mary 4 (1 of the children’s daughter?). They are household 206 in the census.  They’re living in the same region, Admaston Township, which is still in Renfrew County.

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After Agnes passed on Feb 27, 1875, he then married (2) JANET GREVILLE TOSHACK on 08 Jan 1877 in Almonte, Ontario, daughter of William and Margaret. She was born about 1821. She died on 15 Nov 1893 in Ottawa, Ontario.  Andrew was 66 and Janet was 50 y/o. Janet was from Ramsay, Ont.  Witnesses were Alexander Gray Almonte and James Snedder Ramsay. I queried if the witnesses were kin of Almonte/Ramsay who founded the towns? However, I know just think that they’re documenting where each were from.  But, I’m not ruling out that their ancestors founded Almonte and Ramsay just yet.

By the 1881 census, he and Janet were still living Almonte, he is noted as being a retired Farmer. Living with  He is 71 and Janet was 57.

Later that same year, on October 16, 1881, Andrew passed away at the age of 72.  His death registration states that he died of Lung Congestion (likely pneumonia) and suffered with it for at least 10 weeks. His death reported by R. McKenzie assuming his son, Robert (who was a Farmer). Robert reported that his father was a “Bookseller” i.e. Colporteur

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——————–
Almonte Gazette, Friday, October 28, 1881: 

OBITUARY: Another old settler has gone to his last rest. Mr. Andrew McKenzie died of congestion of the lungs at his residence in Almonte on the 17th Oct., 1881, aged 72 years. Mr. McKenzie was for over twenty years a *colporteur in the service of the Ottawa Valley Branch Bible Society. In the winter time he visited the shanties in the Ottawa Valley, selling bibles to the shantymen, and speaking to them of Him who came to seek and save the lost. Dreary and long were the journeys he often took, and many were the hardships he endured, and the dangers he escaped as he passed from shanty to shanty. But his work is done, and we doubt not but he has received his Master’s approval, “Well done, good and faithful servant.” “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from henceforth; yea, saith the Lord, that they may rest from their labors; and their works do follow them.” 

* A colporteur is a peddler of devotional literature.

From The Renfrew Mercury, Friday, October 21, 1881:  DEAD – The corpse of Mr. A. Mackenzie, the colporteur, a former resident of Renfrew, was taken through the village on Tuesday, from Almonte, for interment in Admaston.

Andrew is mentioned in the blog Up and Down the Shantymen Used to Roam, posted on February 6, 2017 by lindaseccaspina.

Note for Andrew McKenzie:  Admaston Cemetery records show Georgina McKenzie Brown, wife of John Brown, born June 11, 1850, died March 4, 1939. It is probable that Georgina is the daughter of Andrew and Agnes since Andrew’s will mentions Georgina Brown, wife of John Brown. The will of Andrew’s second wife, Janet, refers to “Mrs. John Brown”. Georgina’s relationship to Andrew has to be verified but she is included with his children based on the circumstantial evidence in the estate files.


Generation 3

CECILIA MCKENZIE was born on 09 Dec 1851 in Ontario. She died on 12 Sep 1921 in Mattawa, Ontario. She married GEORGE RICHARDS in 1886 in Mattawa, Ontario, son of Ambrose Abraham Richards and Olive Moore. He was born on 26 Jul 1858 in Eardley Township, Ottawa County, Quebec. He died on 25 Apr 1942. Screen Shot 2017-06-25 at 11.15.40 PM

1881 Census:  George Richards, married, 23, born: in Ontario, Scottish, Farmer, Presbyterian. Rosy Richards, married, 19, Irish, born in Ontario, Presbyterian.

The next entry on this census is the family of Donald and Agnes Fraser. We find Cecelia McKenzie living there, with her sister Agnes, at the time. She and George likely knew one another and married after the death of his first wife, Rosy.  Cecelia was employed as a Seamstress.

Their son, Ambrose Richards was born in 1885 (according to his death certificate), however Cecelia and George were married in 1888.  Some 3 years later, was he born out of wedlock?


Generation 4

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Ambrose driving the grinder & Cecelia McKenzie – Richards Farm abt 1914

AMBROSE RICHARDS (B: Dec 12 1887 – Mattawa Ontario, D: 1957 – Mattawa Ontario) m. BRIDGET ANGELINA MULLEN (B: Jan 3 1887 – Vinton, Québec, D: April 10 1976 – Témiscaming, Québec) on 20 Nov 1912 in Sacre Coeur Parish, Sturgeon Falls, Nipissing, Ontario.

Of interest, Ambrose converted to Roman Catholic from Presbyterianism – apparently to marry Lina as he was baptized only 10 days before they were married.  

His Godparents were Denis Leaghy & Mary Brown.  He was baptized Catholic on 10 Nov 1912 in Sturgeon Falls, Ontario, Canada.  


Screen Shot 2017-06-25 at 11.32.53 PM.pngGeneration 5

BENJAMIN GEORGE RICHARDS (B: Feb 10 1916 – Sturgeon Falls Ontario, D: June 17 1977 –Montréal, Québec) m. SARAH ANN LEE (B: Dec 7 1922 – Meltham Mills, Yorkshire England, D: March 1993 – Montréal, Quebec)

Refer to my blogs on the LEE family and Pte. Benjamin Richards for details about my grandparents.


Generation 6

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PATRICK JAMES RICHARDS (B: Jan 15 1954 – Témiscaming Québec, D: Nov 18 2014 – Témiscaming, Québec) m.  MONA ROSE LAMOTHE (B: Jan 20 1956 – Bonfield Ontario, D: —-)


Generation 7

MOI – TINA RICHARDS

UPDATE: As of today, February 14, 2021 – I have emailed the Lanmark County Genealogical Society to see if they are able to locate any further information on Andrew, Agnes and/or Janet.

Stay Tuned ….

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On Genealogy: My Genetic Ancestry DNA Results Are In!

maxresdefaultI know I already posted a blog today.  But, as I was walking out the door, I got an email from Ancestry that my DNA results were in and I had to check them stat!

If you’ve been a regular visitor to my blog, you’ll likely know that I’ve been working hard on my family tree and tracing my roots.  I’ve come across some interesting finds along the way, some of which I have posted, others whose blogs I continue to work on and others which I continue to dig into the past to verify facts.

About DNA Testing:

genealogical DNA test is a DNA-based test which looks at specific locations of a person’s genome in order to determine ancestral ethnicity and genealogical relationships.  AncestryDNA utilizes some of the latest autosomal testing technology to revolutionize the way you discover your family history. This service utilizes advanced DNA science to predict your genetic ethnicity and help you find new family connections. It maps ethnicity going back multiple generations and provides insight

I chose to use AncestryDNA since I already use their services for my family tree.  The AncestryDNA test analyzes your entire genome—all 23 pairs of chromosomes—as opposed to only looking at the Y-chromosome or mitochondrial DNA (which makes other types of tests gender specific). Your autosomal chromosomes carry genetic information from both your parents that’s passed down through the generations.

Genealogical DNA tests do not give information about medical conditions or diseases.

The Process:

Taking a genealogical DNA test requires the submission of a DNA sample. The process of DNA testing is fairly simple and relatively inexpensive, I paid $129.00.  The DNA kit was sent to me via Ancestry, at which time I did a spit test (accumulated my saliva into a tube, to the fill line).  Once that was completed, I put everything back into the self-addressed stamped box and mailed it to Ireland for processing.

On May 10 2017, they acknowledged receiving my sample, and that they were sent to the processing lab on June 13 2017.

Today, I was finally notified that my results are in … I have been waiting a little over two months for this!   I haven’t looked at the results on my Ancestry.ca account yet.  I have a pretty good idea of what to expect because of all of the work I’ve been doing on my family tree lately, but, I’m going to take a gander here and see how close I am when I read the results.

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My Presumptions:

British and French: I know that we have roots dating back the to the 1500/1600’s coming from France and Britain, so I am expecting to see some of those genes appear in the results.

I also know that we have some Scot, Irish and perhaps Nordic blood.  The Norman DNA may show up as Scandinavian of some sort.  I am assuming this because the line I am tracing at the moment indicates that there was some land purchases made by one of my ancestors from William the Conquerors half brother, and Nord, British mixing was common at the time.

I also know that we are Native American because I have posted on that already.

The percentages and other lines however, that I am unsure – so I am very curious about this.

The Results:

Ok, let’s see how close I was.  And, the results are …. Drum Roll PLEASE …..

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My ethnicity estimate shows where my ancestors came from hundreds to thousands of years ago.  Ancestry.ca calculates it by comparing my DNA to the DNA of a reference panel of people with deep roots to specific places around the world.

 

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Genetic Communities show where my family probably lived in the past few hundred years. Ancestry created these by identifying groups of AncestryDNA members who are genetically connected to each other.

Overall Thoughts: 

On ethnicity estimate:  Very surprised that it did not pick up an First Nations, since I have lineage to prove it and I have my Algonquin status 🤷🏻‍♀️

Also, surprised that I am as much Irish and Scandinavian as I am, but at least that tells me I’m on the right path as I’m doing my research.  I did see reference of a few of my family members immigrating from Ireland including my great grandfather – so maybe there are a few more?

I’ve found no traces of Italian, Greek, Spanish or Portuguese in my tree as of yet.  I’m shocked by the only 9% French, as I have been able to trace my tree to Quebec and then back to France.

On genetic communities:  It was bang on!  The French settlement in Beauce and Montmorency are accurate with the ‘very likely’ as is the English in Yorkshire – that’s where my Gramma Sally was born before moving to Canada as a WWII War Bride in 1946.  My whole on the LEE side is from Yorkshire.

Well this was an interesting little genome experience that I am sure will help on the further discovery of my roots.

Namaste

T xo

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Genealogy: My Quaker Connection; Descendant of John Milk, British Colonial America, 1662

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On Genealogy: My Quaker Connection; Descendant of John Milk, British Colonial America, 1662.

Today’s blog on genealogy #5 is on the lineage of the Milk family.  This surname has long been associated with the county of Norfolk, England, where it appears about twenty-two times in proportion to each 10,000 of the population of that county.  There, throughout history, it has been associated with small landowners.

This is was interesting line to research and write about as I never imagined having anyone in my lineage trace back to Colonial America, never mind some who resided in Salem, Massachusetts during the Witch Trials.

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The surname MILK first appeared on record in America in 1662 with the mention of John Milk of Salem, Massachusetts in the town vital records where he was appointed as Cowherd for the town of Salem and then was chosen to chimney sweep.  Screen Shot 2017-06-04 at 6.19.18 PM.png

In Colonial America in 1662, The Massachusetts Bay Colony’s charter was accepted by England as long as they extended the vote to all landowners and allowed for freedom of worship for Anglicans.

The home of John Milk was listed in “(Rambles in Old Boston, by Rev, Edward G. Porter, 1887, p.288.) It was built some fifty years earlier than the Paul Revere home some 300 feet away across a little Square from the corner of Sun Court and Moon Street, just south of the Old North Church and North of Faneuil Hall “the Cradle of Liberty” near Milk Street.

IMMIGRANT Family 

John Milk I  (B: 1640 Norfolk, England, D: Nov 26 1689 – Salem, Massachusetts) m. Sarah Weston (Wesson) (B: 1656 – Salem, Massachusetts, D: 1685 – Salem, Massachusetts) on m. 3 APR 1665

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From the Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988

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John Milk I died on Nov 26 1689.  The following is his Last Will & Testament:

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FIRST Generation

John Milk II: (B: Jan 8 1668 – Salem, Massachusetts, D: 1720 Boston, Massachusetts), shipwright, married:

(1) Elizabeth Hempfield (1670 – 1707), daughter of Edmund Hempfield of Salem, on 20 Aug. 1689.

Children of first marriage

  • John Milk, b. abt. 1690, died young
  • Job Milk

(2)  Mary Scolly (Scolby) at Boston, 30 Oct. 1707, who subsequently married Francis Hudson abt ****

Children of second marriage:

  • John Milk III, b. 23 June 1708/09, m. Jane Marvin (Marvel)
  • James Milk, b. 31 Jan. 1710/11, m. (1)Sarah Brown ; (2) Mrs. Mollie Peering
  • Mary Jane Milk, b. abt. 1713

My lineage follows the marriage to Elizabeth Hempfield (B:  Jan 8 1668 – Salem, Massachusetts, D: 1707 – Salem, Massachusetts).

The below excerpt talks about their homestead and surrounding buildings.

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Close-up of 1700 map showing John Milk lot in yellow (located on current day Washington St somewhere around Federal or Bridge Streets)

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SECOND Generation

Job Milk I (B: 1695 – Salem, Massachusetts, D: 1778 in Little Compton, Newport County, Province of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations) m.  Abigail Devol (B: 1695 – Newport, Rhode Island, D: 12 Jul 1719 – Dartmouth, Massachusetts) on July 12 1719 in Little Compton, RI.  Abigail was the daughter of Johnathan + Hannah (née Audley).

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Note: The association and acceptance by the Quakers of the time, imply that Job Milk and his family were probably Quakers. Although there are no known records of this, it is recorded that Phineas Chase, who lived close to Job Milk, and was father to two of Job’s sons-in-law was a Quaker.

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Footnote:  Some information has been borrowed in part from: History And Genealogy Of The Milk-Milks Family – October 15, 2011 by Grace CroftLee MilkGrace Irene Barnhart.  This information was only borrowed for the sake of completing an accurate family portrait of my lineage to the Milk family as early settlers and not for any wage or profit.


THIRD Generation

Job Milk II (B: April 17 1725 – Dartmouth, Massachusetts, D: 1804 – Dartmouth, Massachusetts) m. Amy Fish (B: Oct 29 1729 – Dartmouth, Massachusetts, D: Belkshire, Massachusetts).  He married Amy Fish 2 Nov 1746 at Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island.  Amy Fish was born at Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts 29 Oct 1729 daughter of Thomas Fish and Mercy Mary Coggeshall .

They were the parents of 9 children:
Benjamin Milk born 1747.
Sarah Milk born 1749. 
Job Milk born 1751.
Mary Milk born 1752.
Jonathan Milk born 1755.
David Milk born 1757.
Cabel Milk born 1759.
Thomas Ambrose Milk born 1761.
Amy Milk born 1763.


FOURTH Generation

Sarah Milk (B: 1749 – D: Eardley,) m. Dudley Moore (B: 1747 – Nine Partners, Duchess, New York,  D: 1815: Eardley, (Hull) Québec). They married at Saratoga, New York .

Dudley Moore’s parents were Jedediah Moore and Dorothy Begnell (I’ll get more into the “Bicknell” story in another blog).

They were the parents of 9 children:
Sarah Moore born Abt 1769.
Jedediah Moore born Abt 1771.
Dudley Moore born 8 Aug 1773.
Roger Moore born Abt 1774. 
Benjamin Moore born Abt 1776.
Martin Moore born Abt 1779.
Job Moore born Abt 1781.
David Moore born Abt 1783.
Rebecca Moore born Abt 1785.


FIFTH Generation

Roger Moore (B: 1775 – Rutland, Vermont, D: 1860 – Napean, Ontario) m.  Sarah Hicks (B: 1775 – New York,  D: Nov 27 1872 – Québec)


SIXTH Generation

Olive Moore (B: Sept 10 1821 – Napean, Ontario, D: 1871 – Eardley, Québec) m.  Ambrose Richards (B: Feb 27 1816 – Quebec,  D: Jan 9 1864 – Eardley, Québec)

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SEVENTH Generation

George Richards (B: July 26 1859 – Eardley Quebec, D: April 16 1942 – Mattawa Ontario) m.  Cecelia McKenzie (B: Dec 9 1851 – Renfrew Ontario, D: Sept 13 1921 – Mattawa Ontario)

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EIGHTH Generation 

Ambrose Richards (B: Dec 12 1887 – Mattawa Ontario, D: 1957 – Mattawa Ontario) m. Bridget Angelina Mullen (B: Jan 3 1887 – Vinton, Québec, D: April 10 1976 – Témiscaming, Québec)

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NINTH Generation

Benjamin Richards (B: Feb 10 1916 – Sturgeon Falls Ontario, D: June 17 1977 – Montréal, Québec) m.  Sarah Ann Lee (B: Dec 7 1922 – Meltham Mills, Yorkshire England, D: March 1993 – Montréal, Quebec)


TENTH Generation

Patrick James Richards (B: Jan 15 1954 – Témiscaming Québec, D: Nov 18 2014 – Témiscaming, Québec) m.  Mona Lamothe (B: Jan 20 1956 – Bonfield, Ontario, D: —-)


ELEVENTH Generation

MOI – Tina Rose Richards


I found this helpful when trying to better understand the difference between the Quakers, the Pilgrims and the Puritans.

Pilgrims: A small group of people arrived in the New World from England on a ship named the Mayflower. They landed at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts. Back in England, everyone had to belong to the Church of England. The Pilgrims did not want to belong to the Church of England. They were seeking religious freedom from the Church of England. 

Puritans: About 10 years later, a large group of people called the Puritans arrived in the New World, also from England. They believed everyone should belong to the Church of England or be punished. They left England and came to the New World because they believed the Church of England needed to be purified. In their opinion, the Church was embracing too many Catholic beliefs. They settled in Boston. They practiced religious intolerance. They wanted to be part of the Church of England, but they wanted the church’s beliefs purified. 

Alike: Both groups spoke English. Both groups arrived from England at about the same time. Both groups thought of themselves as Englishmen and were loyal to the King. Both groups came to the New World because of their disagreement with the Church of England.

Quakers: There was another religious group in the colonies called the Quakers. They also disagreed with the Church of England. Many Quakers left England for the New World. They settled in Pennsylvania in the 1600s. There, they practiced religious freedom for everyone. People were free to believe what they wanted and talk to God in their own way. People from all over Europe poured into their communities, seeking religious freedom. The Quakers believed that violence was not the way to solve problems. The Quakers were known as “The Friends”.

Namaste

T xo

Featured Image Photo Cred: Map of Salem Village in 1692 physical features, and the dwellings of prominent and important residents in Salem during 1692.

On Genealogy: Story of Pte. Émile Lamothe

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 10.16.14 PMGenealogy story #4 features my Great Grand Father, Émile Lamothe, whom I called Grand-Pépère Lamothe.  I figured since my last two blogs featured the other Veterans in my family, that I’d continue on that note.

Cleophas Émile Lamothe was born on June 10, 1897, in Bonfield, Ontario to Marie Louise Charron, age 38, and Joseph Magloire Lamothe, age 42.  For those of you who don’t know where Bonfield is (and I don’t blame you, I’d actually be more surprised if you actually knew where it was), it’s a small township in Northeastern Ontario, located on the north shore of Lake Nosbonsing in Nipissing District.

Émile enlisted on May 13 1918 to the 1st Depot Batallion, 1st Central Ontario Regiment. Regimental #3037591.

Screen Shot 2017-05-31 at 11.53.15 PMThere was some question as to whether he volunteered or whether he was drafted.  So, I did some research, turns out volunteers for the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) were questioned at the place of enlistment to complete the two-sided Attestation papers which included the recruit’s name and address, next-of-kin, date and place of birth, occupation, previous military service, and distinguishing physical characteristics. Recruits were asked to sign their Attestation papers, indicating their willingness to serve overseas. By contrast, men who were drafted into the CEF under the provisions of the Military Service Act (1917) completed a far simpler one-sided form which included their name, date of recruitment, and compliance with requirements for registration.  Having reviewed his Attestation Papers/Particulars of Recruit – I was able to deduct that grand-pépère was drafted.

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 8.59.58 PMÉmile was short in stature, only 5’2.5″ and was 20 years and 11 months old when he enlisted.  He was noted as being single and a Farmer.  He was listed a Class One, Category A2.

Assessments were made by medical officers as to the suitability of men to perform military duties. A system of lettering and numbering was devised to enable a mans abilities to be quickly noted. Class One meant he was single and Category A meant that he was able to march, see to shoot, hear well and stand active service conditions.  The 2 meant that he was fit for dispatching overseas as regards to physical and mental health but required training.

The other thing I wanted to investigate further was  the Depot Battalion.  At first I had no idea what a Depot Battalion even was.  It turns out that in 1917-1918, when it was no longer possible to recruit enough men for infantry battalions, depot battalions were organized in Canada to obtain personnel who would then be sent to the Canadian Reserve Battalions in England.

Émile was initially part of the 1st Depot Battalion, 1st Central Ontario Regiment.  What I have been able to find out so far is that it was authorized by General Order 89 of September 1 1917 (see below) and by General Order 57 of 15 April 1918. They were to reinforce the 4th, 19th, 123rd and 208th Battalions through the 3rd Canadian Reserve Battalion.  They were commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel B. H. Belson.

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His military records are quite scant to be honest and contain only about 15 pages in total.  So, I’m not able to get a really good idea of what he did in The Great War.  All I know thus far is that on August 20 1918 he TOS (took on strength) at Bramshott Military Camp.

I don’t have his regiment’s war diaries and mobilization accounts, I will have to request them in person, but, I believe I have found the reference to them and can find them at the Canadian National Archives when I go to Ottawa later this month.  However, there’s a snag – I see from his personal file that he’s noted under 3 separate regiments – 1st Depot Battalion, 1st Central Regiment, then the 1st Depot Battalion, 2nd Quebec Regiment and 1st Depot Battalion 10th Canadian Reserve Battalion.  But, I cannot decipher when he was SOS from one and TOS (took on strength) with another.  This is important for tracking his movement in the war diaries.

June 20 2017 Update:  Spent the day at the National Archives of Canada today.  The assistant working at the genealogy desk provided me with some information I had been seeking.  She said that as part of a depot battalion and because we can only find him in England – that he likely did not see “action”. He would have been training and keeping in shape over his time in one of the military camps, in the event that he was called up to infantry for one of the battalions they were backing up.  She further added that there are not likely war diaries for depot battalions, but if there was they would not be very interesting, but that I could check the records anyway.  

All WWI military records are available online, so I was able to access his WWI Canadian Expeditionary Force Personnel File via Ancestry.ca (the site I am doing my family tree on).  You can also access them through the archives website.

I am just now taking in that these documents are 100 years old, I am going to post as many documents as I possibly can!


Military Records Summary

May 13 1918:  Attested at North Bay, Ontario

July 21 1918: Embarked at Québec

August 8 1918:  Arrived London, England via the S.S. Somali – she was built in 1901 by Caird & Company Greenock and served as a troop carrier in WWI

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Photo: dated 1st August 1914  – SS Somali serving as a Hospital ship

August 20 1918: TOS at Bramshott a.k.a. Bramshott Military Camp, which was a temporary army camp set up on Bramshott Common, Hampshire, England during WWI. Bramshott was one of three facilities in the Aldershot Command area established by the Canadian Army. The permanent facility on both occasions was at the British Army’s Bordon Military Camp. Bramshott was one of two temporary camps set-up for additional accommodation in the lead-up to D-Day, along with Witley Camp.

November 11, 1918 – WWI ends – Armistice

Feb 19 1919:  In Ripon he was admonished and condemned to pay 1/9.5 (confirmed as 1 pound, 9 schillings, 5 pence) for losing 1 scrubber (??? What kind of post did he after the war ended that he would have that he lost a scrubber?  Did he work in a mess hall?  Did he work in a medical unit? Was it for scrubbing his boots?)  The only notation I’ve found that can be somewhat related to war is a breathing apparatus that absorbs the carbon dioxide . But I don’t think that would be it because this has specifically to do with diving.  

June 20 2017 Update:  Genealogy Assistant at National Archives advised that he literally lost a “scrubber” for cleaning.  The reason she believes this is that he was there well after the war ended and was likely involved in clean up tasks.  Given the price he was penalized to pay, she thinks it was likely a long handled scrubber.

June 14 1919: SOS (struck off strength) at Ripon – was now a part of the 10th Reserve Battalion.  He was likely transferred to this Battalion as the other battalions he was part of demobilized and returned home.

Belgic4th-bJune 23 1919:  Embarked at Liverpool on the SS Belgic. The White Star Line vessel was to be named Ceric & intended to replace Titanic in 1914. The outbreak of WWI changed all of that.  During construction, White Star decided to go with the name of Belgic IV. She was launched in Jan 1914, but was not yet completed when WWI  began later that year and the work was stopped. Belgic IV  was eventually completed in 1917, but as a troop transport and freighter rather than the passenger liner she was designed to be.

July 1 1919:  Disembarked in Halifax, NS

July 3 1919:  Discharged due to Demobilization

Here’s a map of of where I’ve been able to locate Émile while in the UK (pinned are: Ripon, London, Liverpool and Bramshott)

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QUESTION:  DOES ANYONE KNOW WHY HE WOULD HAVE STAYED IN ENGLAND AS LONG AS HE DID  AFTER THE WAR HAD ENDED?

June 20 2017 Update:  While at the Canadian Archives, the genealogy assistant informed me that some of the troops had to stay overseas longer to clean and pack up.  Not everyone was able to go home right after Armistice, and there were only a limited supply of troop ships, so everyone had to take turns to return. The sick, injured, infirmed were sent home first.  The abled bodied men, were left to clean.

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After being discharged from the military he returned to Bonfield.  He married Marcella Houle on September 27, 1927. They had three children (Thelma, Clifford and Edward) during their marriage.

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Copy of their marriage certificate – he was a taxi driver!

When I was young we’d drive up to visit them from Kitchener, it was about a 5-6 hour drive.   They lived at 217 Yonge Street.  I haven’t been there since 1993 (the day of grand-mémère Lamothe’s funeral) and the house has long been sold.   I remember it was a white and light green house, with a large wrap around veranda.  I always thought the house was cool and creepy at the same time, because it was so old. It was grand-mémère Lamothe’s parents place – she was born there.  When you’d walk in, you’d immediately walk into the living room (to the left) and the stair case to go upstairs was  to your right, it had a white railing.  I remember grand-mémère rocking away in her chrome glider , by the window, watching her shows.

The room immediately to the right when you walked in the front door used to be a parlour and as a child that totally creeped me when out they told me what it had been used for, but, that was in the days well before funeral parlours. Nonetheless, I could always envision dead people in there.  I remember they’d put their Christmas tree up in there and that’s where the whole lot of us would open gifts before/after midnight mass at St. Bernadette’s.

When you walked toward the back of the house from the entrance, I recall there being a long dining table before you stepped through a single door to the kitchen.  Just before you entered the kitchen (on the right hand side) there was a cabinet, that’s where Grand-Mémère would hide all of the goodies – and where I may or may not have snuck a few extra pieces of licorice.   The kitchen must have been to be an addition,  I’m sure of it.  It was big (or seemed big for a 12 year old) and filled with white cabinets.  There was a kitchen table in there with a bench, and on the back wall was a picture of The Last Supper.  They never had a bath tub or shower in the house, we’d have to bathe in the kitchen sink.

Grand-mémère would get up very early in the mornings – and when we’d come down she’d make us peach or maple soupan (French slang for porridge) and the best Map-O-Spread toasts.

Photos above:

  • Left  – “The cousins” (Mona, Darlene and Doreen) and their children (Mona: Tina & Darryl), (Darlene: Lisa, Francine & Stephanie), (Doreen: Sylvie, Ginette and Stephanie).  Note the green colour of the house and the laundry station.
  • Top Right – “June 1984” – Mom Mona, Me, Darryl, Grand-Pépère and Grand-Mémère and Pépère.  Note the white cabinets!
  • Bottom Right – “Grand-Pépère’s 87th Birthday” at Ma Tante Thelma and Uncle Rene’s in Bonfield.

There were two doors in the kitchen – one exiting to the veranda toward the front and the other going out the the old step up laundry washing area/ line they had (see photo above).  They never owned a dryer. Grand-mémère did all of the laundry by hand and hung it out back on the line to dry.  Now by hand I mean, she had an old fashioned washing machine where you would wash it and then you had to take the piece of clothes and put it in a wringer and it would fall in a big bucket of clean cool water to rinse, then she would take it out of the rinse water and wring it again – so to me that is still by hand!

Coming from a generation that they did, and the house sourcing from a well, I’m sure they were afraid of the well running dry – at night time we had a large marmite (pot) at the top of the stairs to pee in, if we had to go.  Grand-mémère would empty it when she got up in the morning.  I also remember that the rooms didn’t have doors, they had curtains – and that there were 3 bedrooms plus theirs which was at the front of the house.   Come to think of it, I don’t think I was ever in their room.

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At Grand-Pépère & Grand-Mémère Lamothe’s in Bonfield, 1981

I remember Grand-pépère fiddling around in the back tool shed.  I remember going in there as a child and thinking “wow this place is filled with really cool old junk”. 

They had a garden out back and had a rain barrel that they’d collect water in to water their garden.

I remember the house wasn’t too far from the train tracks cause I would hear it whistling at night time.

It’s when you sit here and reminisce on your life that you wish you had the thirst for knowledge then like you do now.  The things I would love to have asked Grand-pépère;  from 1897 to 1992 he must have seen soooo many crazy things!  He went from a seeing the first Ford Model T to a Lamborghini.  He went from coal and wood fires to electricity, telephones and tv’s all during HIS LIFETIME.  He saw two World Wars and was at one of them.  Oh the stories  Grand-pépère would have told me as he puffed on his pipe and  sat on the front veranda.

Émile Lamothe died on April 17, 1992, in his hometown at the age of 94.

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I Googled what their house at 217 Yonge Street looks like today … disappointing – it hardly looks at all like the house in my memories.  It looks run down and dilapidated 😦

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Photo: circa 2014

Namaste

T xo


On Genealogy: Story of Pte. Benjamin Richards

Hello and welcome to blog #3 on genealogy!   This story features my Grampa – Benjamin George Richards.

I was able to obtain a copy of Grampa’s war records from the Dept. of Veterans Affairs (Canadian Armed Forces) a few years ago, when I wrote out for them.  WWII records are still not available online.

Military records are such a wealth of information!  You can see their enlistment details, their pay, when they took on strength (TOS) or were struck off strength (SOS), when they were AWOL/AWL, their discharge information and so much more!  Grampa’s records are in hard copy and some of the handwriting is a wee bit difficult to read and the acronyms are insane, I had to go online just to find a summary of WWII military acronyms to make sense of 1/2 of them!

When Benjamin George Richards was born on February 10, 1916, in Sturgeon Falls, Ontario, his father, Ambrose, was 28 and his mother, Bridget (née Mullen), was 29.

His military records indicated that he completed grade VIII, and was bilingual in English in French.  From 1933 to the date of his military enlistment he was employed at Canadian International Paper (CIP) Company as a Machine Tender in Témiscaming, Québec – working his way up from a General Labourer.

His records also noted that his hobbies and past times to be skiing, skating, playing 1st base in baseball/softball and playing the banjo, guitar & mandolin.

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Photo: Benny playing the guitar (left).  Date unknown – the photo was just labelled that it was in the 1940’s, assumedly it was after he was discharged from the military in 1945.

He enlisted in the military on September 11 1939 at North Bay, Ontario citing “patriotic reasons”, he wanted to be in the Carrier Platoon.  Capt. R. Robillard noted that he was of “average intelligence – should be ok for Carriers” .  He was appointed as a Private to The Royal Regiment of Canada.  Regimental Number B-66965.

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Now, as I mentioned the record of all appointments, transfers, postings, forfeitures of pay, accidents, hospital admissions etc are difficult to read and are FILLED with acronyms to the point where some entries are barely even understandable  – one website I was using had over 7500 unique abbreviations listed!  Grampa Benny has 5 years worth of military records here to detail, so I am just going to note the most salient points in chronological order.  Most of the records document when he was SOS or when he was TOS.  There are some notations albeit them difficult to make out when he was transferred to different platoons.

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Chronological Record of Service

The Royal Regiment of Canada, C.A.S.F. was mobilized on September 1 1939, when the Second World War broke out.

Sept 11 1939:  Enlisted at North Bay, Ontario citing “patriotic reasons”.  Private, Infantry,  The Royal Regiment of Canada.

June 10 1940:  Embarked from Halifax for garrison duty in Iceland with “Z” Force.  Now this is actually an interesting story and part of history.   As I was going through Grampa’s personnel file, I noticed something beside ONE entry as he embarked for the United Kingdom,  all it said was “SOS Z Force”,  it had me wondering “what the heck was this Z Force?”.  So I did a Google search and found that it was a British-Canadian garrison force in Iceland.  I was pointed to a really interesting document which was declassified on March 17 1987 entitled “Z Force in Iceland:  An Account of the despatch of Canadian Troops to Iceland and their subsequent operations there”.  The document deals with the activities of Z force Canadian Army from the time it was dispatched to Iceland June 10 1940 to its departure on April 28 1941.

Canada was an occupying military power in one of the smallest and most isolated countries in the world.  How?  Why?  Turns out when war broke out in September 1939, Denmark and Iceland jointly declared their neutrality (Iceland was granted status as an autonomous state from Denmark after WWI).  The Nazis had shown an interest in Iceland throughout the 1930s, sending trade missions and flying instructors to the island. Several teams of German “anthropologists” also roamed Iceland in the late 1930s.   As quickly as possible Canada put together a military expedition mysteriously dubbed “Z Force.”  So Canada was in Iceland to defend it against a possible German attack!

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This snippet from the report indicates that as part of the Royal Regiment of Canada he was part of the initial Z Force commanded by Lt-Col G. Headley Basher.

The force boarded the Empress of Australia on June 9, and departed on June 10 at 1:00 pm.  It was the only infantry battalion, and was armed with 12 Lewis machine guns.

June 16 1940:  Disembarked Reykjavík, Iceland

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The Royals were ferried ashore and marched through silent streets to set up tents (followed 4 months later by Metal Nissen huts) near the local airfield that British engineers had begun expanding. Within days of the Canadians arrival, the British brigades packed up and sailed back to join the war.

I was able to find out that while in Iceland, Benny was a member of C Coy (Company)  – I almost missed it, it was mentioned on only 1 page – under Current Service “R.R.C. Rgmt C Coy”

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The Empress of Australia, meanwhile, sailed back to Hailfax where the rest of Z Force had been assembled.  That secondary force consisted of two more battalions — the Cameron Highlanders and les Fusiliers Mont-Royal who arrived in Iceland on July 9, 1940.

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The report indicates the supply and maintenance problems while they occupied Iceland.

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Another issue was transportation.  Apparently only the R. Regt C brought its own transportation.  The second flight Z Force which arrived on July 7 was not so fortunate, no vehicles were sent with them.  This happened movement of the troops because the only troop to have vehicles was on the other side of the island, so they had to hire civilian trucks.  This was an issue until the arrival of the S.S. Tregarthen on July 27 – which took 16 days to unload.

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Other issues included the fact that the British coats were better, as they Canadian sheepskin coats were almost in a state of constant wetness.  And, they needed to be sent steel tent pegs 3 ft long because the ground was always frozen and the winds were nearly gale force.

We know that he was in C Coy but not which platoon in that company he was in, but we do have an idea of what training looked like.

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So it turns out the biggest threats to the Canadians were the cold – it snowed in August 1940 — and the local moonshine, known as “Black Death.”

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In total, Z Force ended up amounting to 2,659 Canadian soldiers stationed in Iceland.

The order was given that the bulk of Z Force was to leave for Britain.  They settled down and awaited their British relief force. They were relived by the 70 British Infantry Brigade.

Oct 26 1940:  Embarked on the Empress of Australia and on Oct 31 1940 at 10:30 a.m. the ships weighed anchor and put out for the UK, leaving Iceland behind. A small force was left behind (Cameron Highlanders).

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The graves of 41 Canadian soldiers, seamen and airmen who died in Iceland during the war are still tended carefully in a cemetery near the airport they defended.

The Report ends saying that ” …. the morale of the Canadian Forces in Iceland remained satisfactory throughout their tour in that northern outpost”.

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Nov 3 1940:  Disembarked in the United Kingdom/Great Britain- no notation as to where.

Nov 7 1940: The unit was re-designated as the 1st Battalion, the Royal Regiment of Canada, CASF, when a 2nd Battalion was formed to provide reinforcements to the Regiment in Europe.

Dec 9 1940: Admitted to CMC Bordon and was discharged Dec 16 1940.

Jan 17 1941:  Awarded 4 days CB (confined to barracks) for AA (Army Act) Sec. 19 – Drunkeness, 1st offence.

Feb 10 1941: SOS (struck off strength) – admitted to hospital.  Discharged on Feb 18 1941.

April 1 1941:  Forfeits 5 days pay for AWL (absent without leave) 1 hr 36 mins.

Feb 25 1942: Admitted to hospital, discharged March 4 1942.

From Feb 27 1942 to Aug 26 1942 – We know that he was part of the 2nd Canadian Divisional Infantry Reinforcement Unit (2 CDIRU) – On Carrier, the Carrier Instructor C –— Now during this time the 2 CDIRU were involved in The Dieppe Raid During on 19 August 1942 where the Allies launched a major raid on the small French coast port of Dieppe.  In the early morning hours, Major-General J.H. Roberts’ 2nd Canadian Infantry Division assaulted the Dieppe beach at four designated sections. 2nd Canadian Infantry Division assaulted the Dieppe beach at four designated sections. At Blue Beach, at the village of Puys (1.6 km east of Dieppe), troops of The Royal Regiment of Canada and The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada arrived late in their bid to take out enemy artillery and machine guns guarding the Dieppe beaches. From the start the enemy pinned down and shot them up until the raid was over.

I have to keep scouring the records to see if I can find out exactly where Grampa was during this time.  Again, his  Troops War Diaries will be helpful once I obtain them — UPDATE:  I found a notation that he attended a Carrier Course (Class A) with 2 CDIRU from March 18/42 to April 18/42 and a Motorcycle course with 2 CDIRU from Aug 8/42 to Aug 22/42.

Aug 27 1942 to Oct 9 1942: He was with the RRC Regt HQ Company “as a Carrier Driver – H (20 days)”. 

Oct 10 1942 to —- He was back again with the 2 CDIRU in general fatigues

March 17 1943: Granted daily rate of $1.50.

Dec 28 1943: Awarded 8 days CB and 8 days pay under Sec 40 of AA – I had to do some research here.  The Gov’t of Canada, Library and Archives Canada website has S.40 under Miscellaneous Military Offences – “Acting to the Prejudice of Good Order and Military Discipline”.  Unfortunately the records don’t actually mention for what specifically.

UPDATE: What I’ve been able to ascertain is that it may have been for: Falsely obtaining or prolonging leave aka he was AWOL.

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Jan 15 1944:  Awarded The Canadian Volunteer Service Medal (CVSM), The CVSM is 757d98c3-5c61-4304-846a-86aac299c914-1granted to persons of any rank in the Naval, Military or Air Forces of Canada who voluntarily served on Active Service and honourably completed eighteen months total voluntary service from 3 September 1939 to 1 March 1947.  A silver clasp, a maple leaf at its centre, was awarded for 60 days service outside Canada.

May 30 1945:  Granted permission to marry Miss Sally Anne Lee on or after (but not before) June 14 1945.

June 20 1945:  Married with permission to Miss Sarah Ann Lee in Agbrigg, Yorkshire, England.  Changed next of kin to Mrs. Sarah Ann Richards (wife) of 14 Pick Hiss Rd, Meltham Yorkshire, England.

Aug 18 1945:  Granted 30 days disembarkment leave from Aug 18 to Sept 16 1945 and was authorized to draw $0.50 per diem

Sept 2 1945:  WWII ends

Sept 21 1945:  SOS on discharge.  Clothing allowance and Rehab paid.

On December 31 1945, after the Second World War had come to an end, the Royal Regiment of Canada was disbanded and reverted back to Reserve status.

Now , we know with certainty that Grampa was a Driver Mechanic and Instructor in a Carrier Platoon.  There is some discussion online about what these roles actually entail.

It was my impression that Driver/Mechanics typically did field maintenance on the Bren/Universal carriers mostly in Support Company.  But, now I’m confused, because I’ve also read that each Universal Carrier (tank) had a crew of four, an NCO (Non-Commissioned Officer), driver-mechanic and two riflemen  (see below)

The unique concept of the Universal Carrier Platoon was to provide every Infantry Battalion with the ability to move a small portion of its establishment under armoured protection.

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Typical Carrier Platoon

A Carrier Platoon existed in each battalion as part of Support Company. The platoon provided the battalion commander with a relatively mobile force, armed with automatic weapons, and relatively safe from small arms’ fire. The platoon carried out a variety of missions, such as the re-supply of food, ammunition, water and other necessities; casualty evacuation, reconnaissance and even in rare cases assaults on enemy position.

The hard thing with writing about war is that those who have served don’t generally come home and talk about their experiences.  The fact is that many veterans did indeed take their stories to the grave, for a variety of reasons. Some came home from up to six years of continuous overseas service and simply wished to forget the whole thing, to pick up their lives as best they could. Others saw no point in reliving the horrors safely buried away under iron-hard layers of protective silence. Still others learned very quickly upon their return to Canada that the civilian populace had no understanding of, and little interest in, the hardships they endured. For thousands of their children, this meant growing up with little other than a vague notion that ‘dad was in the war’.

Through the internet, a legion of veterans’ descendants (myself included) have taken it upon themselves to research their ancestors pasts, if for no other reason than to gain a better understanding of ‘what he went through’ and to ensure their legacy lives on for generations – so that their sacrifices don’t ever get forgotten.

To that very point, I asked my uncle Kenny if he knew what Grampa did in the war – “I’m not 100% sure he never spoke much about what he did”.  But keeping things to themselves also detracts from their personal history as well (but I totally get why they don’t talk about it).  Uncle Kenny said he was pretty sure that Grampa  ” … was a driver but not in tanks, more truck/troop carriers.  Seems I remember hearing somewhere that he may of driven ambulances too”.  

So what did Grampa actually do in the war?  At this point, I don’t really know and it’s hard for me to even make a logical deduction because I can hardly make sense of where he was in the UK – again due to the cryptic records and not yet having access to his Troops War Diaries.

Of the 20+ pages of material I have in my possession, I can only pinpoint 3 military camps he was at, all of the other entries all just say  “UK” – He was noted as being in camps at Witley, Aldershot and Bordon.

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Photo: Witley Camp Canteen

a) Witley Military Camp was a temporary army camp set up on Witley Common, Surrey, England during both the First and Second World Wars.  Camp Witley was one of three facilities in the Aldershot Command area established by the Canadian Army; the others being Bordon and Bramshott.

b) Camp Bordon has a long association with the Canadian Army, providing a base for them in both world wars.

c) Camp Aldershot –  some 330,000 Canadians passed through Aldershot, doing there training before taking up the defence of the UK while most of the British soldiers were away.

I’ve mapped out the 3 places I was able to place him.  Surrey, Aldershot and Bordon.

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Benjamin Richards was oversees (Iceland and UK)  for a total of 62 months and was discharged from the military on September 21, 1945, in Toronto, Ontario, when he was 29 years old.

According to his Discharge Certificate and his Record of Service, he is “to return to civil life – on demobilization”.  His physical description at the time of discharge from service was “brown eyes and brown hair. Fair complexion. Burn scar on right axillae; scar 1.5″ x 1″ on inside of lip”.

His CONFIDENTIAL Discharge Papers note his future plans “I am returning to my former job as a machine tender”.  

The military’s recommendation on discharge were as follows:

“A recently married man, 29 years of age, medium build, average appearance.  Seems pleasant, steady, reliable labour type”.

” … Richards states that his mother and sister are living in Temiskaming; father has been confined to hospital for about four years.  Richards married in England and expects his wife to join him in a few months.  They can live with his mother until they secure a house through the paper company, who are building homes for returning service personnel.

In view of physical fitness and experience, Richards seems well advised to return to his former employment”.  

If he was unable to return as a Machine Tender, he planned to seek employment as a Truck Driver.

He and Sally had seven children during their marriage.  In connecting with my uncle Kenny and my aunt Gwen (I wish my dad was still alive so I could ask him some if this) –  they moved in to 102 Anvik Avenue in or about 1955.

At that time Témiscaming was a company (CIP) town and the company owned everything including the homes. The Company sold the houses in or about 1972, Sally and Benny bought theirs. The row house was tiny.  4 rooms total (living room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, 1 washroom). It was only 2 stories, no basement. Aunty Gwen remembers them digging out the basement until they hit a big rock … but, they were able to move the furnace down there.  Only the front bedroom had closet space … Grampa built one in the back room for the 3 girls … that and a double bed.  The bathroom had a toilet and bathtub … no sink.  They were 9 living there – 7 kids,  2 adults.  There was also an enclosed, unheated back porch.  The whole space was about 600 sq ft.  The address was originally 502 Elm Ave, but the Dutch Elm disease killed all the Elm trees ands the town renamed it Anvik Ave and renumbered the houses….. the number became 102 instead of 502.

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Photo: 102 Anvik Ave is the row house with the brown door on the right side (circa 2014)

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Benjamin Richards died on June 17, 1977, in Montréal, Quebec, at the age of 61. He suffered a coronary thrombosis while visiting his daughter Gwen and son-in-law Serge and grandson Marc.

I was only 3 years old at the time grampa passed away, so unfortunately I really don’t have any memories of him. I have a few a pictures of us but that’s it – again I wish you were here dad, to share this stuff with me 😭.

Gramma Sally ending up selling the house to Lucien Bernard for $6,000 in 1978 and moved to Verdun, Quebec to live with her daughter Gwen, son-in-law Serge and her grandkids Marc and Caroline.

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One of the most rewarding challenges I have accomplished in my genealogy journey is writing about these family stories and legacies so they don’t get lost.

I plan on making these blogs into a family history book. I am extremely passionate about recording family stories and encourage you to at every opportunity.

As I continue to investigate Benny’s time in WWII, I will update the blog.

Namaste

T xo

On Genealogy: Story of Pte. George V. Lee

Welcome to story #2 of my family tree. Today, I’m going to share with you the story of my paternal grandmother’s father’s brother  – my Great Grand Uncle, George Victor Lee who was killed in action (KIA) in The Great War.

For this story you’re going to have to stretch your memory all the way back to History class, WWI and trench warfare.  I was able to access his troop’s War Diaries and his personal military records.  I was able to track his regiment from deployment to the day Pte. Lee was KIA.  I did a lot of research and spent countless hours on trying to understand exactly what was going on during the war as he was progressing through it so I could make the story more 3 demential and personal to me and our family.  Some of the history parts of this story were “borrowed” from other story tellers well versed in history and the Great War. Some, is me being an amateur historian, war buff and genealogist.  I don’t purport this blog to be 100% factually accurate (about the details of the war). I am not a professional, just passionate.

Screen Shot 2017-05-27 at 10.40.15 PMThe deadline was 11:00 p.m. on August 4 1914. If Germany did not remove their troops from Belgium, Great Britain would declare war. As Big Ben struck the hour across the Thames that night, Chancellor David Lloyd George wrote, “The big clock echoes in our ears like the hammer of destiny.” Germany remained silent and Great Britain was at war!

At the time that Britain declared war, George Victor Lee was living at 3 Shady Row, Meltham Mills, Yorkshire, England with his wife Agnes (nee Dickenson).  He was the son of Tom Lee and Hannah (nee Crabtree).

George enlisted on March 24 1912 when he was 17 years old.   His Territorial Force Attestation Papers indicate that he worked as a Millhand (Cottons) with J. Brook Bros Ltd. A bit of research and I found out that Jonas Brook and Brothers was a silk mill complex in Meltham that employed over 1,000 workers during that time.

He was a member the 1/5th Battalion, The Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment).  Regimental Number: 1985.

The Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment) (Territorial Force) was mobilized on August 4 1914 at Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, later that month the troop was deployed to coastal defences near Hull and Grimsby.  On November 5 1914 it moved to Doncaster in billets and the regiment was assigned to the 147th (2nd West Riding) Brigade in the 49th (West Riding) Division in April 1915 for service on the Western Front, they served together until the Armistice in November 1918.

They were gearing up to take their place in history in what is now known as The Battle of Aubers Ridge (May 9-10 1915), which was a disastrous attack that cost 11,000 British casualties for no material gain: it was a supporting operation to a much larger French attack.

The British attack was to be launched by General Sir Douglas Haig’s First Army. It was intended to attack on two fronts, to the North and South of Neuve Chapelle, with the hope that the two attacking forces could meet up behind the German front lines. Haig had requested extra artillery to increase the strength of the 40 minute bombardment planned for the morning of 9 May, but all available artillery reserves had been sucked into the fighting at the second battle of Ypres, still raging just to the north.

From the army records I obtained, we know that on April 14 1915 The Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment) embarked for France and Flanders, landing at Boulogne. After which they traveled through Estaires in intense cold.

The War Diaries report that on April 16 1915, 2 days after disembarking, breakfast was late as the cook crew had a tough time recovering from the night prior.  They marched off around 10:00 a.m., the road was very bad.  Orders were given that every man must have a new pair of boots before they go out – they were only issued a few days before they left Doncaster.

At Estaires on April 19 1915 there was some reported shelling & artillery action.

On April 21 1915, some German shells were noted to have hit the trenches and an order was received to move to billets.

On April 28 1915 a shell hit 4Q, there were reported casualties.  The next day, a report was received from another trench that the enemy had been heard under his trench mining.

There was rain in the trenches and some shelling according to the War Diaries.  This coincides with the reports of the battle that heavy rain on May 6 and dense mist on May 7 caused a French postponement of the main attack; it would now go in on May 9 and the subsidiary attacks would happen at the same time, not a day later in accordance with the original strategy.

May 9 was a fine, sunny day.  The Battle of Aubers went ahead.  It was fought over the same ground as the battle of Neuve Chapelle, 10-13 March 1915.

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Photo: From this map you can see that 49th Div, 147th Brigade is not on the 1st line, but, they are near La Boutillerie

Except from the troop diaries:

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(transcription)

May 9 1915:  South of Fleurbaix:  

4:45 a.m. – artillery bombardment of enemy lines directed at Fromelles Ridge.  Batt’n in dug out move between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. from derelict houses

11:10 a.m. enemy shelled Fleurbaix, no 2945 Pte Prier slightly wounded

At 4:30 p.m. an HE (high explosive) shell burst among men of D Company @ Croix Marechal killing 4 and wounding 4.  The struggles of the 13th London Rgmt & East Lanes came in and stayed night bringing with them  “depressing and highly coloured accounts of action”.  

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May 10 1915:  4:35 p.m.  Nine shells fired at Fleurbaix.  Batt’n still in dugout.

The British attack on 9 May was a total failure. The Germans had greatly strengthened their lines around Neuve Chapelle after they had been overrun during Neuve Chapelle, and the British artillery bombardment was simply not heavy enough to destroy the new German lines.  The British troops went over the top early on the morning of 9 May and were cut down by German machine gun fire. No significant progress was made, and early on 10 May Haig ended the offensive. The British suffered 11,000 casualties in one day of fighting on a narrow front.

George came through that battle.  The British casualties in the Northern pincer on 9 May 1915 were  as follows:

  • 8th Division: 4,682 of which 192 were officers
  • 49th (West Riding) Division: 94 of which 2 were officers
  • 7th Division: 25 of which 1 was an officer

We are going to fast forward a few months.  In October 1915 – the troop is stationed at Canal Bank, North of Ypres taking over from the 1/8 West Yorks.  There was considerable activity with the enemy (trench mortars and bombs).  There was some 50 casualties of the 4th battalion after a bombardment by the Germans.

November 1915:

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If you find the diaries difficult to read, I’ve transcribed them for you:

Nov 1:  Much rain, transport mules fell into a trench in chateau grounds late during the evening.  Endeavoured for 2 hours to dig them out, one died meanwhile and the other had to be shot.

Nov 2:  Usual working parties at night

Nov 3:  Relieved at chateau by 8th Rifle Brigade.  This battalion relieved the 6th West Riding Regiment in Brigade Reserve in Farms left sector.  Coys were disposed as follows:  A – West Bank of Canada new bridge 6D, B Coy (company) dug outs at Hulls Farm, C Coy dug out at Modder Farm & Saragossa, D Coy Pelissier Farm Batton Headquarters Malakoff Farm.

Nov 4:  In occupation of farms.  Carried rations and stores for 6th W.R.R. in trenches

Nov 5:  In occupation of farms.  B Coy (company) shelled at Hulls Farm 1 casualty, 1 platoon removed to Malakoff.  

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Photo: Nov 30 1915: Summary of casualties for the month of November  ….. “Other ranks – killed by shell – 3”  Total casualties for the month 73

That one casualty as a result of B Company being shelled was my great grand uncle,  Pte George Lee. He is buried at Bard Cottage Cemetery, a British military cemetery located in the Belgian village of Boezinge, a town in Ypres . There are 1,643 dead commemorates, of whom 40 could not be identified. Boezinge made up the largest part of the war in the area occupied by the Allies, just opposite the German lines across the Ieper league between Ypres and the Iron . There are 1622 British, 15 Canadians, 2 South Africans and 4 Germans (1 of which are not identified). 

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Photo: Imperial War Graves Commission – Pte Lee’s headstone inscription, “HE SLEEPS WITH THE GLORIOUS DEAD THAT WE MIGHT LIVE”

I haven’t been able to locate any photos of him.  I wish their war records came with their military photo.  I am going to try and connect with some of my extended family who still live in England to see if they may have some.

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Photo: Bard Cottage Cemetery

I have a photo of his brother (my great grand father), Joseph Lee.

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Photo: Joseph Edward Lee (left) & friend (right)

Which oddly, I have his photo but cannot locate ANY war documents for him … at all.   This photo was given to me stating that it was a photo of “Joseph Lee & friend”.  I wonder, is that other gentleman in uniform really a friend?  Maybe it’s his brother George? They are both wearing WWI British military uniforms and were enlisted at around the same time I assume.  Does anyone have any other ideas how I can identify the man on the left in this photo or have any other source to locate Joseph Lee’s military records?  I’ve search Ancestry.ca high and low, I’ve searched Google, Forces War Records, The UK National Archives, and nothing.  I figure if he has a British uniform on, he has to at least have enlisted, even if he didn’t go to war, and every one who enlists at the very least must have a military file.  Any other thoughts would be appreciated!

 

 

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old. Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.” – Laurence Binyon

Of note: George Victor Lee’s death is noted in the article, Shady Row, Meltham Mills. “At least three men from Shady Row were killed in action during the First World War:

  • Private Joseph Crabtree of Shady Row was “killed instantly by a shell while stretcher bearing at the Front”
  • Private George Lee of 3 Shady Row, serving in the 5th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, was killed in action by a shell on 4 November 1915
  • Private W. Stokes (aged 21), son of F.W. and Rosa Stokes, of 11, Shady Row, was killed on 3 September 1916″

Namaste

T xo


 

On Genealogy: My 1st Blog on Ancestry!

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On Genealogy: My Relation to the First Colonists to New France. The First Documented Marriage Between a French Settler & Native American Woman and My relation to Louis Joliet, the French Explorer

I can be quite obsessive at times.  My latest past time is genealogy – I’ve been working on my family tree for years – but now I obsessively work on it, almost daily.  My interest is both historical and philosophical:  Where do I come from?  How am I here?  literally and figuratively.

I think people have a basic desire to know where they came from and how they got to where they are today.  The knowledge that my ancestors had great inner strength is a powerful motivator for trying to understand my place in the world.  I mean if it weren’t for them, I wouldn’t be here today typing these words.

I look at genealogy as history on a personal scale. It’s truly a journey of many lifetimes and lifelines from the past to the present and onto the future.  It’s about discovering your heritage, creating a story about your family and leaving the most amazing legacies for future generations.  At this stage of their lives, my children really don’t give a hootenanny about our roots, an in all honesty nor did I at their ages, but, as I’ve aged and gone through life experiences I wondered more and more.

Some lines I have been able to trace them back to the 1500/1600’s -> back to England and France, then who came to settle the New World.  As a result, and through different lines I am part Algonquin in different lines, and therefore Métis.  One of my ancestors was a Filles du roi – Kings Daughters.  I have a relative who was an explorer and helped to  chart the mighty Mississippi River.   Family who founded the eastern parts of the US, while others who lived in Salem Massachusetts during the Salem Witch Trials.  I had a great uncle who was KIA in the Great War.  I have my great grandfather’s and my grandfather’s military records and their units war diaries, I have been able to track them through their battles in both WWI and WWII.  I’ve found my grandmother’s arrival records on the Aquitania from when she arrived in Canada in 1946 as a War Bride.  I’ve found so many interesting things in my family history on both sides, down all 4 lines … It makes it all that more interesting when you know you have a personal connection to these people.

A few weeks ago I submitted my DNA to Ancestry (the genealogy website I am using to work on my family tree).  Genetic genealogy, is a way for people interested in family history to go beyond what they can learn from relatives or from historical documentation. Examination of DNA variations can provide clues about where a person’s ancestors might have come from and about relationships between families. They’ve confirmed it being received – now, all I have to do is wait patiently for another 6-8 weeks (it took them about 4 weeks to acknowledge receiving it) for the results.  Stay tuned!

We inherit from our ancestors gifts so often taken for granted. Each of us contains within this inheritance of soul. We are links between the ages, containing past and present expectations, sacred memories and future promise. – Edward Sellner

I have so many cool things to share with you all, but today I am going to share the story of my relation to one of the founders of our great nation – (Canada, for those of you reading this in another country).  Now, I can only be a certain percentage proud of this, since no European actually “discovered” North America – the natives were here long before any European or otherwise made their claims.

Ok, put on your history caps folks – we are going to take a trip back to the 1600’s.  I bet you don’t remember much about grade school history – but you may recall a bit about some of the explorers like Jacques Cartier, Louis Frontenac or Étienne Brûlé, maybe you remember the name of the famous French explorer, Samuel de Champlain who founded Québec City? Now, the super cool thing is that I do.  Being French Canadian – we learned all about this stuff in elementary school, and I’m sure if I dig hard enough through my boxes of childhood memories I have stuff on learning this – we learned about Les Premiers Colons, Marguerite Bourgeoys, les Amerindians, les seigneuries, les Jésuites.  And yes, I most certainly remember learning about Samuel de Champlain and les premiers colons.

 The first of my ancestors to come to la Nouvelle France/New France was a contemporary of Champlain’s. Olivier Le Tardif (sometimes spelled just Tardif), he was my 12th great-thumb_01_Olivier LeTardifgrandfather in the Lamothe line — but I can also trace him back in the Duchesne line via his son Guillaume.

w200.4200 A bit about Le Tardif:  (abt 1603-1665), the son of Jean Le Tardif and Clemence Houart, born at Estables, a seaside village on St. Brieuc Bay, in Brittany, France.   He embarked at Honfleur on May 24, 1618, onboard a ship of the Company of the merchants which was bringing back Samuel de Champlain to the colony. Le Tardif became the interpreter for Champlain in the languages of the Huron, Algonquin and les Montagnais. When Québec capitalizes, it is Le Tardif, elected by Samuel de Champlain, who gives the keys of the city to the brothers Louis and Thomas Kirke.

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First Settlers to New France/ Premier Colons de la Nouvelle France

While Olivier Le Tardif is the general clerk of the Compagnie des Cent-Associés/Hundred-Associates in Québec, and while his 1st wife,  Louise Couillard is still alive, he adopts Marie-Olivier Manitouabe8ich who is first documented Native America to marry a French settler – she marries Martin Prévost, in 1644 — now this is where it gets good —- she is also my ancestor from another line! You’ll have to read on for that relation.

Sticking to this story – it’s from Le Tardif’s second marriage on May 21 1648 to Barbe Émard/Aymard (while he was back in France) from which I descend.  Barbe was the widow of Gilles Michel.  Olivier’s first wife , Louise Couillard,  died seven years earlier.  He brought his new bride to Château Richer to live.  They had three children together.

I actually descend from TWO of their children as these lists show BUT on TWO different sides of my family – my maternal grand-mother and my maternal grand-father’s sides (who ended up marrying one another!)

Olivier LE TARDIF (abt 1604-1665) + Barbe ÉMARD (1625-1659)

Gen 1: Barbe Delphine LE TARDIF (1649-1702) + Jacques CAUCHON DIT LAMOTHE (1635-1685)

Gen 2: Jean Cauchon + Anne Bollard

Gen 3: Francois Cauchon dit Lamothe + Marie Francois Houde

Gen 4: Francois Cauchon dit Lamothe +Marie Laroche Rognon

Gen 5: Pierre Lamothe + Marie Anne Senet

Gen 6: Magloire Lamothe + Seraphine Gauthier

Gen 7: Joseph Lamothe + Marie Louise Charron

Gen 8: Emile LAMOTHE + Marcella Houle

Gen 9: Clifford LAMOTHE + Desneiges Duchesne

Gen 10: Mona Lamothe + Patrick RICHARDS

Gen 11: MOI — Tina RICHARDS

-AND-

Olivier LE TARDIF (abt 1604-1665) + Barbe ÉMARD (1625-1659)

Gen 1: Guillaume LE TARDIF (Jan 30 1656) + Marie Marguerite GAUDIN (Mar 1665-?)

Gen 2: Charles TARDIF + Marie Genevieve Le Roy

Gen 3: Jean Roch TARDIF + Marie Louise Grenier

Gen 4: Jean Baptiste TARDIF + Marie Felicite Rancourt

Gen 5: Brigitte Tardif + Charles BINET

Gen 6: Philomène Genevieve Binet  + Charles BINET

Gen 7: Philomène Adelphine Binet+ Honore TRUDEL

Gen 8: Leda Trudel + Mederic Duchesne

Gen 9: Palma DUCHESNE + Laurette Allard

Gen 10: Desneiges Duchense + Clifford LAMOTHE

Gen 11: Mona Lamothe + Patrick RICHARDS

Gen 12: MOI – Tina RICHARDS

Now to add to this story and where these lines intersect and cross further.

Roch Manitouabeouich was a Native who worked as a scout and interpreter for Olivier Le Tardif, who as we know was an agent for Samuel de Champlain representing la Compagnie des Cent-Associés involved in the fur trade.  There is a heated debate whether he was Huron or Algonquin.  He was also a friend to Le Tardif.  As an Abenaki married to a Huron, it is likely that Manitouabeouich knew several native dialects, making him invaluable to Le Tardif who was himself an interpreter to Champlain and instrumental in expanding the fur trade in New France.  Roch Manitouabewich had been converted to Christianity by the French missionaries. The baptismal ritual included the given Christian name of Roch, in honour of Saint Roch, the patron saint of dogs, falsely accused people, bachelors, and several other things.

Roch and his wife, Oueou Outchibahanouk. had a daughter,  the Jesuits baptized the baby girl with the name Marie and according to the records, Marie was an “Algonquin Manitouabe8ich Abenaquis”. Le Tardif became Godfather to the baby girl, and in accordance with the custom of the times, Le Tardif gave the girl his own name of Olivier. In addition to the name Marie Olivier, the Jesuit missionary performing the baptism gave the girl the name Sylvestre, meaning “one who comes from the forest” or “one who lives in the forest”. (Thwaites, The Jesuit Relations and Allied Documents, volume 11: 1610-1791)  http://puffin.creighton.edu/jesuit/relations/relations_01.html

When Marie Olivier Sylvestre was ten years old, Olivier Le Tardif adopted the young Indian girl as his very own daughter but she never carried the family name of LeTardif. This enabled her to be educated and reared in the same manner as a well-to-do French girl. First he placed her as a “live-in boarder” and student with the Ursuline Nuns at Quebec, and later he boarded her with a French family (Sieur Guillaume Hubou) where she was privately tutored. Marie Olivier Sylvestre met and married Martin Prévost, friend of the Hubou family and a very personal friend of Olivier LeTardif. This marriage was to be the first marriage of record between a Native girl and a French colonist mentioned in Canadian historical records.  The marriage took place in 1644 in Quebec. Recorded as witnesses to the ceremony were Olivier LeTardif and Quillaume Couillard, Le Tardif’s father in-law.

Olivier Le Tardif died at Château Richer in 1665 after a period of premature senility.  He le-tardiff-plaquehad moments of lucidity to the very end.  He was buried January 28 under the church of Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle in Château Richer.

Marie had 9 children with her husband Martin Prévost. Three of their children died in 1661 – Ursule, Marie Madeleine, 6 and her brother Antoine, 4 died on the same day –  March 16, 1661. Marie died at 37 years old after giving birth to her last child Therese. Her Marriage certificate to Martin Prévost indicates that she was born in Huron territory, Sillery. There are no records of the death of her parents.

Martin Prévost was one of the pioneers of Beauport near Quebec; b. 1611, son of Pierre Prévost and Charlotte Vien, of Montreuil-sur-le-Bois-de-Vincennes (now Montreuil-sous-Bois), near Paris; d. 26 Jan. 1691 at Beauport.   Prévost’s presence at Quebec is referred to in the documents of the notary Piraube as early as the year 1639.

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So, this is how I descend from the 1st documented marriage between a Franc settler to the new colony and a Native is as follows — follow along carefully because the lines cross here too!

  1. Roch Abenaki Manitouabeouich + Outchibahabanouk Oueou
  2. Marie-Olivier-Sylvestre Manitouabeouich. + Martin Prévost
  3. Jean-Baptiste Prévost + Marie Anne Giroux
  4. Catherine Prévost + Charles Petitclerc
  5. Charles Petitclerc + Marguerite Meunier
  6. Joseph Trudel + Magdelaine Langlois
  7. Joseph Trudel + Josephine Proteau
  8. Honore Trudel + Philomène Adelphine Binet
  9. Leda Trudel + Mederic Duchesne
  10. Palma Duchesne + Laurette Allard
  11. Desneiges Duchesne + Clifford Lamothe
  12. Mona Lamothe + Patrick Richards
  13. MOI – Tina Richards

Now, if you’re following along, you’re understanding how really cool these connections to history are and how the early lines of my ancestors are crossing … but let’s take it one step further even …

Until his death, we find Martin Prévost settled at Beauport as an “habitant,” or farmer. Prévost had had at least nine children by his first wife, Marie-Olivier-Sylvestre Manitouabeouich and we know she passed away shortly after giving birth to her daughter, Therese. He was married a second time in 1665, to Marie d’Abancourt, the widow of Jean Jolliet and of Gefroy Guillot.

From her marriage to Jean Jolliet, she had a child Louis.  Is the name Louis Joliet sounding at all familiar?  Well it should, this is the explorer I was telling you about!

In 1673, Joliet embarked on an expedition with Jacques Marquette, a missionary and linguist, to be among the first Europeans to explore what was called by Native Americans the “Mesipi” river and ascertain where it led to, with hopes of finding a passage to Asia. After meeting in the Michilimackinac region, the men started their journey by canoe on May 17, 1673, to what would be known as the Mississippi River.

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While Hernando De Soto was the first European to make official note of the Mississippi River by discovering its entrance in 1541, Jolliet and Marquette were the first to locate its upper reaches, and travel most of its length, about 130 years later.

Jolliet’s acclaim as an explorer was diminished somewhat when his records and maps were destroyed at the end of his trip. Anxious to reach Montreal, Jolliet decided to shoot the rapids of Lachine on the St. Lawrence instead of portaging around them. His canoe was toppled over, killing the Chief’s son and was rescued after clinging to a rock –  all records of the mission were lost. Although he later produced another report and map from memory, much of the detail was missing. Thus, Marquette’s journal became the accepted authority on the trip.

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Photo: A statue of the famed explorer and Joliet namesake, Louis Joliet guards the entrance to the Joliet Public Library Main Branch

Joliet’s main legacy is most tangible in the Midwestern United States and Quebec, mostly through geographical names, including the cities of Joliet, IllinoisJoliet, Montana; and JolietteQuebec (founded by one of Jolliet’s descendants, Barthélemy Joliet.

So how is that for a little piece of family history?  Who said history or genealogy is boring?  

Do any of you have any cool family connections or of historical significance?  I’d really be interested in hearing some …

Namaste

T  xo